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Science

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3D printing, 3D printer, Consumers

Just Press Print: New Study Shows How 3-D Printing at Home Saves Big Bucks

New research from Michigan Technological University shows that consumers who invest in an at-home 3-D printer can not only make their money back within six months, but may also see an almost 1,000 percent return on their investment over a five-year period.

Medicine

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Environment, Fundamental Science, Computational Science, Awards and Honors, Climate Science, Atmospheric Science, Chemistry, Catalysis

Two PNNL Researchers Elected to Membership in the National Academy of Engineering

Two scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will become members of the prestigious National Academy of Engineering.

Life

Pop Culture

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Youth Villages

Going, Going, Gone! Steven Tyler’s Janie’s Fund Wins Big at Barrett-Jackson Auction with Sale of Rare Sports Car

A rare sports car from the personal collection of Steven Tyler has been auctioned, raising $800,000 for his Janie’s Fund, a philanthropic partnership with Youth Villages.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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picky suitor problem, stopping problem

A Theoretical Physicist Reassures the Lovelorn

Here, in celebration of Valentine's Day, we present another of the paradoxes, sometimes called the Picky Suitor problem: Can you guess the odds that you will find your one and only among the 9 billion people on the planet?

Science

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Possible Key to Regeneration Found in Planaria’s Origins

A new report from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research chronicles the embryonic origins of planaria, providing new insight into the animal's remarkable regenerative abilities.

Medicine

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Microbiome, Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Microbiomes More in Flux in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to see dramatic shifts in the make-up of the community of microbes in their gut than healthy people, according to a study published in Nature Microbiology. The results help physicians understand the disease more fully and potentially offer new ways to track the disease and monitor patients.

Medicine

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Dentistry, Cavities, pain, UAB School of Dentistry

New Cavity Treatment Offers No Drilling, No Filling

UAB School of Dentistry is offering patients with cavities between teeth a new, less painful option for treatment in a new clinical trial.

Medicine

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Health, patient therapy , Animals, Dogs, Animal Assisted Therapy

Notes and Tails of Patient Therapy at HUP

At 2:30 on a Wednesday afternoon, I headed down to 3001 Market Street to meet Katie Deschaine, a Senior Applications Manager. She plays an important role in operations of the Health System’s electronic health records, EPIC, but I was there to see the epic performance by her therapy dog Robert in brightening the days of patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Immigration, Trump, 9th Circuit, H1B, legal immigration, Economy

University of Michigan Professor Compares Trump's Immigration Ban to a Lender Withdrawing Its Loan Offer After Successful Vetting of a Borrower

Science

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New Supercomputer Triples Earth System Science Capability with Greater Efficiency

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences.

Science

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Green Bank Observatory, GBO, Milky Way

Young Astronomer Presents Research

Cannan Huey-You, an 11-year-old astronomer, presents new research from the Green Bank Telescope at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Northwestern University, Super Bowl, National Anthem, Singing, Video

Singing the National Anthem Is Anything but Easy

For more than 30 years, Wayne Messmer has been wowing crowds with his signature rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at Northwestern University and in most of the major athletic arenas in Chicago.

Medicine

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Relationships, Older Adults, Later Age, End Of Life Decisions, medical decisions, Living Apart Together

Older Adults Embracing ‘Living Apart Together’

Since 1990, the divorce rate among adults 50 years and older has doubled. This trend, along with longer life expectancy, has resulted in many adults forming new partnerships later in life. A new phenomenon called ‘Living Apart Together’ (LAT)—an intimate relationship without a shared residence—is gaining popularity as an alternative form of commitment. Researchers at the University of Missouri say that while the trend is well understood in Europe, it is lesser known in the U.S. This means that challenges, such as how LAT partners can engage in family caregiving or decision-making, could affect family needs.

Medicine

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Osteomyelitis, MRSA, Mrsa Infections, MRSA strains, MRSA superbug, Stem Cell, stem cell activation, stem cell bio-manufacturing, Stem Cell Development, Scaffold, Scaffold Proteins, Scaffolding, Scaffolds, Bone Infections, Bone Regeneration, silver ions, Silver

A Silver Bullet Against MRSA: Silver Ion-Coated Medical Devices Could Fight MRSA While Creating New Bone

The rise of MRSA infections is limiting the treatment options for physicians and surgeons. Now, an international team of researchers, led by Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has used silver ion-coated scaffolds, or biomaterials that are created to hold stem cells, which slow the spread of or kill MRSA while regenerating new bone. Scientists feel that the biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds could be the first step in the fight against MRSA in patients.

Science

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Scripps Institution Of Oceanography, Uc San Diego, James Day

First Nuclear Explosion Helps Test Theory of Moon’s Formation

Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego Professor James Day and colleagues examined radioactive glass found blanketing the ground after the first nuclear test bomb explosion is being used by scientists to test theories about the Moon’s formation some 4.5 billion years ago.

Science

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Human Evolution, Anatomy, Medical School, Reseach, Primates, foot biomechanics, foot morphology, Paleoanthropology

Chimpanzee Feet Allow Scientists a New Grasp on Human Foot Evolution

An investigation into the evolution of human walking by looking at how chimpanzees walk on two legs is the subject of a new research paper published in Journal of Human Evolution.

Medicine

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AMD, age-related macular degeneration, Retina, eye, Vision, Wills Eye Hospital, Ophthalmology

Early Detection of Macular Degeneration Vital to Preserve Vision, Wills Eye Expert Says

Carl D. Regillo, MD Chief of the Wills Eye Hospital Retina Service discusses what patients need to know about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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gift, gift-giving, Shopping, Gifts, Retail, Relationships, Valentine's Day, Mother's Day, birthdays, Christmas

Marketing Expert Available to Discuss Gift Buying and Relationships

Medicine

Science

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Super Bug, MRSA, Mrsa Infections, Drug Development, Drug Discovery, Marine Organisms, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute

Compound from Deep-Water Marine Sponge Could Provide Antibacterial Solutions for MRSA

A compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also called the “super bug.”

Medicine

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Premature Birth, NICU, Preemie Care

NICU Study Highlights Need to Reduce Loud Noises, Boost Beneficial Sounds

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that preemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development.







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