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Neurogastronomy, After Surgical Weight Loss, Probiotic Akkermansia and More in the Obesity News Source

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

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Cells Lacking Nuclei Struggle to Move in 3-D Environments

A study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and published in the Journal of Cell Biology examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces.

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Making Good Bacteria Better, and Easy to Track, Thanks to Genetic Engineering

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Using an approach that combines ultrasound imaging and genetic engineering of bacterial microbes, a team from California Institute of Technology (Caltech), with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), has created a powerful new system to track bacteria dispatched to deliver therapies deep inside the body.

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cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Cd4 Cells, Immune System

Novel Genomic Tools Provide New Insight Into Human Immune System

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La Jolla Institute scientists provide new insights into how so-called CD4 cytotoxic T cells arise in humans and thus could facilitate improved vaccine design.

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science communication, Science Literacy, Simons Foundation, American Society for Cell Biology, grant application, public engagement with science

New ASCB Public Engagement Grants Target Science Literacy

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Apply for ASCB’s Public Engagement Grants. Grantees will receive from $10,000 to $35,000 for bold ideas that engage local communities with the process of science and increase public scientific literacy. The application deadline is March 31.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Oral Cancer, Esophageal Cancer, genes, tumor subtypes, Gene Expression, gene similarities

Can Mice Really Mirror Humans When It Comes to Cancer?

A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer.

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Chromosomes, Genome, Mitosis, Job, Cell Division, Cell Cycle

Packing a Genome, Step-by-Step

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For the first time, scientists can see in minute-time resolution how cells package chromosomes into highly condensed structures prior to cell division.

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Bacteria Genomics, Microbiology

Researchers Create First Global Atlas of the Bacteria Living in Your Dirt

What lives in your dirt? University of Colorado Boulder researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.

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Case Western Reserve University School Of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Jonathan Stamler, Enzymes, Cell Function, Nitric Oxide, NO, SNOs, Heart Failure, Cancer, Asthma, Infection, NO synthases, S-nitrosylation, Therapeutic Targets, drug developers, Memory, Molecular Cell

Researchers Discover New Enzymes Central to Cell Function

Doctors have long treated heart attacks, improved asthma symptoms, and cured impotence by increasing levels of a single molecule in the body: nitric oxide. The tiny molecule can change how proteins function. But new research featured in Molecular Cell suggests supplementing nitric oxide—NO—is only the first step. Researchers have discovered previously unknown enzymes in the body that convert NO into “stopgap” molecules—SNOs—that then modulate proteins. The newly discovered enzymes help NO have diverse roles in cells. They may also be prime therapeutic targets to treat a range of diseases.

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The Wistar Institute Awarded More Than $1.4 Million to Create a Malaria Vaccine Through Synthetic DNA-Based Technology

Wistar is pleased to announce it has been awarded a $1,494,972 grant by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance a DNA-based vaccine candidate for protection against malarial infection utilizing a synthetic DNA platform created in the lab of David B. Weiner, Ph.D., executive vice president, director of the Vaccine & Immunotherapy Center at The Wistar Institute and the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust Professor in Cancer Research.







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