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antibiotic resisistance, Genomics, Ecology, Center for Ecosystem Science and Society, Bacteria, Food animal production, Translational Genomics Research Institute

Ecologist: Tracking Bacterial Movement Between Humans, Animals Key to Understanding Antibiotic Resistance

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Benjamin Koch and his co-authors treated bacteria the way they would any ecosystem, using genomic "tags" to track bacterial transmission.

Science

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Alan Alda, communicating science, science work, Engineering, Media

Beyond the Lab: Workshop Hosted by Top Media Publication & Alan Alda’s Center Transforms Scientists and Engineers into Storytellers

Scientific American and the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University are teaming up for a free online workshop aimed at helping scientists and engineers write blogs and op-eds for magazines, newspapers and other news outlets. Presented in partnership with The Kavli Foundation, two dozen scientists will receive mentoring on writing this fall and next spring, with successful assignments to be considered for publication as a Scientific American guest blog. The program will culminate with a special gathering in New York City in fall 2018, where course participants will network with instructors, science communication experts and peers as well as staff from the Alda Center and Scientific American.

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Cancer, Lung Cancer, pharmac

Blocking Cancer — Scientists Find New Way to Combat Disease

A compound developed by Dean Kip Guy’s lab of UK College of Pharmacy, with research that began at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, now shows promise for blocking cancer-causing proteins on a cellular level.

Science

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visual systems, Perceptual Systems, Psychology, Camouflage, Nature, University Of Texas At Austin

New Research Could Help Humans See What Nature Hides

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Things are not always as they appear. New visual perception research at The University of Texas at Austin, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explains the natural limits of what humans can see and how to find what nature hides.

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Neuroscience, Touch, Neuroprosthetics

Computer Model Simulates Sense of Touch From the Entire Hand

Neuroscientists from the University of Chicago have developed a computer model that can simulate the response of nerves in the hand to any pattern of touch stimulation on the skin. The tool reconstructs the response of more than 12,500 nerve fibers with millisecond precision, taking into account the mechanics of the skin as it presses up against and moves across objects.

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acoustic communication, Acoustic

Could This Strategy Bring High-Speed Communications to the Deep Sea?

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A new strategy for sending acoustic waves through water could potentially open up the world of high-speed communications to divers, marine research vessels, remote ocean monitors, deep sea robots, and submarines. By taking advantage of the dynamic rotation generated as the acoustic wave travels, also known as its orbital angular momentum, Berkeley Lab researchers were able to pack more channels onto a single frequency, effectively increasing the amount of information capable of being transmitted.

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Semiconductor, Perovskite

New Class of 'Soft' Semiconductors Could Transform HD Displays

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New research by Berkeley Lab scientists could help usher in a new generation of high-definition displays, optoelectronic devices, photodetectors, and more. They have shown that a class of “soft” semiconductors can be used to emit multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers. The work could challenge quantum dot displays that rely upon traditional semiconductor nanocrystals to emit light.

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Microbial Ecology, Oil Spill

Microbe Mystery Solved: What Happened to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Plume

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The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 is one of the most studied spills in history, yet scientists haven’t agreed on the role of microbes in eating up the oil. Now a research team at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has identified all of the principal oil-degrading bacteria as well as their mechanisms for chewing up the many different components that make up the released crude oil.

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office space, open floor plan, office acoustics, office noise, soundproof, curtains, acoustical impedances, sound dampening, Jonas Schira, Gerriets GmbH , Acoustics ’17 Boston

Curtains for Privacy and Quiet

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Anyone who works in an office with an open floor plan becomes aware of a major downside of these otherwise collaborative spaces: It is impossible to hold confidential meetings with colleagues. One solution developed by a German textile manufacturer is a system of sound-insulating curtains to create temporary, sound-proofed “variable zones” within the open office, where private conversations can occur. The system will be described by Jonas Schira of Gerriets GmbH during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

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Endocrine Reviews, Endocrine Society, scientific statement, Obesity, Weight Loss

Endocrine Society Issues Scientific Statement on Obesity’s Causes

A new Scientific Statement issued by the Endocrine Society calls for more research aimed specifically at understanding the underlying mechanisms that make it difficult to maintain long-term weight loss.







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