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  • Screenshot from the mobile game, Justice.exe, produced by students at the University of Utah to teach players how software algorithms used in judicial could be biased like humans.
    University of Utah
    Screenshot from the mobile game, Justice.exe, produced by students at the University of Utah to teach players how software algorithms used in judicial could be biased like humans.
  • University of Utah honors and law professor (lecturer) Randy Dryer, right, and University of Utah School of Computing associate professor Suresh Venkatasubramanian, center, teach an honors class on how software algorithms used in judicial courts to evaluate defendants could be biased like humans. The class has created a mobile game called Justice.exe that teaches the player how such algorithms could be flawed.
    University of Utah
    University of Utah honors and law professor (lecturer) Randy Dryer, right, and University of Utah School of Computing associate professor Suresh Venkatasubramanian, center, teach an honors class on how software algorithms used in judicial courts to evaluate defendants could be biased like humans. The class has created a mobile game called Justice.exe that teaches the player how such algorithms could be flawed.




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