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Medicine

Tylenol, pain, Relief, Internet, www, Medications

Tylenol(R) Opens Internet Site

TYLENOL(R), the world's leading over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever, has launched a new site (www.Tylenol.com) on the Internet where consumers and healthcare professionals can find important information about the proper use of OTC pain medications, common illnesses, pain management and self-care.

Medicine

Food, Disease, Conference, Washington

Foodborne Disease Conference March 1997

On March 24-26, 1997, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, and in collaboration with other organizations, will host a conference on emerging foodborne pathogens. The conference will take place at the Radisson Plaza Hotel, Mark Center, in Alexandria, Virginia.

Medicine

Enzyme, Signalling, Crystallography, Catalytic, Adenylyl, Cyclase, Messenger

Structure of Signalling Enzyme Power Center

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin Medical School and the National Institutes of Health have determined the three-dimensional structure of the "catalytic core," or main power center, of adenylyl cyclase. Adenylyl cyclase is a key player in the system that receives messages from outside cells and sends them repackaged to cell centers involved in any number of activities.

Medicine

Asthma, Education, Treatment

National Jewish Takes Asthma Expertise To Canyon Ranch in Tucson, Oct. 26-Nov. 2

The world's leading asthma research and treatment center and an Arizona health resort known as a worldwide leader in healthy living awareness and education are teaming to offer a week-long Adult Asthma Week from Sunday, Oct. 26-Sunday, Nov. 2.

Medicine

Cardiac, Heart, Attacks, Denial, Anger

Denial May Kill Cardiac Patients

DETROIT -- We've all heard that anger can kill. Yet for cardiac patients, perhaps denial of anger is even more deadly. Denial of anger emerged as a stronger predictor for death and other cardiac incidents, such as new heart attacks or additional cardiac procedures, than traditional cardiac risk factors, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study conducted by Mark Ketterer, Ph.D.

Medicine

Insulin, Diabetes, oral, Drugs, Tight, Junctions, zot, Immunoglobulins

Oral insulin Possible: Cholera Shares a Secret

The microbe that causes cholera has revealed the underlying mechanism for a promising new technology for oral delivery of drugs not normally absorbed through the intestines, such as insulin and immunoglobulins. Embargoed for release March 19, 1997

Medicine

American, Psychiatric, Psychiatry, Mental, Medical, Medicine, Psychology, Psych

APA Announces Legal Actions to Protect Patients

APA Announces Legal Actions To Protect Patients: 1)Challenges managed care profiteering by joining as plaintiff in antitrust lawsuit filed in New York State; 2)Seeks to protect patients from discrimination under the Americans With Disabilities Act; 3) Financial support of class action lawsuits against Blue Cross Companies reviews of medical necessity of treatment decisions; 4) Proactive litigation strategy and fund; 5) Further information about these suits

Medicine

Prostate, Cancer, Canarypox, Virus, Cytokines, Immunization, Genetics, Sequences

New Technique for Prostate Cancer Therapy

A researcher at the University of Iowa College of Medicine has discovered a technique that may open new doors for prostate cancer therapy. Dr. Timothy Ratliff, UI professor of urology, says a virus called canarypox has the potential to be used as a means of transporting genes that stimulate anti-tumor activity into prostate cancer cells. Ratliff's research appears in the March 19 issue of Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Medicine

Pulmonary, Asthma, air, Pollution, Respiratory, Symptoms, Cells, Cigarette, Smoke

ATS News Tips from March Journals

The following stories appear in the American Thoracic Society (ATS) March journals: 1- pulmonary problems greater in low income individuals; 2- moderate levels of air pollution can cause respiratory problems in children; 3- how cigarette smoke inhalation stimulates bone marrow. EMBARGOED: Mar. 20, 1997, 6:00 p.m.

Medicine

Cornell, Wounds, Wound, Closure, Staples, Sutures

Book on Wound-Closing Biomaterials and Devices

Cornell fiber scientist C.C. Chu is editor of new text, "Wound Closure Biomaterials and Devices." The book provides comprehensive information on state-of-the-art, innovative biomaterials, devices and techniques used in wound closure.

Medicine

Stroke, Decongestant, Pseudoephedrine, Migraine, Alzheimer's Disease, APOE

News from American Academy of Neurology 1997 Meeting

Media representatives are invited to attend the American Academy of Neurology's 49th Annual Meeting April 12-19 in Boston, MA. Studies presented at the meeting include: 1) Extensive Decongestant Use Linked to Stroke; 2) Gene Affects Risk of Alzheimer's Disease Differently Among Races Please note individual embargo dates.

Medicine

Depression, Elderly, Patients, Primary, care, Prostate, Cancer

March 15, 1997 Annals of Internal Medicine TipSheet

1) Relationship Between Symptoms of Depression in Older Patients and Health Status; 2) ACP Prostate Cancer Screening Recommendations; 3) ACP Position Paper: Inner-City Health Care; 4) ACP Annual Session March 22-24, 1997, Pennsylvania Convention Center. Info: (215) 351-2655.

Medicine

Johns, Hopkins, Medicine, Oxidants, Cancer, Genetics, Antioxidants, Free Radicals

Antioxidants May Block Cancers' Molecular Messengers

Johns Hopkins scientists may have identified how oxidants can worsen cancerous cell growth and how antioxidants can suppress it. Antioxidants have long been thought to fight cancer; the current findings give insight into how the protection may occur and how it may be harnessed for anti-cancer therapies.

Medicine

Child, Adolescent, Health, Pediatrics, PET, Reptile, Iguana, Salmonella

AAP-Pet Reptiles Health Risk for Children

Being the first kid on your block to own a reptile may be cool, but its also a health risk, according to a study in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Medicine

Child, Adolescent, Health, Pediatrics, Obese, Height, Weight, Fat

AAP-21-Year Study Says Increase in Obesity, Weig

Children and adults are more likely to be overweight and obese than they were 20 years ago, according to a recent study in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Medicine

Child, Adolescent, Health, Pediatrics, Gas, CANS, burn, Death, Injury, FUEL

AAP-Gas Cans Pose Burn Hazard to Children

Parents who store gasoline in safety cans rather than the more popular rectangular metal gasoline cans may prevent burn deaths and injuries to young children, according to a study on the electronic version of Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Medicine

Infant, Child, Health, Newborn, Academy, Pediatrics, Epidural, Birth, pain, Fever

AAP--Epidurals May Affect Newborns

Women who receive epidurals to ease labor pains may be increasing discomfort for their newborns, according to a study published in this months Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Medicine

Academy, Pediatrics, Child, Adolescent, Health, ear, Infections, care, Allergies

AAP--Recurrent Ear Infections on Increase

Over a seven-year period, there was a 44 percent increase in recurrent ear infections among preschool children, according to a study published on the electronic version of Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Medicine

Depression, Insomnia, Sleep, Disorders, Prozac

Melatonin May Ease Insomnia with Depression

Northwestern University Medical School researchers have launched a study to determine the effectiveness of melatonin to relieve insomnia in the initial weeks of ProzacÆ therapy. They believe the hormone melatonin may not only improve sleep but also diminish depression that has been exacerbated by sleep deprivation.

Medicine

Calcium, cell, Signaling, Sodium, PUMP, Hypertension, Ouabain, Physiology

Calcium Storage, Release Mechanism Revealed

New technology has enabled physiologists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine to visualize the organization of intracellular calcium stored in the reticulum of cells. They also have located sodium pumps with a high affinity for the hormone ouabain next to the reticulum, where they play a vital role in controlling the storage and release of calcium. Findings could lead to new and better therapies for hypertension, heart failure, stroke.







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