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Science

Cornell, Gerontology, Nurse, Supervisors, Long Term, care, Leadership, Supervisory, Skills

Gerontologist's book for nursing home leaders

A New handbook, "Leading the Way," co-authored by Cornell gerontologist Karl Pillemer, helps nursing supervisors in long-term care facilities develop leadership skills.

Science

Trends, Race, Class, Ability, SATs, Psa Ts, Intelligence, Cornell, Bell, Curve

Race and class intelligence gaps groups narrowed

Intelligence test scores among racial and socio-economic segments of American society are not growing ever wider, contrary to arguments in The Bell Curve, but are, in fact, converging, say Cornell University psychologists Wendy M. Williams and Stephen J. Ceci, based on analyses of national data sets of mental test scores. This is contrary to often-reported arguments that Americans are getting dumber because low-IQ parents are outbreeding high-IQ parents.

Business

work, Jobs, Transfer, Gender, Psychology

Women and Employees with Working Spouses Given Fewer Chances for Job Relocation, According to New Study

Women and employees with working spouses may be offered fewer chances to relocate because of a not-so-subtle bias among employers, according to a new study led by a researcher at the University of Georgia.

Medicine

Cancer, Leukemia, New Treatments, Brain Tumor, Three Dimensional Imaging

New Cancer Treatments May Improve Survival Rates, Reduce Radiation Side Effects

Doctors at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital today announced new brain tumor research protocols they hope will improve survival rates and reduce side effects of radiation therapy among pediatric cancer patients.

Science

Antarctica, Research, Season, Biology, Astrophysics, Meteorology, Oceanography

1997-98 Antarctic Research Season Underway

A new research season is underway in Antarctica, encompassing 175 research projects supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the federal agency that funds and manages the U.S. Antarctic Program.

Medicine

Blood, test, Lipoproteins, Cholesterol, HDL, LDL, Heart, Disease

New Blood Test More Accurately Measures Risk of Heart Disease

A North Carolina State University biochemist has developed a blood test that provides a quicker and much more accurate way of predicting the likelihood of heart disease than other blood analysis methods.

Science

NSF, Computer, Linking, Grant, Avrunin, U Mass

UMass Professor Wins $1.4 Million Grant from NSF for Computer Linking Research

George Avrunin, professor of mathematics and statistics at the University of Massachusetts, has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation for research on the effective linking of computer systems. He is working in conjunction with UMass computer science professors Lori Clarke and Leon Osterweil. The group's research could eventually be used in the development of computer systems used in areas such as air traffic control, airline reservation systems, and the monitoring of hospital patients.

Science

NSF, YEAR, 2000, Millenium, bug, Science, Research

UW professor to coordinate National Science Foundation's external year 2000 efforts

The National Science Foundation has appointed University of Washington Professor Mark Haselkorn to coordinate its external efforts to address the year 2000 computer problem.

Medicine

Leukemia, Cancer, Gene Transcription, Genetics, Genetics, Chimeric Proteins

Abnormal Gene Transcription and Acute Leukemia

Research over the past 10 years has shown that acute leukemia is in fact a genetic disorder. It arises when genes essential to correct blood cell function are not expressed at the appropriate times. In many cases, the failure of gene expression can be traced to an altered protein known as a transcription factor.

Science

Purdue, Genetics, Phosphorus, Plants, Agriculture, soil

Researcher Discovers Plant Genes for Phosphate Uptake

Spurred by predictions that we may have only 90 years of high-quality rock phosphate fertilizer left, Purdue University researchers have taken a step toward helping plants get the nutrient out of soil. They were the first to isolate genes that help plant roots take up phosphate, a common form of phosphorus.

Science

Business

Foodprocess, Foodscience, Horticulture, Farming, Agribusiness, Producers, Forecasts, Agriculture

Purdue Forecasts Food Systems For The Next Century

Faculty in the Purdue University School of Agriculture give a better-than-educated guess of what the future holds for American food and fiber industries with a new book and video set entitled "FoodSystem 21: Gearing Up for the New Millennium." Purdue Agricultural economist Mike Boehlje calls it "a frank and brutal look" at where farms, input suppliers, processors and consumers are heading.

Science

Medicine, Technology, LIFE, SCI, Social, Physiology

New Scientist Highlights

Highlights of New Scientist for Nov 6, 1997.

Medicine

Open, Heart, Surgery, White, Blood, Cells, Cardiac

Open-Heart Surgery: Study Shows New Approaches Significantly Improve Outcomes

A new study has found that filtering leukocytes (white blood cells) out of transfused blood and blood that passes through a heart-lung machine during cardiac surgery resulted in significantly decreased length of stay and therefore, cost of care, for a majority of patients.

Science

Science Policy, Science Board, Meeting

National Science Board to Meet

The National Science Board (NSB) will meet on Wednesday, November 12 through Friday, November 14, 1997 at National Science Foundation headquarters in Arlington, Virginia. Sessions open to the public include: Thursday, November 13, from 2:20 p.m.-5:45 p.m. and Friday, November 14 from 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Medicine

Diabetes, Disease Management, Costs, Savings, Managed Care, Outcomes

New Data Show That Investing in Diabetes Care Now Can Save Money

Initial outcomes for participants in Diabetes Treatment Centers of America's (DTCA) comprehensive health care management system, Diabetes NetCareTM, show a 26%, or $141 per member per month, reduction in direct health care costs within six months of implementation, according to the current issue of Managed Healthcare magazine.

Medicine

Johns, Hopkins, Medicine, Heart, Failure, Exercise, Heart, Disease, Elderly

Exercise Improves Heart Function In Elderly People With Heart Failure

Older people with chronic congestive heart failure can significantly improve their functional independence by exercising moderately three times a week, according to a study led by Johns Hopkins physicians.

Science

fish, Salmon, Ecology, Ocean, Rivers, Atlantic, Fisheries

UC Santa Cruz ecologist at forefront of salmon research

The number of Atlantic salmon in American rivers has dropped dramatically in recent years. UC Santa Cruz ecologist Marc Mangel is probing the biological and environmental factors that trigger the salmon's patterns of migration and spawning.

Science

Weather, Meteorology, Atmospheric, Sciences

The world's most detailed weather system gives forecasters a close-up view of local conditions

A supercomputer is ushering in a new era of high-precision weather forecasting. The University of Washington has switched on the latest version of its MM5 weather forecasting system, the world's first to diagnose and forecast local weather on a scale of a few thousand yards. The four-kilometer system can follow a region's topography so accurately that it can "see" rain showers on one side of a mountain and the rain shadow on the other.

Medicine

Chromium, Vitamins, Diabetes, Prevention, Supplements

Chromium Supplements Have Positive Effect on Diabetes

A daily supplement of 1000 micrograms (mcg) of chromium picolinate can have "pronounced" beneficial effects on the management of adult-onset diabetes, according to a new study published in the November Diabetes, the journal of the American Diabetes Association.

Medicine

Folic Acid, Dissolution, usp, Vitamins

Most Multivitamin Products Meet Usp Dissolution Test

There is no established correlation between the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) dissolution test and the body's ability to absorb multivitamin supplements. None the less, The Tufts University Health and Nutrition Letter tries hard to make a story out of the fact that two out of ten brands of multivitamins failed to pass a USP dissolution test.







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