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Article ID: 698868

Mount Sinai Receives $4 Million Grant to Study Use of Inhaled Corticosteroids for Sickle Cell Treatment

Mount Sinai Health System

The Departments of Emergency Medicine and Hematology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have been awarded a $4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health toward further study of inhaled corticosteroids to treat sickle cell disease (SCD) in individuals who do not have asthma.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 10:45 AM EDT
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    10-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698762

Global Funding for Adolescent Health Misses the Target

Harvard Medical School

Adolescents make up more than a quarter of the population in developing countries. Only 1.6 percent of global development assistance for health from 2003-2016 went to adolescent health. Resource allocation failed to address many of the diseases that take the worst toll on adolescent health, such as depressive disorders, anemia and injuries.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698801

Epigenetic Reprogramming of Human Hearts Found in Congestive Heart Failure

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of heart failure. This points the way toward future personalized care.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698780

Discovery Could Lead to Better Treatment for Leukemia

University of Illinois at Chicago

Previous research has revealed that patients with acute myeloid leukemia who also have a particular mutation in a gene called NPM1 have a higher rate of remission with chemotherapy. About one-third of leukemia patients possess this favorable mutation, but until now, how it helps improve outcomes has remained unknown.Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago report on how this mutation helps improve sensitivity to chemotherapy in patients in the journal JCI Insight.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698695

First FDA-Approved Study of Focused Ultrasound to Open Blood-Brain Barrier

University of Maryland Medical Center/School of Medicine

In the first such clinical trial in the United States, physician-scientists with the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) are investigating the use of MRI-guided focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. The trial will be conducted with patients undergoing brain cancer surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC).

Released:
9-Aug-2018 9:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698761

An Ancient Medicine Shows New Promise: Arsenic in Combination with an Existing Drug Could Combat Cancer

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Investigators have discovered that arsenic in combination with an existing leukemia drug work together to target a master cancer regulator. The team, led by researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, is hopeful that the discovery could lead to new treatment strategies for diverse types of cancer.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698735

Genetic Mutations of Appendix Cancer Identified, May Impact Treatment

University of California San Diego Health

To understand why some patients with appendix cancer respond to standard treatment while others do not, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine, performed genetic profiling on 703 appendiceal tumors — the largest such study of this disease to date — to compare mutations present in both cancer types.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698707

Mount Sinai Researchers Create RNA and DNA-Sequencing Platform to Match Broader Swath of Cancer Drugs to Patients With Few Options

Mount Sinai Health System

A comprehensive RNA and DNA sequencing platform benefits late-stage and drug-resistant multiple myeloma patients by determining which drugs would work best for them, according to results from a clinical trial published in JCO Precision Oncology in August.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698709

Cleveland Clinic Researchers Receive $4.7M NIH Grant to Prevent Cancer-Associated Thrombosis

Cleveland Clinic

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, awarded a $4.7 million grant to Cleveland Clinic to study the prevention of life-threatening, cancer-associated blood clots. The new funding will support a Cleveland Clinic-led research consortium, which will focus on developing strategies to prevent cancer-associated thrombosis (blood clot formation), a potential side effect of cancer treatment.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698649

First In-Human Clinical Trial Targeting CD4 Protein for Aggressive T-cell Leukemia and Lymphoma to be Launched

Stony Brook University

Stony Brook University, iCell Gene Therapeutics and University of Louisville collaborate to offer a new CAR T immunotherapy to treat patients.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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