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Medicine

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Cancer, Leukemia, Bone Marrow Transplants

Patrick Stiff, MD, Awarded Loyola's Stritch Medal

Patrick J. Stiff, MD, a world renowned cancer physician, researcher and teacher, has received the Stritch Medal, the highest honor given by Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Science

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phenotyping, Genotype, Neurology, Autism, Schizophrenia, Disease Risk, C. Elegans, Hang Lu, sorting instrument, Algorithm, Computational Genetics

Secret Phenotypes: Disease Devils in Invisible Details

The human eye often falls short in the hunt for faint genetic drivers that raise the risk of devastating neurological diseases such as autism and schizophrenia. But little eludes a microscope optic attached to a computer, and algorythms that can relate previously hidden phenotypes to subtle genetic mutations. The computational screening developed by Georgia Tech researchers has the potential to reveal webs of genetic dangers that produce disease risk by compounding tiny traits that, when take alone, may appear trivial and harmless.

Business

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Cuba, Cuba embargo, travel to cuba, Fidel Castro, foreign direct investment, foreign direct investment in Cuba, Cuban-American diplomatic relations, easing of travel restrictions to Cuba , Cuban government, tourism in Cuba

What’s Next for U.S.-Cuba Business Relations? International Markets Specialist Discusses Possible Moves

Science

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Earth Science, Climate Change, Glacier, Antarctica, rift, Calving, Iceberg

West Antarctic Ice Shelf Breaking Up From the Inside Out

A key glacier in Antarctica is breaking apart from the inside out, suggesting that the ocean is weakening ice on the edges of the continent.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Stress, Learning, Memory, retrieval practice, Study Habits

Practice Testing Protects Memory Against Stress

Learning by taking practice tests, a strategy known as retrieval practice, can protect memory against the negative effects of stress, report scientists from Tufts University in a new study published in Science on Nov. 25.

Science

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Toronto rehabilitation institute, Toronto Rehab, rehabilitation research, university health network, UHN, Winter, winter footwear, winter boots, winter shoes, Canadian winter, Green Diamond, Arctic Vibrum, Toronto Public Health, footwear testing, slip resistant boots, slip resistance, slip resistance testing, consumer footwear, footwear research, Geoff Fernie, Winterlab, iDAPT, rate my treads

Researchers Discover Most Winter Boots Are Too Slippery to Walk Safely on Icy Surfaces

A team of researchers from the iDAPT labs at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network are dedicated to keeping Canadians safer this winter by offering evidence-based ratings on footwear that may reduce the risk of slips and falls on ice. The team has developed the first test of its kind in the world – the Maximum Achievable Angle (MAA) Testing Method – to validate slip resistant footwear on icy surfaces using real people in a simulated winter environment.

Medicine

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Duke Health, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Psychiatric Care, PTSD, Ptsd Therapy, Ptsd Treament, active duty, U.S. Military, STRONG STAR Consortium

Active-Duty Military Find PTSD Relief Through Individual Cognitive Therapy

Although both group and individual therapy can ease post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active-duty military service members, individual therapy relieved PTSD symptoms better and quicker, according to a study led by a Duke University School of Medicine researcher. The randomized clinical trial is the largest to date to examine an evidence-based treatment for active-duty military service members, with 268 participants from the U.S. Army’s Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas. Findings will be published Nov. 23 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Science

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Football, Geology, seismic activity, Education, Earth Science

Shaking the ’Shoe: Fan Celebrations at Ohio State Football Games Register on a Seismic Scale

The Ohio State University doesn’t just make big plays—it measures exactly how big those plays are, and uses the data to teach students valuable lessons in science.

Medicine

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Cochlear Implant

Patient's Hearing Is Restored Thanks to Cochlear Implant at Loyola

Julia Conkin's hearing was so poor she needed to use sign language to communicate. Then she received a cochlear implant at Loyola Medicine, and the results were spectacular. "I could hear things I had not heard for years, like music and conversations at gatherings,” she said. “It was beautiful to hear other people.”

Science

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Smart sensing technology, infrastructure damage, Nanoscience & Technology, Quantum Dots

Mood Ring Materials – a New Way to Detect Damage in Failing Infrastructure

"Mood ring materials" constitute a new type of smart sensing technology that could play an important role in minimizing and mitigating damage to the nation's failing infrastructure.

