Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 1551
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jun-2018 7:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 695398

Landmark Study Finds More Breast Cancer Patients Can Safely Forgo Chemotherapy

Loyola University Health System

A 21-gene test could enable most patients with the most common type of early breast cancer to safely forgo chemotherapy, according to a landmark study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Loyola Medicine oncologist Kathy Albain, MD, is among the main co-authors.

Released:
31-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
neuronssynapselighted_iStock-92039119.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695155

Brain Scientists Identify ‘Cross Talk’ Between Neurons That Control Touch in Mice

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists report they have uncovered a previously overlooked connection between neurons in two distinct areas of the mammalian brain. The neurons, they say, control the sense of touch, and their experiments in mice offer insights into mapping brain circuitry that is responsible for normal and abnormal perception and movements linked to touch.

Released:
29-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
UUHC_141216_049.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694390

The Opioid Epidemic Has Boosted the Number of Organs Available for Transplant

University of Utah Health

The researchers examined 17 years of transplantation records and found no significant change in the recipients’ chance of survival when the organ donation came from victims of drug intoxication. The study publishes online on May 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
11-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
PaulOByrneBW2018.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694558

International Study Suggests Alternative Treatment for Mild Asthma

McMaster University

People with mild asthma are often prescribed a daily treatment regimen, but up to 80 per cent do not follow the routine, using inhalers only when they have an asthma attack. Now the researchers have found an as-needed combined-drug inhaler is a viable treatment option.

Released:
14-May-2018 4:50 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
5-14-2018Kim.jpg

Article ID: 694477

Tip Sheet: Johns Hopkins Researchers Present Study Findings at Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Meeting 2018

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The annual meeting of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The SAEM 2018 meeting will bring together more than 3,000 physicians, researchers, residents and medical students from around the world.

Released:
14-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
square-dimpledprosthesis.JPG

Article ID: 694483

New Method Could Improve Longevity and Lessen Wear of Artificial Hips

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Mechanical engineering researchers have developed a method that could extend the life of an artificial hip by adding an array of microscopic indentations that increase the thickness of a lubricating film on its surface.

Released:
14-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Noisestudyimage.jpg

Article ID: 693621

Simple Treatment May Minimize Hearing Loss Triggered by Loud Noises

Keck Medicine of USC

New research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC reveals how traumatic noise damages hearing and identifies a potential way to preserve it

Released:
7-May-2018 3:40 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 694041

Increased Nerve Activity Raises Blood Pressure, Risk of Heart Disease in People with Chronic Anxiety

American Physiological Society (APS)

Sympathetic nerve activity to skeletal muscle blood vessels—a function of the nervous system that helps regulate blood pressure—increases during physiological and mental stress in people with chronic anxiety, a new study finds.

Released:
3-May-2018 4:35 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
sexual-health-web-graphic_01.png
  • Embargo expired:
    3-May-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693631

Sex After 65: Poll of Older Adults Finds Links to Health, Gender Differences, Lack of Communication with Doctors

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new poll busts stereotypes about the sex lives of older Americans – and reveals gender and health-related divides on key aspects of sexual health, while highlighting the need for more people to talk with their health providers about sexual issues.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Antibiotic-Bacteria_forweb.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    30-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693647

Bacteria’s Appetite May Be Key to Cleaning Up Antibiotic Contamination

Washington University in St. Louis

Some bacteria not only escape being killed by bacteria, they turn it into food. Until now, scientists have understood little about how bacteria manage to consume antibiotics safely, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis illuminates key steps in the process. The findings, published April 30 in Nature Chemical Biology, could lead to new ways to eliminate antibiotics from land and water, the researchers said. Environmental antibiotic contamination promotes drug resistance and undermines our ability to treat bacterial infections.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

110 of 1551





Chat now!