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Article ID: 698995

Scientists Pinpoint Brain Networks Responsible for Naming Objects

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified the brain networks that allow you to think of an object name and then verbalize that thought. The study appeared in the July issue of BRAIN. It represents a significant advance in the understanding of how the brain connects meaning to words and will help the planning of brain surgeries.

Released:
14-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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    8-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698568

New Guideline Released for Managing Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Accurate Diagnosis and Proper Management Could Improve Outcomes

Released:
3-Aug-2018 4:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698405

Expert Available to Discuss Children and Anesthesia

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Released:
1-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697876

Unless We Spot Changes, Most Life Experiences Are Fabricated From Memories

Washington University in St. Louis

We may not be able to change recent events in our lives, but how well we remember them plays a key role in how our brains model what’s happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, finds new research in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.

Released:
24-Jul-2018 4:40 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697774

Slacking on Your Savings? Cognitive Bias Could Be to Blame

Cornell University

A new study by Cornell University neuroscientists suggests that, to some degree, we can blame limited savings on our brains in addition to our bills. According to the study, humans have a cognitive bias toward earning, which makes us unconsciously spend more brain power on earning than on saving. The cognitive bias is so powerful that it can even warp our sense of time.

Released:
23-Jul-2018 1:10 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697765

Paying Parents to Read to Their Children Boosts Literacy Skills

Ohio State University

Researchers have found a surprising way to help boost the skills of children with language impairment: Pay their parents to read to them.

Released:
23-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697656

Study: ADHD Drugs Do Not Improve Cognition in Healthy College Students

University of Rhode Island

Contrary to popular belief across college campuses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications may fail to improve cognition in healthy students and actually can impair functioning, according to a study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island and Brown University.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 697450

NYU Study Uncovers Connections Between Early Childhood Program and Teenage Outcomes

New York University

A new study published in PLOS ONE by researchers from New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development examined the long-term impacts of an early childhood program in Chicago, IL called the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) and found evidence suggesting that the program positively affected children’s executive function and academic achievement during adolescence.

Released:
16-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Education

Article ID: 697397

How Looking at the Big Picture Can Lead to Better Decisions

Ohio State University

New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected.

Released:
13-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 697234

U.S. Department of Education Awards $880,000 Grant to Institute for Autism Research at Canisius College

Canisius College

Researchers at the Institute for Autism Research (IAR) at Canisius College were awarded an $880,431 grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), to fully fund a three-year study of the long-term beneficial impacts from an innovative school intervention for high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder (HFASD) developed by the IAR research team.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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