Life

Education

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Music Education, prison education, Prison Inmates, developmental teaching, Teacher Certification, teacher disposition

FSU Faculty, Students Connect with Prison Choir Through Power of Music

Professor Judy Bowers and students from FSU's choral education program are working with the women's choir at Gadsden Correctional Facility, and the teaching and learning is a two-way street.

Medicine

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prostate biopsy, Prostate Cancer, Prostate Cancer Diagnosis, computer modeling and simulation, Computer Modeling, diagnosing disease

Computer Modeling Could Lead to New Method for Detecting, Managing Prostate Cancer

A new study coauthored by BYU researchers may lead to a more accurate system for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. It’s a promising development given prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men worldwide, responsible for 308,000 deaths in 2012 and estimated to take 26,120 lives in the U.S. alone in 2016.

Medicine

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Medical Research, Neonatology, Telemedicine, Dr. Jennifer Fang, Mayo Clinic Center for Connected Care

Emergency Video Telemedicine Positively Impacts Newborn Resuscitation

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Approximately 10 percent of newborns require help breathing after birth, and 1 in 1,000 newborns require more intensive resuscitation measures. These infrequent, high-risk deliveries may present challenges to community hospitals less familiar with advanced newborn resuscitation interventions. Telemedicine consultations are a good option to help meet these challenges and positively impact patient care, according to a study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Medicine

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Common Probiotics Can Reduce Stress Levels, Lessen Anxiety

Studying how gut bacteria affect behavior in zebrafish could lead to a better understanding of how probiotics may affect the central nervous system in humans.

Medicine

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Sneeze, Texas A&M Health Science Center

The Best Way to Cover Your Sneeze

It’s normal to sneeze: It’s the body’s natural reflex to an invader—whether pollen, cat hair or a virus that leads to the common cold—in your nose linings. No matter the cause, your sneezes spread germs, and it’s best to catch them the correct way to prevent spreading illness.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Linac Coherent Light Source, X-ray science, LCLS , lightsource, Photosynthesis, photosystem II

New, Detailed Snapshots Capture Photosynthesis at Room Temperature

New X-ray methods at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the highest resolution room-temperature images of protein complex photosystem II, which allows scientists to closely watch how water is split during photosynthesis at the temperature at which it occurs naturally.

Science

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Stem Cells, pluripotent stem cells, Intestines, enteric nervous system, Nature Medicine, Gastroinestinal, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, National Institutes of Health, Stomach, regenerative therapy, personalized medicine, press release, Pediatrics, Hirschsprung disease, Hirschsprung

Scientists Tissue Engineer Human Intestines and Functioning Nerves

Scientists report in Nature Medicine using human pluripotent stem cells to grow human intestinal tissues that have functioning nerves in a laboratory, and then using these to recreate and study a severe intestinal nerve disorder called Hirschsprung’s disease.

Science

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x-ray laser, Photosynthesis

X-Rays Capture Unprecedented Images of Photosynthesis in Action

An international team of scientists is providing new insight into the process by which plants use light to split water and create oxygen. In experiments led by Berkeley Lab scientists, ultrafast X-ray lasers were able to capture atomic-scale images of a protein complex found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria at room temperature.

Medicine

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lung-map, Lung Cancer, Yale Cancer Center, Herbst, Clinical Trial, SWOG

Lung-MAP Clinical Trial is helping Patients with Lung Cancer

Lung-MAP (SWOG S1400) is a multi-drug, multi-sub-study, biomarker-driven squamous cell lung cancer clinical trial that uses state-of-the-art genomic profiling to match patients to sub-studies testing investigational treatments that may target the genomic alterations, or mutations, found to be driving the growth of their cancer.

Science

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cat tongue, Velcro, hooks, Fasteners, Biomimetic, grip, Fluid Dynamics, Alexis Noel, Andrea Martinez, Hyewon Jung, Ting-Wen Tsai , David Hu, Georgia Tech, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, American Physical Society, APS

Cat Tongues Are Even 'Handier' Than You Imagined

Have you ever taken a good look at a cat’s tongue? If so, you may have noticed the tiny, sharp “spines” on its surface.







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