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Article ID: 693532

NUS Engineers Develop Novel Method for Resolving Spin Texture of Topological Surface States Using Transport Measurements

National University of Singapore

A research breakthrough from the National University of Singapore has revealed a close relation between the spin texture of topological surface states and a new kind of magneto-resistance. The team’s finding could help in addressing the issue of spin current source selection often faced in the development of spintronic devices.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693478

Unusual Magnetic Structure May Support Next-Generation Technology

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers from Colorado State University are using neutrons to study a material with an unusual magnetic structure. This research could both enhance their team’s fundamental understanding of frustrated magnetism and lead to improvements in digital information storage.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693474

Balancing Nuclear and Renewable Energy

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne researchers explore the benefits of adjusting the output of nuclear power plants according to the changing supply of renewable energy such as wind and solar power.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693454

Nuclear Radiation Detecting Device Could Lead to New Homeland Security Tool

Northwestern University

A Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory research team has developed an exceptional next-generation material for nuclear radiation detection that could provide a significantly less expensive alternative to detectors now in commercial use. Specifically, the high-performance material is used in a device that can detect gamma rays, weak signals given off by nuclear materials, and can easily identify individual radioactive isotopes. Potential uses include more widespread detectors for nuclear weapons and materials as well as applications in biomedical imaging, astronomy and spectroscopy.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693442

Watching Nanomaterials Form in 4D

Northwestern University

A team from Northwestern University and the University of Florida has developed a new type of electron microscope that takes dynamic, multi-frame videos of nanoparticles as they form, allowing researchers to view how specimens change in space and time.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693417

Cracking the Catalytic Code

Argonne National Laboratory

In a variety of research programs, Argonne experts are finding ways to make cheaper and more efficient the manufacture of products derived from shale gas deposits and identifying new routes to higher-performance.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693376

A Game Changer: Protein Clustering Powered by Supercomputers

Department of Energy, Office of Science

New algorithm lets biologists harness massively parallel supercomputers to make sense of a protein “data deluge.”

Released:
24-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693329

Early Career Award Will Advance Research on Soil as Building Material

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Michelle Bernhardt-Barry, assistant professor of civil engineering at the University of Arkansas, has received a $500,000 Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation to expand her research on the use of soil as a 3D-printed building material.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693313

A Simple Method Etches Patterns at the Atomic Scale

Penn State Materials Research Institute

A precise chemical-free method for etching nanoscale features on silicon wafers has been developed by a team from Penn State and Southwest Jiaotong University and Tsinghua University in China.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693284

Neutrons Provide Insights into Increased Performance for Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Neutron scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has revealed, in real time, the fundamental mechanisms behind the conversion of sunlight into energy in hybrid perovskite materials. A better understanding of this behavior will enable manufacturers to design solar cells with significantly increased efficiency.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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