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Science

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Archaeology, Archeology, Fossils, life on Earth, Geology, Microbiology, Earth, Earth Science

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Dec-2017 3:00 PM EST

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Anthropocene Epoch

A Literary View of the Human Era: 'Anthropocene Reading'

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The Anthropocene epoch — the proposed name for this time of significant human effect on the planet and its systems — represents a new context in which to study literature. A new book of essays co-edited by a University of Washington English professor argues that literary studies, in turn, also can help us better understand the Anthropocene.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Violence, War

Violence a Matter of Scale, Not Quantity, Researchers Show

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Researchers at the University of Notre Dame studying violence found the larger the population of a society, the smaller its war group size, proportionally — which means fewer casualties in a conflict.

Science

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Archaeology, Middle East, AMS, Natufian culture, Shubayqa , Boaretto

Uncovering Varied Pathways to Agriculture

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Weizmann Institute and colleagues at the University of Copenhagen identify new dates for a 15,000-year-old site in Jordan, challenging some prevailing assumptions about the beginnings of permanent settlements

Science

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Mummies, Mummy, X-Ray

First-of-Its-Kind Mummy Study Reveals Clues to Girl’s Story

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Who is she, this little mummy girl? Northwestern University scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body was prepared 1,900 years ago in Egypt, what items she may have been buried with, the quality of her bones and what material is present in her brain cavity. As part of a comprehensive scientific investigation, the mummy traveled from Evanston to Argonne National Laboratory on Nov. 27 for an all-day X-ray scattering experiment. It was the first study of its kind performed on a human mummy.

Science

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Archeology, China, Eurasia, Fertile Crescent, Barley, Wheat, food globalization, Tibet, India, Domestication

Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet

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First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis,

Medicine

Science

Life

Business

Law and Public Policy

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Rural Health, Healthcare, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National 4-H Council, Appalachia, Health Disparities, Racial Disparities, Prevention, Health Policy

Closing the Rural Health Gap: Media Update from RWJF and Partners on Rural Health Disparities

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Rural counties continue to rank lowest among counties across the U.S., in terms of health outcomes. A group of national organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National 4-H Council are leading the way to close the rural health gap.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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John Owen, Crawford Gribben , History, Puritan Revolution, Oliver Cromwell

Queen’s University Belfast Historian Releases Biography on Oliver Cromwell’s Advisor

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An historian from Queen’s is launching a new biography on John Owen, advisor to Oliver Cromwell and one of the most important religious leaders in the Puritan Revolution.

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man's ancestors , earliest fossils of mammals from line that led to humans, eutherian mammals

Man's Earliest Ancestors Discovered In Southern England

The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings.

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Teeth, Dental, dental x-ray, Archaeology, Rickets, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency, Bones

Archaeological Researchers Find That Dental X-Rays Can Also Reveal Serious Vitamin D Problems in Living Patients

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Human teeth hold vital information about Vitamin D deficiency, a serious but often hidden condition that can now be identified by a simple dental X-ray, McMaster anthropologists Lori D’Ortenzio and Megan Brickley have found.







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