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Kidney Disease

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Dec-2017 5:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Stem Cell Therapy, Chronic Kidney Disease, amniotic fluid stem cells , extracellular vesicles, Alport Syndrome

New Cellular Approach Found to Control Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that extracellular vesicles – tiny protein-filled structures – isolated from amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) can be used to effectively slow the progression of kidney damage in mice with a type of chronic kidney disease.

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Bortezomib, Kidney Transplant

Clinical Trial Does Not Support the Use of Bortezomib for Kidney Transplant Recipients

• In a trial of kidney transplant recipients with late antibody-mediated rejection, treatment with bortezomib, a type of proteasome inhibitor, failed to improve the function of transplanted kidneys and prevent immunologic tissue injury. • Bortezomib treatment was also linked with gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicity.

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Kidney Failure, Survival

Survival Rates Are Improving for Individuals with Kidney Failure

• In the United States, the excess risk of kidney failure–related death decreased by 12% to 27% over any 5-year interval between 1995 and 2013. • Decreases in excess mortality over time were observed for all ages and both during treatment with dialysis and during time with a functioning kidney transplant.

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ASN Partners with VA Center for Innovation on My Kidney Nutrition App Features CHALLENGEWashington, DC (December 12, 2017) — Around 17% of American Adults Have Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), and the Rate of Prevalence Is Higher for US Veterans. CKD,

Around 17% of American adults have chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the rate of prevalence is higher for US Veterans. CKD, if not treated appropriately, can ultimately lead to kidney failure requiring either dialysis or a transplant.

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Kidney Disease Increases Risk of Diabetes, Study Shows

Diabetes is known to increase a person’s risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes. Further, the researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes is urea. The findings are significant because urea levels can be lowered through medication and diet, thereby allowing for improved treatment and possible prevention of diabetes.

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Kidney Transplant, Kidney, Kidney Advocacy, Liver Transplant, Kidney Transplantation, Kidney Transplants, Nephrotic Syndrome, Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, deceased donor, deceased donor liver transplant, Living Donor Kidney Transplant, Living Donor

Two Alabamians Push UAB Hospital Past Milestone of 10,000 Kidney Transplants

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The hope given from a deceased donor, and a sibling, give two kidney transplant recipients a chance to live

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Immune Cells, Kidney Disease

Study Provides Insights on Immune Cells Involved in Kidney Disease

• New research indicates that the role of dendritic cells in kidney inflammation is more complex than previously thought. Different types of dendritic cells communicate with each other to control the magnitude of the immune response. • The findings may lead to a better understanding of various types of kidney disease.

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kidney discard, Transplantation

Many Donor Kidneys that Are Discarded May Be Suitable for Transplantation

• In an analysis of pairs of kidneys from the same donor in which 1 kidney was used but the other was discarded, the kidneys that were used tended to perform well. • The majority of discarded kidneys could have potentially been transplanted with good outcomes.

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Drug Offers New Hope to Fight Relapse in People with Kidney Cancer

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Sunitinib (marketed as Sutent) a drug that has already proven highly effective as first-line treatment for people with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to also treat patients with the disease who are at high risk for tumor recurrence.







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