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Science

Microscope, Biology, Lenses, Vision, Microscopy, Biological, Sciences

Scientists Correct Microscope "Vision Problems"

Faulty human eyesight can be corrected with glasses, but itís a different matter to fix vision problems that afflict instruments used by scientists who explore the microcosmos. Two Oregon scientists conducting research with National Science Foundation (NSF)-support, however, have found a way to do it. As with many problems in human eyesight, the culprit in the world of microscopes is the lens.

Business

Participative, Management, Employee, Teams, Workplace, Job, Satisfaction

Participative Management Hurts Employee Relations

One of the hot new trends in management -- worker participation -- has been touted as a boon to employees because it allows them to play an active role in making decisions involving their jobs. But such management systems, which often involve workplace teams, may hurt relations among co-workers, a new study suggests.

Medicine

Neuroprotectant, Stroke, tPA

'Protective' drug reduces disability from stroke

First came drugs to break apart clots that can cause a stroke when they block an artery carrying blood to the brain. Now researchers are developing a new family of drugs called neuroprotectants designed to minimize the disabling damage to brain tissue that can occur downstream from the clot, caused by the loss of blood flow that characterizes these ischemic strokes.

Medicine

Paramedics, Stroke, Motor, Paralysis

Paramedic-administered test identifies stroke

A new three-minute screening test that detects one-sided motor paralysis allows paramedics and other first-responders to rapidly identify people experiencing a stroke, and may soon enable on-the-scene treatment with drugs that can limit the potentially extensive damage caused by these ìbrain attacks,î Los Angeles researchers reported here today at the American Heart Associationís 22nd International Joint Conference on Stroke and Cerebral Circulation.

Medicine

Alcohol, Stroke

A drop of drink can protect against stroke

A bit of alcohol can protect against stroke, but even a little cigarette smoke carries a hidden stroke risk, researchers reported here today at the American Heart Associationís 22nd International Joint Conference on Stroke and Cerebral Circulation. Light or occasional alcohol consumption lowered stroke risk by up to 62 percent compared to non-drinkers in a New York City study. But people who had at least five drinks daily tripled their stroke risk.

Medicine

Stroke, Public, Awareness, tPA

Too few able to recognize 'brain attack'

The ability to recognize symptoms and risk factors for stroke, the nationís third leading cause of death and leading cause of serious disability, appears to be woefully inadequate among the general public and people experiencing ìbrain attack,î Cincinnati researchers reported here today at the American Heart Associationís 22nd International Joint Conference on Stroke and Cerebral Circulation.

Medicine

Stroke, tPA, Clots

TPA in stroke pays for itself in health-care savings

Clot-dissolver tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) can reduce the disability of people who survive an ischemic stroke, one caused by a clot that blocks an artery carrying blood to the brain. But given the drugís cost of over $2,000 a dose, are the benefits worth the money? Yes, according to a new study.

Medicine

Nutrition, Diet, Heart, Disease, Stroke

Invitation to cover preventive nutrition conference

Preventive Nutrition: Pediatrics to Geriatrics will be the focus of an American Heart Association scientific conference, Feb. 24-26, at the Salt Lake Hilton in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Business

WIN, Investment, Market, Rational, Rationality, Expected, Utility

Big 'winners' may play a different game

The biggest winners in an investment market may be playing the game according to their own rules, rather the "rational" economic rules followed by most investors.

Science

Global, Warming, Greenhouse, Effect, Climate, Change

Climate models produce 'interesting' results

Fourteen of the most widely used global climate models, which are used by scientists to predict global climate change and by policy makers to formulate appropriate environmental policy, were less prescient than expected in a major test designed to determine their accuracy in predicting global warming or cooling.







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