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Article ID: 695643

Ocean Warming, 'Junk-Food' Prey Cause of Massive Seabird Die-Off, Study Finds

University of Washington

A new University of Washington-led paper pinpoints starvation as the cause of death for hundreds of thousands of Cassin's auklet seabirds in late 2014 to early 2015.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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    4-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695371

Thank the Moon for Earth’s Lengthening Day

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A new study that reconstructs the deep history of our planet’s relationship to the moon shows that 1.4 billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just over 18 hours. This is at least in part because the moon was closer and changed the way the Earth spun around its axis.

Released:
31-May-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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    3-Jun-2018 7:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 695398

Landmark Study Finds More Breast Cancer Patients Can Safely Forgo Chemotherapy

Loyola University Health System

A 21-gene test could enable most patients with the most common type of early breast cancer to safely forgo chemotherapy, according to a landmark study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Loyola Medicine oncologist Kathy Albain, MD, is among the main co-authors.

Released:
31-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695155

Brain Scientists Identify ‘Cross Talk’ Between Neurons That Control Touch in Mice

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists report they have uncovered a previously overlooked connection between neurons in two distinct areas of the mammalian brain. The neurons, they say, control the sense of touch, and their experiments in mice offer insights into mapping brain circuitry that is responsible for normal and abnormal perception and movements linked to touch.

Released:
29-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694955

New Theory Finds “Traffic Jams” in Jet Stream Cause Abnormal Weather Patterns

University of Chicago

A study in Science offers an explanation for a mysterious and sometimes deadly weather pattern in which the jet stream, the global air currents that circle the Earth, stalls out over a region. Much like highways, the jet stream has a capacity, researchers said, and when it’s exceeded, blockages form that are remarkably similar to traffic jams—and climate forecasters can use the same math to model them both.

Released:
22-May-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695017

Lack of Paid Sick Leave Increases Poverty

Florida Atlantic University

A new study has quantified, for the first time, the relationship between lack of paid sick leave and poverty in the U.S. The data indicates that, even when controlling for education, race, sex, marital status and employment, working adults without paid sick leave are three times more likely to have incomes below the poverty line. People without paid sick leave benefits also are more likely to experience food insecurity and require welfare services.

Released:
24-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 694837

Research Suggests Sweet Potatoes Didn't Originate in the Americas

Indiana University

Sweet potatoes may seem as American as Thanksgiving, but scientists have long debated whether their plant family originated in the Old or New World. New research by an Indiana University paleobotanist suggests it originated in Asia, and much earlier than previously known.

Released:
21-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694840

LLNL-Led Team Expands Forensic Method to Identify People Using Proteins From Bones

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

A team of researchers led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a second way to use protein markers from human tissue to identify people – this time from human bones.

Released:
21-May-2018 6:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694664

Scientists Analyze First Ancient Human DNA From Southeast Asia

Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School researchers lead the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia “to a remarkable extent” Findings reveal a complex interplay among archaeology, genetics and language

Released:
16-May-2018 10:35 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694390

The Opioid Epidemic Has Boosted the Number of Organs Available for Transplant

University of Utah Health

The researchers examined 17 years of transplantation records and found no significant change in the recipients’ chance of survival when the organ donation came from victims of drug intoxication. The study publishes online on May 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
11-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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