Latest News from: Los Alamos National Laboratory

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HPC, Computing, supercomputering

‘Charliecloud’ Simplifies Big Data Supercomputing

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At Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved. In the case of a new product, dubbed “Charliecloud,” a crisp 800-line code helps supercomputer users operate in the high-performance world of Big Data without burdening computer center staff with the peculiarities of their particular software needs.

Science

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MARS, Water, mars rover, Gale Crater

Rover Findings Indicate Stratified Lake on Ancient Mars

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A long-lasting lake on ancient Mars provided stable environmental conditions that differed significantly from one part of the lake to another, according to a comprehensive look at findings from the first three-and-a-half years of NASA’s Curiosity rover mission.

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Space, MARS, ChemCam, Silica, Water on Mars

‘Halos’ Discovered on Mars Widen Time Frame for Potential Life

Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica—called “halos”—has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer than previously believed.

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Biofuel, Crystallography, Enzymes

Insight Into Enzyme’s 3D Structure Could Cut Biofuel Costs

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Using neutron crystallography, a Los Alamos research team has mapped the three-dimensional structure of a protein that breaks down polysaccharides, such as the fibrous cellulose of grasses and woody plants, a finding that could help bring down the cost of creating biofuels.

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CINT, nanotechnnology, DOE

Roelofs Takes Director Role at Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies

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Noted physicist Andreas Roelofs is the new director of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility with a core center at Sandia National Laboratories and a gateway research site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. CINT provides users from around the world with access to state-of-the-art expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment with a focus on nanoscience integration.

Medicine

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Health, Epidemeology, computer modeling and simulation, health science, biological threats

Managing Disease Spread Through Accessible Modeling

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A new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.

Medicine

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Biology, Health, TB, Bovine, Disease

On-the-Range Detection Technology Could Corral Bovine TB

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A research breakthrough allowing the first direct, empirical, blood-based, cow-side test for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis (TB) could spare ranchers and the agriculture industry from costly quarantines and the mass slaughter of animals infected with this easily spread disease.

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Quantum Dots, Solar Energy, Solar Cells, Renewable Energy

Ultrafast Measurements Explain Quantum Dot Voltage Drop

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Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.

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HPC, supermassive black holes, Computing, Simulations, Code

Breaking the Supermassive Black Hole Speed Limit

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A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.

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Van Allen belts, Van Allen Probes mission, NASA, Space Radiation

Less Radiation in Inner Van Allen Belt Than Previously Believed

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The inner Van Allen belt has less radiation than previously believed, according to a recent study in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Observations from NASA’s Van Allen probes show the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are actually much rarer and harder to find than scientists expected. This is good news for spacecraft that are orbiting in the region and can be damaged by high levels of radiation.







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