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Smoking Cessation, Health, Public Service Announcement, Advertsing, Smoking, Nostalgia, Disease

Smokers’ Memories Could Help Them Quit

Rather than inciting fear, anti-smoking campaigns should tap into smokers’ memories and tug at their heartstrings, finds a new study by Michigan State University researchers.

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Antibiotic Resistance, Microbes, Infection, klebsiella pneumonia

Queen’s Researchers Make Breakthrough in Fight Against Superbug

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have discovered why a lethal superbug is so resistant to the last line antibiotic meaning potential treatments could now be developed to fight the killer infection.

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Ut Southwestern, Kidney Disease, Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease, Adpkd

UT Southwestern Researchers Develop Potential Treatment for Fatal, Incurable Kidney Disease

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Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center, working with a California biotech firm, have developed a potential drug to treat polycystic kidney disease – an incurable genetic disease that often leads to end-stage kidney failure

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Science

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flu, Influenza, Virus, Health, Virology, Medicine, Science, Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Jersey, NJ, HIV, Ebola, therapeutic interfering particles, tips, Materials Science, Engineering, Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering, Nanoparticles, GOLD

Attacking the Flu by Hijacking Infected Cells

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They’re called TIPs and their task would be to infiltrate and outcompete influenza, HIV, Ebola and other viruses. Soon, Rutgers’ Laura Fabris will play a key role in a project aimed at designing TIPs – therapeutic interfering particles to defuse the flu. For the first time in virology, Fabris and her team will use imaging tools with gold nanoparticles to monitor mutations in the influenza virus, with unprecedented sensitivity, when it enters cells. Fabris will soon receive a $820,000 grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It’s part of a four-year, $5.2 million INTERfering and Co-Evolving Prevention and Therapy (INTERCEPT) program.

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Fragile X Syndrome, Steven Tyler's Janie's Fund Wins Big, Untreated Water Making Our Kids Sick, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

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Charles Holmes, Annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

Tip Sheet: Johns Hopkins Researchers Present Findings at Science Conference in Seattle

The Annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

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Spinal Cord Injuries

Spinal Cord Injury Patients Face Many Serious Health Problems Besides Paralysis

Spinal cord injury patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; pneumonia; life-threatening blood clots; bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; constipation and other gastrointestinal problems; pressure ulcers; and chronic pain.

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Science

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Schizophrenia, Autism, neurologic disorder

Kennesaw State University Scientists Conducting Cutting-Edge Research

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Two Kennesaw State University scientists have received a total of $737,364 in National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health grants for developmental biology research into autism and birth defects.

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Opioid, Drug Abuse, opioid abuse, Physicians and Opioids, opioid prescribing, prescribing practices, Opioid use, Opioid Epidemic, Harvard Medical School, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Opioid Addiction, opioid overdose, Addiction

Habit Forming

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At a glance: New research shows great variation among clinicians’ opioid prescribing practices and links physician prescription patterns to patients’ risk for subsequent long-term opioid use. Being treated by an emergency room physician who prescribes opioids more frequently increases a patient’s risk of long-term opioid use and other adverse outcomes. The results suggest that differences in clinicians’ prescribing habits may be helping to fuel the opioid epidemic sweeping the United States.

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NIH, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Neonatal Research Network , Preterm Births, Preterm Delivery, neurodevelopmental outcomes, Neurodevelopment Disabilities, Neonatology, NICU, Intensive Care Patients, Preemies, Preemie Care, Premature Births, Premature Birth

More Extremely Preterm Babies Survive, Live Without Neurological Impairment

Babies born at just 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy continue to have sobering outlooks -- only about 1 in 3 survive. But according to a new study led by Duke Health and appearing Feb. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine, those rates are showing small but measurable improvement. Compared to extremely preterm babies born a decade earlier, the study found a larger percentage are developing into toddlers without signs of moderate or severe cognitive and motor delay.

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Quality of Life (QOL), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Short Form-6D (SF-6D), Total Hip Arthroplasty, Total Hip Replacement, value-based care, patient-reported outcomes, Michael A Mont, MD

After Joint Replacement Surgery, Smokers at Increased Risk of Reoperation for Infection

For patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement, smoking is associated with an increased risk of infectious (septic) complications requiring repeat surgery, reports a study in the February 15 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Cardiology, Heart Attack, Cardiovascular, STEMI, Clogged Arteries, heart blockage, Myocardial, defibrilator, Pacemaker, Anesthesia

Preparation, Attention to Detail Translates to Excellence in Cardiac Care

Jaromir Bobek of Harris Health System's Ben Taub Hospital prides himself on his cardiology team's preparation and attention to detail. The service line routinely receives national recognition for its expertise and quick treatment of some of the most severe heart attack cases.

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Heart Failure, Heart Transplant, total artificial heart, LVAD, Left Ventricular Assist Device, Heart Failure Devices

The Medical Minute: Treatment Options for Heart Failure

Ask any doctor what can be done to maintain a healthy heart and the answer will most likely be eat healthy and exercise regularly. But what happens when someone's heart is not healthy and does not pump blood properly?

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Study: Hormone Therapy May Not Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease

The latest study on hormone therapy and Alzheimer’s disease shows no relationship between taking the drugs and whether you may develop the disease years later. Some previous studies have shown that hormone therapy may increase the risk of the disease, while others have shown that it may reduce the risk. The new study was published in the February 15, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Medicaid Expansion Possibly Reduced 'Medical Divorces,' Economists Find

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In the paper distributed this month by the National Bureau of Economic Research, University of Kansas researchers found states that did expand Medicaid under the 2010 Affordable Care Act experienced a 5.6 percent decrease in the prevalence of divorce among people ages 50-64, compared with those states that did not expand.

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Breast Cancer, 21 gene assay, 21-gene expression, early-stage breast cancer, MD Anderson Cancer Center

More Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer May Be Able to Avoid Chemotherapy in the Future

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Women with early-stage breast cancer who had an intermediate risk recurrence score (RS) from a 21-gene expression assay had similar outcomes, regardless of whether they received chemotherapy, a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer finds.

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Autism Center at Rush Seeking Participants for Social Skills Study

Chicagoland families and providers with children on the autism spectrum are invited to enroll in a groundbreaking social skills study. The Autism Center at Rush University Medical Center is actively recruiting children ages 8-11 with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to participate in a study evaluating how behavioral therapy and the hormone oxytocin can enhance social thinking skills.

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International Team Establishes First Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Multicentric Castleman Disease

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More than six decades after Castleman disease (CD) was first described, a group of experts from Penn Medicine and other institutions around the world has established the first set of diagnostic criteria for a life-threatening subtype of the condition, idiopathic multicentric CD (iMCD), which is often misdiagnosed as other illnesses.

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Signals From Fat May Aid Diagnostics and Treatments

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Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have identified a route by which fat also can deliver a form of small RNAs called microRNAs that helps to regulate other organs. This mechanism may offer the potential to develop an entirely new therapeutic approach.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Obestiy, Teenagers, Teens, Exercise, Physical Activity, physical activity counseling, pediatric psychology, Health Promotion, Exercise Motivation

Getting Inside Teens’ Heads: Study Upsets Beliefs About Feelings and Exercise Probability

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A pilot study tracking adolescents’ internal psychological states and physical activity in near real-time challenges prevailing assumptions about how to increase physical activity.







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