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Article ID: 693448

Fungal Highways on Cheese Rinds Influence Food Safety, Ripeness

Tufts University

Bacteria traveling along "fungal highways" on cheese rinds can spread more quickly and ruin quality or cause foodborne illnesses, but cheesemakers could manipulate the same highways to help cheese mature faster and taste better, according to new research from Tufts University.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693441

Mediterranean Diet Boosts Beneficial Bacteria

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Here’s another reason to eat a Mediterranean-type diet: It’s good for your gut.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 10:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2018 3:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 692764

3-D Printed Food Could Change How We Eat

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Jin-Kyu Rhee, associate professor at Ewha Womans University in South Korea, will discuss his new research and the potential of 3-D printing technology for food production at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology annual meeting during the 2018 Experimental Biology meeting to be held April 21-25 in San Diego.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693385

You Are What Your Friends Eat

University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering

USC’s Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society’s is developing a comprehensive algorithm that provides health practitioners the tool to form real-life peer support groups based on demographic, social and health-related data self-volunteered by patients.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 693377

What Can a Tasty Milkshake Teach Us About the Genetics of Heart Disease?

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

A genomic analysis of a large study population has identified uncommon gene variants involved in responses to dietary fats and medicine. Although these variants are rare, they may play a large role in a carrier's risk of heart disease.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692671

Why Zero-Calorie Sweeteners Can Still Lead to Diabetes, Obesity

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Increased awareness of the health consequences of eating too much sugar has fueled a dramatic uptick in the consumption of zero-calorie artificial sweeteners in recent decades. However, new research finds sugar replacements can also cause health changes that are linked with diabetes and obesity, suggesting that switching from regular to diet soda may be a case of ‘out of the frying pan, into the fire.’

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693245

Body's Natural High, Prescription Drug Misuse, Health Implications of Legalized Marijuana, and More in the Marijuana News Source

Newswise

The Latest News On Marijuana Research

Released:
20-Apr-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693090

Juice Products Association Announces New Health Professionals Toolkit

Juice Products Association

The Juice Products Association has launched a new nutritional toolkit for health professionals to help them communicate information about 100% juice.

Released:
18-Apr-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692904

People with Type 2 Diabetes Who Eat Breakfast Later, More Likely to Have a Higher BMI

University of Illinois at Chicago

Being an “evening person” is linked to higher body mass indices among people with Type 2 diabetes, and having breakfast later in the day seems to be what drives this association, according to a new paper in the journal Diabetic Medicine.Obesity is common among people with Type 2 diabetes. Having an evening preference — waking up later and going to bed later — has been linked to an increased risk for obesity, but research is lacking regarding this phenomenon among people with Type 2 diabetes.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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    16-Apr-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 692587

A Foodborne Illness Outbreak Could Cost a Restaurant Millions, Study Suggests

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

Released:
11-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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