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Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, material sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, Physical Review B, Louisiana State University, Magnet, Magnetic, Magnetism, Magnets, skyrmions, skyrmion, material design, Design, Vortex, vortex behavior, chemical pressure, Magnetic memory, spin

Chemical “Pressure” Tuning Magnetic Properties

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Unexpectedly, a little chemical substitution stabilizes unusual magnetic phase of vortexes called skyrmions.

Science

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Advanced Photon Source (APS), Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), Energy, energy usage, Energy Storage, Batteries, Lithium-ion batteries , Programs, Chemical Sciences & Engineering, Electrochemical energy storage, Synchrotron Radiation

The Wet Road to Fast and Stable Batteries

An international team of scientists —– including several researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory — – has discovered an anode battery material with superfast charging and stable operation over many thousands of cycles.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, material sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, Physical Review Letters , PRL, quantum spin, quantum spin liquid, ice, Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins University, Disorder, Chaos, quantum state, Computing, Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Physics, pra

Stirring up a Quantum Spin Liquid with Disorder

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New, unexpected paradigm discovered: Disorder may actually promote an exotic quantum state, with potential for ultrafast computing.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, material sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, National Renewable Energy Lab, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL, scientific reports, Interface, Interface Design, Interfaces, Semiconductor, Semiconducting, optical activity, Materia

Light Perfects Interfaces

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Shining light on a growing semiconductor modifies its interface with the surface and could improve the optical properties of each.

Science

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Materials Science, Nanoengineering, Social Science, sense of touch, Darren Lipomi, VS Ramachandran, UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, fundamental research

Less Than Skin Deep: Humans Can Feel Molecular Differences Between Nearly Identical Surfaces

How sensitive is the human sense of touch? Sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has shown

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Creating Surfaces That Repel Water and Control Its Flow (Video)

To prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it’s pushed away. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science

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Graphene, Semiconductor, Physics, Materials Science, Nanofabrication, Condensed Matter, Chip Fabrication, 2D materials, Nanoscale

Columbia Engineers Create Artificial Graphene in a Nanofabricated Semiconductor Structure

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Researchers at Columbia Engineering, experts at manipulating matter at the nanoscale, have made an important breakthrough in physics and materials science, recently reported in Nature Nanotechnology. Working with colleagues from Princeton and Purdue Universities and Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, the team has engineered “artificial graphene” by recreating, for the first time, the electronic structure of graphene in a semiconductor device.

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Perking Up and Crimping the ‘Bristles’ of Polyelectrolyte Brushes

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A molecular-sized brush that looks like a shoe brush has properties with great potential for the materials industry and medicine, but polyelectrolyte brushes can be sensitive, and getting them to work right tricky. New research shows what can make them break down, but also what can get them to systematically recover.

Science

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Diamond Film, Plasma, Plasma vapor deposition, Boron, materials engineering

A Diamond as the Steppingstone to New Materials, Using Plasma Physics Technology

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Physicists want to create novel compounds that surpass diamonds in heat resistance and nearly rival them in hardness. In a paper in the journal Materials, they investigate how the addition of boron, while making a diamond film via plasma vapor deposition, changes properties of the diamond material.

Science

Channels:

Graphene, Advanced Manufacturing, Materials, Coatings

Developing Advanced Graphene Materials for Industry

Research and development around new applications and industries based on the advanced material graphene – hailed as the “miracle material of the 21st century” – is the focus of a new Graphene Research Hub being launched at the University of Adelaide today.







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