Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 987

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 689744

Expert Panel on The Future of Fish: Trade-offs Associated with California’s Seafood

California State University, Monterey Bay

A panel of experts hosted by California State University Council on Ocean Affairs, Science and Technology (COAST) will present to legislators about ocean issues and solutions for a sustainable future in Sacramento on Feb. 20, 2018.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 5:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Food Science, Government/Law, Marine Science

endangered-mussel-agrilife.jpg

Article ID: 689686

Researchers in Dallas Study Texas’ First Federally Endangered Mussel Species

Texas A&M AgriLife

A team of Texas A&M AgriLife scientists in Dallas works alongside collaborators to understand the ecology and taxonomy of Texas' first federally endangered freshwater mussel species.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Agriculture, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Local - Texas

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 689574

UCI Oceanographers Solve Mystery of Phytoplankton Survival in Nutrient-Poor Pacific

University of California, Irvine

Upwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean provides essential nutrients for the region’s microscopic plants, but iron – a key ingredient that facilitates nitrogen consumption – is in short supply. To compensate, the phytoplankton band together to recycle the scarce metal and retain it in their upper-ocean habitat, scientists at the University of California, Irvine have discovered.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 4:05 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature (journal), Local - California, All Journal News

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 689359

Innovative Restoration of Coral Reefs Helps Protect Caribbean Islands

University of California, Santa Cruz

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz and the Nature Conservancy have measured the protective role of coral reefs and field-tested a solution that reduces coastal risks by combining innovative engineering with restoration ecology.

Released:
12-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites

Channels:

All Journal News, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Local - California

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689329

Despite Odds, Fish Species That Bypasses Sexual Reproduction Is Thriving

Washington University in St. Louis

An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of the Amazon molly, a fish that reproduces asexually. The researchers expected that the asexual organism would be at a genetic disadvantage, but the Amazon molly is thriving.

Released:
9-Feb-2018 5:45 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

All Journal News, Marine Science, Nature (journal)

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 654779

Body Power Supply, Diesel Combustion Modeling, Particle Physics on Supercomputers, and More in the DOE Science News Source?

Newswise

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Released:
9-Feb-2018 5:35 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Energy, Environmental Science, Food Science, Fusion, Genetics, Geology, High Energy Physics, Infectious Diseases, Nanotechnology, Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Power, Marine Science, Particle Physics, Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Supercomputing, Technology, Local - Virginia

anchovy.jpg

Article ID: 689273

Simple Rules Can Help Fishery Managers Cope with Ecological Complexity

University of Washington

A team of ecologists and economists is the first to test whether real-life ecological interactions produce economic benefits for the fishing industry. The results were published online Jan. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 4:30 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

Economics, Environmental Science, Nature, Wildlife, Marine Science, Climate Science, PNAS, All Journal News

Botrylloides1PortsmouthHarborexperimentalpanel002.Photo1.jpg

Article ID: 689213

UNH Researchers Find Warmer Oceans Could Increase Invasive ‘Sea Squirts’

University of New Hampshire

They’re lovingly called ‘sea squirts’, but certain marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine. New research shows that with a water temperature increase of just two degrees Celsius predicted in the coming years, the invasive tunicate species Botrylloides violaceus will be able to double their reproduction.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment
sea-turtle-sanibel1.jpg

Article ID: 689145

Who’s Your Daddy? Good News for Threatened Sea Turtles

Florida Atlantic University

A groundbreaking study of sea turtle nests and hatchlings using paternity tests to uncover “who are your daddies?” is the first to document multiple paternity in loggerhead sea turtle nests in southwest Florida. What started out as a study on female sea turtle promiscuity is proving to be very good news for this female-biased species facing rising risks of extinction due to climate change.

Released:
7-Feb-2018 12:30 PM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Add Images
or Multimedia

Article ID: 689034

Farmed Seafood and Livestock Stack Up Differently Using Alternate Feed Efficiency Measure

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens).

Released:
6-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Add to Favorites
Comment

Channels:

All Journal News, Environmental Science, Food Science, Marine Science, Local - Maryland


Showing results

110 of 987





Chat now!