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Article ID: 700667

Turmoil Behind Primate Power Struggles Often Overlooked by Researchers

Washington University in St. Louis

Anyone who peruses relationship settings on social media knows that our interactions with other humans can be intricate, but a new study in Nature: Scientific Reports suggests that researchers may be overlooking some of these same complexities in the social relations of our closest primate relatives, such as chimpanzees and macaques.

Released:
17-Sep-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700427

Tulane Archaeologist Leads Team to Major Maya Find

Tulane University

A team of archaeologists has discovered a nearly 1,500-year old carved altar in the jungles of northern Guatemala.

Released:
12-Sep-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Arts and Humanities

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Sep-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 700389

Human Activity In Madagascar Dates Back 6,000 Years Earlier Than Thought, According To Study Led By Stony Brook University Researcher Pat Wright

Stony Brook University

Humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought based on an analysis of bones from what was once the world’s largest bird, according to a study led by Stony Brook University researcher Dr. Pat Wright and published today in the journal Science Advances.

Released:
12-Sep-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 700344

Archeology News: DNA Analysis and Artifact Finds Provide Lens into Barbarian Past

Stony Brook University

By taking extensive DNA samples from the skulls of individuals buried in two European cemeteries from the 6th Century and combining that data with artifacts, scientists are now better able to piece together how barbarians interacted with local populations during the European Migration Period.

Released:
11-Sep-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700080

Lions, Zebras and Geography, Oh My!

West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Among the lions and zebras in Tanzania in the summer heat, a West Virginia University environmental geoscience student explored the geography of the land. Weirton, West Virginia, native Francesca Basil (BA Environmental Geoscience, 2018) traveled to the East African country in summer 2018.

Released:
6-Sep-2018 8:05 AM EDT

Education

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Article ID: 700079

Religion vs. Science: Shaping Graduate Students’ Identities

West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Could graduate students’ religious beliefs prevent them from gaining confidence as scientists? A West Virginia University sociologist is exploring the conflicts between graduate students’ religious and professional identities and how those conflicts influence their career goals.

Released:
6-Sep-2018 8:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 700012

Keeping the Beat: Turtle Shells Served as Symbolic Musical Instruments for Indigenous Cultures

Florida State University

Researchers investigate the important role turtle shells played as musical instruments for indigenous cultures in the southeastern U.S.

Released:
5-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699955

Strands of Hair From Member of Franklin Expedition Provide New Clues Into Mystery Surrounding Doomed Voyage

McMaster University

A new analysis of human hair taken from the remains of one of the members of the Franklin expedition, is providing further evidence that lead poisoning was just one of many different factors contributing to the deaths of the crew, and not the primary cause, casting new doubt on the theory that has been the subject of debate amongst scientists and historians for decades.

Released:
5-Sep-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Aug-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699608

Ancient Livestock Dung Heaps Are Now African Wildlife Hotspots

Washington University in St. Louis

Often viewed as wild, naturally pristine and endangered by human encroachment, some of the African savannah’s most fertile and biologically diverse wildlife hotspots owe their vitality to heaps of dung deposited there over thousands of years by the livestock of wandering herders, suggests new research in the journal Nature.

Released:
27-Aug-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699662

Three Previously Unknown Ancient Primates Identified

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Biological anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin have described three new species of fossil primates that were previously unknown to science.

Released:
28-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT

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