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Michigan Tech, Michigan Technological University, Aleksey Smirnov, geodynamo, Earth Science, Geophysics, Magnetism, Magnetic Field

Old Rocks, Biased Data: Overcoming Challenges Studying the Geodynamo

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Bias introduced through analyzing the magnetism of old rocks may not be giving geophysicists an accurate idea of how Earth's magnetic dynamo has functioned. A team led by Michigan Technological University shows there is a way to improve the methodology to get a better understanding of the planet's geodynamo.

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Intergalactic Unions More Devastating Than We Thought

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Scientists estimated the number of stars disrupted by solitary supermassive black holes in galactic centers formed due to mergers of galaxies containing supermassive black holes.

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Oceanography, Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, Public Health, Ozone, Ozone Pollution, Air Pollution, University of Washington

'The Blob' of Abnormal Conditions Boosted Western U.S. Ozone Levels

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Abnormal conditions in the northeast Pacific Ocean, nicknamed “the blob,” put ozone levels in June 2015 higher than normal over a large swath of the Western U.S.

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Cancer, Cell Division, cell

Scientists Discover How the Cells in Skin and Organ Linings Maintain Constant Cell Numbers

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Research published today in Nature from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah shows how epithelial cells naturally turn over, maintaining constant numbers between cell division and cell death.

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Autism, MRI, Imaging, Predicting Autism

Researchers Use MRIs to Predict Which High-Risk Babies Will Develop Autism as Toddlers

Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants with older siblings with autism, researchers from around the country were able to correctly predict 80 percent of those infants who would later meet criteria for autism at two years of age.

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Extreme Waves, Melting Canadian Glaciers, Lionfish in the Gulf, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

Medicine

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Scripps Florida Scientists Take Aim at Obesity-Linked Protein

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In a study recently published online in the journal Molecular Metabolism, Chakraborty and his colleagues have shown that deleting the gene for this protein, known as IP6K1, protects animal models from both obesity and diabetes.

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Researchers Pinpoint Watery Past on Mars

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Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a patch of land in an ancient valley on Mars that appears to have been flooded by water in the not-too-distant past. In doing so, they have pinpointed a prime target to begin searching for past life forms on the Red Planet.

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Cancer, DNA, Glucose, Metabolism, CNA

DNA Patterns Can Unlock How Glucose Metabolism Drives Cancer, Study Finds

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Less aggressive cancers are known to have an intact genome—the complete set of genes in a cell—while the genome of more aggressive cancers tends to have a great deal of abnormalities. Now, a new multi-year study of DNA patterns in tumor cells suggests that these aberrant genetic signatures are not random but reflect selective forces in tumor evolution.

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food dye, Allura red, food monitoring, Pharmaceutical, Food Quality, food stability, Food Safety, Fluorescent, Physical Properties, Bogumil Zelent, Rahul Chib, Sarah Waxman, Alexia Ciarfella, Maria Corradini, Richard D. Ludescher, Rutgers University, University Of Pennsylvania, University Of Massachusetts, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

The Glow of Food Dye Can Be Used to Monitor Food Quality

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Allura Red, a synthetic food and pharmaceutical color widely used within the U.S., boasts special properties that may make it and other food dyes appropriate as sensors or edible probes to monitor foods and pharmaceuticals. A team of researchers -- from Rutgers University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Massachusetts -- recently made this discovery during an extension of their work identifying and characterizing molecules in foods or food ingredients that might provide signals of food quality, stability or safety.

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light flashes, oxidative metabolism, biomedical diagnostics, light detection, Oxidative Stress, early-stage diagnostics, Michael Poplova, Eduard P.A. Van Wijk, Michal Cifra

Flashes of Light Offer Potential for Biomedical Diagnostics

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A group of researchers from the Czech Republic were intrigued that living organisms emit small amounts of light resulting during oxidative metabolism, when oxygen is used to create energy by breaking down carbohydrates. The researchers began to think about how detecting this light could have potential for biomedical diagnostics. At the Biophysical Society’s meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017, Michal Cifra will present the group’s work within this realm.

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American Concrete Institute Releases 2017 Edition of Manual of Concrete Practice

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The American Concrete Institute (ACI) has released the printed and digital editions of one of its 2017 Manual of Concrete Practice.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Emotions Are Cognitive, Not Innate, Researchers Conclude

Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City University of New York, conclude.

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Benchly, coastal resources, Coastal Management

URI’s Coastal Resources Center Wins 2017 Peter Benchley Ocean Award

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Jennifer McCann, director of U.S. coastal programs for the Coastal Resources Center at the University of Rhode Island and extension director of Rhode Island Sea Grant, has received an international award for her work in coastal and ocean planning.

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Sorghum, Breeding, Genotypes, Crops, Genetics

Popping Potential of Sorghum

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Eating popcorn has long been synonymous with watching movies. But soon you might find yourself reaching for another popped snack option—popped sorghum.

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Using 'Scotch Tape' and Laser Beams, Researchers Craft New Material That Could Improve LED Screens

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“We’d someday like to see LEDs that are thinner, more energy efficient and bendable,” said researcher Hui Zhao. “Think about a computer or phone screen if you could fold it a few times or and put it in your pocket.”

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Computational Science, Information Science, data-driven discovery, data science, high-performance computing

Francis Alexander Named Deputy Director of Brookhaven Lab's Computational Science Initiative

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Alexander brings extensive management and leadership experience in computational science research to the position.

Medicine

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UF/IFAS Entomologist Gets $200,000 to Help Develop Rapid Zika Detection

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Barry Alto, a UF/IFAS assistant professor of medical entomology, said scientists need better diagnostic tools to detect Zika virus to meet challenges to public health. He is working with collaborator Steven Benner at Firebird Biomolecular Sciences LLC to develop methods they hope should take about an hour – far less time than current testing methods.

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Cadherin, Cell Adhesion, super-resolution microscopy

Illuminating the Contacts

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Using super-resolution microscopy, an international research team led by Assistant Professor Pakorn (Tony) Kanchanawong from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at NUS, as well as Dr Cristina Bertocchi, Research Fellow at MBI, has revealed, for the first time, how cadherin-based cell-cell contacts are organised.

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nano devices, Engineering, Electronics, stretchable electronics

Is a Stretchable Smart Tablet in Our Future?

Engineering researchers at Michigan State University have developed the first stretchable integrated circuit that is made entirely using an inkjet printer, raising the possibility of inexpensive mass production of smart fabric.







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