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Article ID: 696523

Five Ways to Lower Your Skin Cancer Risk

Yale Cancer Center

Experts at Yale Cancer Center say unless you take the right precautions, sun exposure (even if you don't get scorched) can damage your skin, causing wrinkles, age spots and even skin cancer.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696370

The Medical Minute: Ways to Promote Healthy Summer Sleep Routines for Your Family

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

The lazy days of summer can be peaceful and relaxing, but they can also wreak havoc on your body’s internal clock -- and throw even the most conscientious family’s sleep schedules out of whack.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696372

Add checking your skin to summer plans

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Summer is an especially good time to check for signs of skin cancer.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696326

First day of summer means peak poison ivy season; expert offers tips for coping with this hazard

Virginia Tech

Released:
20-Jun-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696181

Chesapeake Bay: Larger-Than-Average Summer 'Dead Zone' Forecast for 2018 After Wet Spring

University of Michigan

Ecologists from the University of Michigan and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are forecasting a larger-than-average Chesapeake Bay "dead zone" in 2018, due to increased rainfall in the watershed this spring.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696155

Pediatrician Available to Comment on Summer and Sun Safety for Children

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Released:
14-Jun-2018 4:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696094

Soils Give Background to Vacation Fun

American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Headed out on vacation? Don’t forget to observe the soil along the way! Soils Matter, Soil Science Society of America’s science-based blog, can points out the soil landmarks. Bon voyage!

Released:
14-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696092

Top Tick Tips: What to Know and How to Protect Yourself

New York-Presbyterian Hospital

The summer months are upon us and people are beginning to spend more time outdoors, increasing their exposure to ticks and the diseases they may carry. Most people are familiar with Lyme disease, which if left untreated can cause an infection that spreads to the joints, the heart, and the nervous system, but what they may not know is that different species of ticks may bring different and less familiar health concerns.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 3:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696085

The Medical Minute: Preventing Hearing Damage During Summer Activities

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

For many, summer means the sweet sounds of live concerts, fireworks, lawnmowers and splashing water. To optimize the fun summer sounds, here are some preventative measures to protect your hearing during these outdoor activities.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696068

To Forecast Winter Rainfall in the Southwest, Look to New Zealand in the Summer

University of California, Irvine

El Niño was long considered a reliable tool for predicting future precipitation in the southwestern United States, but its forecasting power has diminished in recent cycles, possibly due to global climate change. In a study published today in Nature Communications, scientists and engineers at the University of California, Irvine demonstrate a new method for projecting wet or dry weather in the winter ahead.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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