Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 1802
BES-2018-06-e-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 696330

As Future Batteries, Hybrid Supercapacitors Are Super-Charged

Department of Energy, Office of Science

A new supercapacitor could be a competitive alternative to lithium-ion batteries.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 3:25 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
BES-2018-06-d-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 696324

Forever Young Catalyst Reduces Diesel Emissions

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Atom probe tomography reveals key explanations for stable performance over a cutting-edge diesel-exhaust catalyst’s lifetime.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
BES-2018-06-c-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 696313

Sense Like a Shark: Saltwater-Submersible Films

Department of Energy, Office of Science

A nickelate thin film senses electric field changes analogous to the electroreception sensing organ in sharks, which detects the bioelectric fields of prey.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
BES-2018-06-b-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 696253

A Bit of Quantum Logic—What Did the Atom Say to the Quantum Dot?

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Let’s talk! Scientists demonstrate coherent coupling between a quantum dot and a donor atom in silicon, vital for moving information inside quantum computers.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 696407

Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cages

Cornell University

In a paper published in Nature, a team led by Uli Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University, reports discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures – 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites

Article ID: 696399

Chameleon-Inspired Nanolaser Changes Colors

Northwestern University

• Chameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin • Northwestern’s nanolaser changes color similarly — by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles • By stretching and releasing an elastic substrate, the nanoparticles move further apart or closer together to control color

Released:
20-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
SpontaneouslypartiallyoxidizedMXene.jpg

Article ID: 696302

Not always bad — MXenes’ spontaneous oxidation harnessed to create 2-D nanocomposites

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have discovered a new way to harness the potential of a type of spontaneously oxidized MXene thin films, to create nanocomposites that could sense both light and the environment. Previously, such spontaneous oxidation was considered detrimental because it degrades the MXene structure. The research is published in the June 2018 issue of ACS Nano, one of Google Scholar’s top-rated, peer-reviewed scientific journals.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
OCH-photo.jpg

Article ID: 696250

Carbon Nanotube Optics Poised to Provide Pathway to Optical-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Computing

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week’s edition of the journal Nature Materials.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
SEM-TEM-nanoparticle-scale-bars.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696106

Scientists Create Continuously Emitting Microlasers With Nanoparticle-Coated Beads

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood serum.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 1:50 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 696148

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive

University of California San Diego

Graphene electrodes could enable higher quality brain imaging thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at UC San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (calcium ion spikes) at of large groups of neurons and individual brain cells.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

110 of 1802





Chat now!