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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Apr-2021 5:30 PM EDT

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Newswise: 040721-ber-groundwater-bacteria.jpg?itok=WYNkorNg
Released: 14-Apr-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Calculating “Run and Tumble” Behavior of Bacteria in Groundwater
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Bacteria in groundwater move in surprising ways. They can passively ride flowing groundwater and can actively move on their own in what scientists call “run and tumble” behavior. Scientists studied two kinds of microorganisms to improve the mathematical models that describe how bacterial run and tumble when transported by groundwater.

Newswise: 040821-ber-metabolic-regulation.jpg?itok=hkpV3hr1
Released: 14-Apr-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Studying Metabolic Regulation Through Cellular Properties
Department of Energy, Office of Science

During cellular metabolism, enzymes break down and build fats, proteins, energy carriers, and genetic information. These processes happen through a complex network of reactions. Until now, studies to identify specific reactions that regulate the overall flow through a network were too complex to do regularly. Now scientists have developed new methods that combine cutting-edge techniques to predict which enzymes control common biochemical pathways.

Newswise: 040921-ber-microbes.jpg?itok=zNQAgpTW
Released: 14-Apr-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Compound Communicates More than Expected in Microbes
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Microbes use chemical signals to exchange information with their plant hosts. These signals initiate symbiotic associations. Scientists believe some of these chemical signals are unique and are specialized for specific purposes or audiences. One example is the compounds called lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs). Researchers previously believed that LCOs are for specific fungi, but new research shows that these compounds are ubiquitous.

Newswise: Little swirling mysteries: New research uncovers dynamics of ultrasmall, ultrafast groups of atoms
Released: 14-Apr-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Little swirling mysteries: New research uncovers dynamics of ultrasmall, ultrafast groups of atoms
Argonne National Laboratory

Exploring and manipulating the behavior of polar vortices in material may lead to new technology for faster data transfer and storage. Researchers used the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne and the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC to learn more.

Newswise: 040621-np-sterile-neutrinos.jpg?itok=W8pd35T5
Released: 14-Apr-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Hunting for Sterile Neutrinos with Quantum Sensors
Department of Energy, Office of Science

An international team has performed one of the world’s most sensitive laboratory searches for a hypothetical subatomic particle called the “sterile neutrino.” The novel experiment uses radioactive beryllium-7 atoms created at the TRIUMF facility in Canada. The research team then implants these atoms into sensitive superconductors cooled to near absolute-zero.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 20-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 20-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: 261776_web.jpg
Released: 14-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Partial shade from solar panels increase abundance of flowers in late summer
Oregon State University

A new study by Oregon State University researchers found that shade provided by solar panels increased the abundance of flowers under the panels and delayed the timing of their bloom, both findings that could aid the agricultural community.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Over 1,200 Coastal Scientists and Managers Engage During Virtual Gulf of Mexico Conference
Gulf of Mexico Alliance

Today, over 1,200 coastal scientists, managers, and professionals from federal and state agencies, academia, non-profits, and industry came together for a virtual event launching the new Gulf of Mexico Conference (GoMCon). The Gulf of Mexico Alliance hosted this event in partnership with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative and Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies.

Newswise: 261787_web.jpg
Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Superbug killer: New nanotech destroys bacteria and fungal cells
Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University

Researchers have developed a new superbug-destroying coating that could be used on wound dressings and implants to prevent and treat potentially deadly bacterial and fungal infections.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Telescopes unite in unprecedented observations of famous black hole
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

In April 2019, scientists released the first image of a black hole in galaxy M87 using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). However, that remarkable achievement was just the beginning of the science story to be told.

Newswise: Using sound waves to make patterns that never repeat
Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Using sound waves to make patterns that never repeat
University of Utah

Mathematicians and engineers at the University of Utah have teamed up to show how ultrasound waves can organize carbon particles in water into a sort of pattern that never repeats. The results, they say, could result in materials called “quasicrystals” with custom magnetic or electrical properties.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Auxin makes the spirals in gerbera inflorescences follow the Fibonacci sequence
University of Helsinki

When people are asked to draw the flower of a sunflower plant, almost everyone draws a large circle encircled by yellow petals.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Biodiversity Research Institute Announces New Consulting Division: BRI Environmental
Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI)

Biodiversity Research Institute announces the formation of its new environmental consulting services division—BRI Environmental offering a full suite of services for evaluating and permitting renewable energy development projects, infrastructure projects, marine installations, as well as residential and commercial development.

