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Article ID: 693351

In Huntington's Disease, Heart Problems Reflect Broader Effects of Abnormal Protein

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers investigating a key signaling protein in Huntington’s disease describe deleterious effects on heart function, going beyond the disease’s devastating neurological impact. By adjusting protein levels affecting an important biological pathway, the researchers improved heart function in mice, shedding light on the biology of this fatal disease.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693377

What Can a Tasty Milkshake Teach Us About the Genetics of Heart Disease?

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

A genomic analysis of a large study population has identified uncommon gene variants involved in responses to dietary fats and medicine. Although these variants are rare, they may play a large role in a carrier's risk of heart disease.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692670

Soaking in Hot Tub Improves Health Markers in Obese Women

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

According to new research, obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may be able to improve their health outlook with a particularly enjoyable form of therapy: regular sessions in a hot tub.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693275

Reconstructing What Makes Us Tick

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A major issue that limits modeling to predict cardiac arrhythmia is that it is impossible to measure and monitor all the variables that make our hearts tick, but researchers have now developed an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to model the electrical excitations in heart muscle. Their work, appearing in Chaos, draws on partial differential equations describing excitable media and echo state networks to cross-predict variables about chaotic electrical wave propagations in cardiac tissue.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693347

Heart Disease May Only be a Matter of Time for Those with Healthy Obesity

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

People who are 30 pounds or more overweight may want to slim down a bit even if they don’t have high blood pressure or any other heart disease risk, according to scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693336

Cedars-Sinai and Stanford Children’s Health Collaborate on Heart Care

Cedars-Sinai

Physicians from Cedars-Sinai and Stanford Children’s Health are teaming up to offer the newest treatments and surgical techniques to patients born with heart defects. The new collaboration between the two prominent institutions features doctors from the Smidt Heart Institute’s Guerin Family Congenital Heart Program at Cedars-Sinai and the Betty Irene Moore Children’s Heart Center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Both teams focus on treating patients born with heart defects who require specialized care throughout their lives.

Released:
24-Apr-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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    23-Apr-2018 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693047

Drinking Affects Mouth Bacteria Linked to Diseases

NYU Langone Health

When compared with nondrinkers, men and women who had one or more alcoholic drinks per day had an overabundance of oral bacteria linked to gum disease, some cancers, and heart disease. By contrast, drinkers had fewer bacteria known to check the growth of other, harmful germs.

Released:
18-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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    23-Apr-2018 5:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 692664

Wiping Out the Gut Microbiome Could Help with Heart Failure

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

The bacteria that reside on and within our bodies are known to have a significant influence on our health. New research suggests wiping out the gut microbiota could improve heart functioning and potentially slow the cardiac damage that occurs with heart failure.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693278

New Cell Therapy Aids Heart Recovery—Without Implanting Cells

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A team led by Columbia University Biomedical Engineering Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic has designed a creative new approach to help injured hearts regenerate by applying extracellular vesicles secreted by cardiomyocytes rather than implanting the cells. The study shows that the cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (derived in turn from a small sample of blood) could be a powerful, untapped source of therapeutic microvesicles that could lead to safe and effective treatments of damaged hearts.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693182

Media Registration Now Open for TCT 2018

Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

Media registration is now open online for TCT 2018 (Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics), the annual Scientific Symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine, attracting more than 10,000 attendees from 90 countries all over the world.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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