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Embargo will expire:
1-May-2018 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-Apr-2018 3:40 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-May-2018 12:00 AM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693298

Breaking Bottlenecks to the Electronic-Photonic Information Technology Revolution

University of Washington

Researchers at the University of Washington, working with researchers from the ETH-Zurich, Purdue University and Virginia Commonwealth University, have achieved an optical communications breakthrough that could revolutionize information technology. They created a tiny device, smaller than a human hair, that translates electrical bits (0 and 1 of the digital language) into light, or photonic bits, at speeds 10s of times faster than current technologies.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 2:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693448

Fungal Highways on Cheese Rinds Influence Food Safety, Ripeness

Tufts University

Bacteria traveling along "fungal highways" on cheese rinds can spread more quickly and ruin quality or cause foodborne illnesses, but cheesemakers could manipulate the same highways to help cheese mature faster and taste better, according to new research from Tufts University.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693442

Watching Nanomaterials Form in 4D

Northwestern University

A team from Northwestern University and the University of Florida has developed a new type of electron microscope that takes dynamic, multi-frame videos of nanoparticles as they form, allowing researchers to view how specimens change in space and time.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693427

Virginia Tech Awarded $1.9 Million EPA Grant to Research Lead Exposure in Drinking Water

Virginia Tech

By working directly with consumers and citizen scientists, the project is designed to increase public awareness of lead in water and plumbing on a national scale.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693413

Americans’ Bedtime Habits in New Study

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A new analysis by Johns Hopkins researchers of national data gathered from physical activity monitors concludes that most Americans hit the sack later on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. Delayed bedtimes are especially pronounced for teens and young adults.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Apr-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693333

Researchers 3D Print Electronics and Cells Directly on Skin

University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 7:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693401

Removing the Enablers

Childrens Hospital Los Angeles

Investigators at the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles provide preclinical evidence that the presence of tumor-associated macrophages—a type of immune cell—can negatively affect the response to chemotherapy against neuroblastoma.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693351

In Huntington's Disease, Heart Problems Reflect Broader Effects of Abnormal Protein

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers investigating a key signaling protein in Huntington’s disease describe deleterious effects on heart function, going beyond the disease’s devastating neurological impact. By adjusting protein levels affecting an important biological pathway, the researchers improved heart function in mice, shedding light on the biology of this fatal disease.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693377

What Can a Tasty Milkshake Teach Us About the Genetics of Heart Disease?

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

A genomic analysis of a large study population has identified uncommon gene variants involved in responses to dietary fats and medicine. Although these variants are rare, they may play a large role in a carrier's risk of heart disease.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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