Newswise: 261790_web.jpg
Released: 14-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
A novel, quick, and easy system for genetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2
Osaka University

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Houston Advanced Research Center Receives $600,000 Grant to Examine the Resilience of Power Systems to Climate Change
Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC)

Funds will support team of multidisciplinary researchers to develop a climate risk modeling framework to improve resilience of power systems.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Climate change is making Indian monsoon seasons more chaotic
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

If global warming continues unchecked, summer monsoon rainfall in India will become stronger and more erratic.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Bacteria May Be the Key To Understanding the Health of Aquatic Ecosystems
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In a new project, a research team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will build biosensors using bacteria that can sense and communicate levels of nutrients in a body of water with enhanced levels of sensitivity, scalability, and versatility. The effort, supported by a nearly $375,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, is being led by Shayla Sawyer, an associate professor of electrical, computer, and systems engineering at Rensselaer.

Newswise: From Smoky Skies to a Green Horizon: Scientists Convert Fire-Risk Wood into Biofuel
Released: 14-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
From Smoky Skies to a Green Horizon: Scientists Convert Fire-Risk Wood into Biofuel
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Reliance on petroleum fuels and raging wildfires: Two separate, large-scale challenges that could be addressed by one scientific breakthrough. Researchers from two national laboratories have collaborated to develop a streamlined and efficient process for converting woody plant matter like forest overgrowth and agricultural waste – material that is currently burned either intentionally or unintentionally – into liquid biofuel.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Social wasps lose face recognition abilities in isolation
Cornell University

Just as humans are challenged from the social isolation caused by the coronavirus pandemic, a new study finds that a solitary lifestyle has profound effects on the brains of a social insect: paper wasps.

Newswise: GIS technology helps map out how America’s mafia networks were ‘connected’
Released: 14-Apr-2021 10:50 AM EDT
GIS technology helps map out how America’s mafia networks were ‘connected’
Penn State Institute for Computational and Data Sciences

A team of researchers used geographic information systems — a collection of tools for geographic mapping and analysis of the Earth and society — and data from a government database on mafia ties during the 1960s, to examine how these networks were built, maintained and grown. The researchers said that this spatial social networks study offers a unique look at the mafia’s loosely affiliated criminal groups. Often called families, these groups were connected — internally and externally — to maintain a balance between security and effectiveness, referred to as the efficiency-security tradeoff.

Newswise: Suppression of COVID-19 Waves Reflects Time-Dependent Social Activity, Not Herd Immunity
Released: 14-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Suppression of COVID-19 Waves Reflects Time-Dependent Social Activity, Not Herd Immunity
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists developed a new mathematical model for predicting how COVID-19 spreads, accounting for individuals’ varying biological susceptibility and levels of social activity, which naturally change over time.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Research to Prevent Blindness and The Glaucoma Foundation Offer Critical Funding for Early-Career Vision Scientists
Research to Prevent Blindness

Research to Prevent Blindness and The Glaucoma Foundation are pleased to announce a new round of grants, the Career Advancement Awards (CAAs), that support early-career researchers as they seek new knowledge related to eye diseases.

Newswise: It Takes a Community to Fight Climate Change
Released: 14-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
It Takes a Community to Fight Climate Change
Monday Campaigns

How can a community and a group of volunteers encourage fellow citizens to shift to a climate-friendly diet?

Newswise: Multi-wavelength Observations Reveal Impact of Black Hole on M87 Galaxy
Released: 14-Apr-2021 5:00 AM EDT
Multi-wavelength Observations Reveal Impact of Black Hole on M87 Galaxy
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

A multiwavelength campaign of observations gave astronomers a "big picture" view of the region near the galaxy M87's supermassive black hole and also the distant regions it affects.

Newswise: New method measures super-fast, free electron laser pulses
Released: 14-Apr-2021 12:05 AM EDT
New method measures super-fast, free electron laser pulses
Los Alamos National Laboratory

New research shows how to measure the super-short bursts of high-frequency light emitted from free electron lasers (FELs).

Newswise:Video Embedded pathways-clear-for-decarbonising-heavy-industry
VIDEO
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 PM EDT
Pathways clear for decarbonising heavy industry
University of Adelaide

The production of green steel will be a critical step to enable the world’s heavy industry to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and Australia is well placed to be an important player in this space.

