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  • Over the last decade, the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) and US collaborators have studied the environmental and climate changes of the western Arctic Ocean and has witnessed rapid expansion of the “acidified” water in the upper water column. This photo shows the science team working on an ice station in front of the icebreaker Xuelong during the summer 2010 cruise in the northern Canada Basin. It is at 88.22 degree norther, very close to the north pole.
    Photo by Zhongyong Gao, Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration (SOA) of China, Xiamen, China
    Over the last decade, the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) and US collaborators have studied the environmental and climate changes of the western Arctic Ocean and has witnessed rapid expansion of the “acidified” water in the upper water column. This photo shows the science team working on an ice station in front of the icebreaker Xuelong during the summer 2010 cruise in the northern Canada Basin. It is at 88.22 degree norther, very close to the north pole.
  • UD post-doctoral researcher Baoshan Chen (pictured left) takes water samples of a melting pond on an ice station on the northern Arctic Ocean Basin with a Chinese collaborator.
    Photo by Zhongyong Gao and Di Qi / Third Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration of China
    UD post-doctoral researcher Baoshan Chen (pictured left) takes water samples of a melting pond on an ice station on the northern Arctic Ocean Basin with a Chinese collaborator.
  • Arctic ocean ice melt in the summer, once found only in shallow waters of depths less than 650 feet or 200 meters, now spreads further into the Arctic Ocean. “It’s like a melting pond floating on the Arctic Ocean. It’s a thin water mass that exchanges carbon dioxide rapidly with the atmosphere above, causing carbon dioxide and acidity to increase in the meltwater on top of the seawater,” says Wei-Jun Cai, a professor at the University of Delaware.
    Photo by Zhongyong Gao and Di Qi / Third Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration of China
    Arctic ocean ice melt in the summer, once found only in shallow waters of depths less than 650 feet or 200 meters, now spreads further into the Arctic Ocean. “It’s like a melting pond floating on the Arctic Ocean. It’s a thin water mass that exchanges carbon dioxide rapidly with the atmosphere above, causing carbon dioxide and acidity to increase in the meltwater on top of the seawater,” says Wei-Jun Cai, a professor at the University of Delaware.
  • The above graphic illustrates the ocean acidification depth and area.
    Tammy Beeson/ University of Delaware
    The above graphic illustrates the ocean acidification depth and area.
  • In recent years, melting sea ice has allowed more of the Pacific water to flow through the Bering Strait into the Arctic Ocean. Pacific Ocean water is already high in carbon dioxide and has higher acidity.
    Photo by Zhongyong Gao and Di Qi / Third Institute of Oceanography of State Oceanic Administration of China
    In recent years, melting sea ice has allowed more of the Pacific water to flow through the Bering Strait into the Arctic Ocean. Pacific Ocean water is already high in carbon dioxide and has higher acidity.




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