Newswise: NUS researchers create SmartFarm device to harvest air moisture for autonomous, self-sustaining urban farming
Released: 13-Apr-2021 9:05 PM EDT
NUS researchers create SmartFarm device to harvest air moisture for autonomous, self-sustaining urban farming
National University of Singapore

Researchers from the NUS Department of Materials Science and Engineering have created a solar-powered, fully automated device called ‘SmartFarm’ that is equipped with a moisture-attracting material to absorb air moisture at night when the relative humidity is higher, and releases water when exposed to sunlight in the day for irrigation.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 5:05 PM EDT
The Chillest Ape: How Humans Evolved A Super-High Cooling Capacity
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Humans have a uniquely high density of sweat glands embedded in their skin—10 times the density of chimpanzees and macaques. Now, researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered how this distinctive, hyper-cooling trait evolved in the human genome.

Newswise: Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock Hard Skeletons
Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:30 PM EDT
Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock Hard Skeletons
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Charles Darwin, the British naturalist who championed the theory of evolution, noted that corals form far-reaching structures, largely made of limestone, that surround tropical islands. He didn’t know how they performed this feat. Now, Rutgers scientists have shown that coral structures consist of a biomineral containing a highly organized organic mix of proteins that resembles what is in our bones. Their study, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, shows for the first time that several proteins are organized spatially – a process that’s critical to forming a rock-hard coral skeleton.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Study: Ag policy in India needs to account for domestic workload
Cornell University

Women’s increased agricultural labor during harvest season, in addition to domestic house care, often comes at the cost of their health, according to new research from the Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture and Nutrition.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
DHS Partners with DWX to Advance Homeland Security Solutions
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

To keep pace with rapidly emerging technologies, DHS S&T is partnering with DEFENSEWERX (DWX), a nonprofit organization focused on cultivating ecosystems that enable the acceleration of innovative solutions to benefit the nation.

Newswise: ORNL’s Honeycutt, Horvath Named SME 2021 Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineers
Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
ORNL’s Honeycutt, Horvath Named SME 2021 Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineers
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Andrew Honeycutt and Nick Horvath, machine tool researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have been selected to receive the 2021 Geoffrey Boothroyd Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from SME, the professional manufacturing engineering association.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:00 PM EDT
Researchers Streamline Molecular Assembly Line to Design, Test Drug Compounds
North Carolina State University

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a way to fine-tune the molecular assembly line that creates antibiotics via engineered biosynthesis.

Newswise: Plasma device designed for consumers can quickly disinfect surfaces
Released: 13-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Plasma device designed for consumers can quickly disinfect surfaces
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

The COVID-19 pandemic has cast a harsh light on the urgent need for quick and easy techniques to sanitize and disinfect everyday high-touch objects such as doorknobs, pens, pencils, and personal protective gear worn to keep infections from spreading.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
‘Our Changing Menu’: Warming climate serves up meal remake
Cornell University

How will climate change affect the world’s dinner plates?

Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Department of Energy to Provide $25 Million toward Development of a Quantum Internet
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Today the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a plan to provide $25 million for basic research toward the development of a quantum internet.

Newswise: 041321-blog-puredata.jpg?itok=5ypFi5di
Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Introducing SC Public Reusable Research (PuRe) Data Resources
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The Department of Energy Office of Science (SC) supports the scientific community by allocating research funding, providing access to state-of-the art scientific user facilities, and stewarding community data.

Newswise: Study cements age and location of hotly debated skull from early human Homo erectus
Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Study cements age and location of hotly debated skull from early human Homo erectus
American Museum of Natural History

Scientists also find two new, nearly 2-million-year-old specimens--likely the earliest pieces of the H. erectus skeleton yet discovered

Newswise: Narratives Can Help Science Counter Misinformation on Vaccines
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Narratives Can Help Science Counter Misinformation on Vaccines
Iowa State University

Narratives are a powerful tool that can help explain complex issues, but they can also serve as sources of misinformation, which presents a challenge as public health agencies work to educate people about COVID-19 vaccine.

Newswise: Sprint – A new NEST unit under construction
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Sprint – A new NEST unit under construction
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

At NEST, the research and innovation platform of Empa and Eawag, the new Sprint unit is currently under construction – an office unit built largely from recycled materials. Sprint aims to set new standards for circular construction. However, the office unit is also a reaction to the current COVID-19 situation, which made it clear that we need to adapt our buildings more flexibly and quickly to changing needs.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 13-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.


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