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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 6:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 696358

Police Killings of Unarmed Black Americans Affect Mental Health of Black Community

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Black Americans are nearly three times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts, with even larger disparities among those who are unarmed. The trend is also harming the mental health of the black community, according to new research published in The Lancet from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Boston University School of Public Health.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 10:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696240

Racial/Ethnic and Sexual Minority Males Among Unhealthiest People in America, Report Finds

American Psychological Association (APA)

Men in the United States tend to have more privilege, wealth and career success than women, yet they lead shorter and unhealthier lives. This reality is compounded for men of color and sexual minority men, who are among the unhealthiest people in America, partly due to systemic oppression and discrimination, according to a report released by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:25 PM EDT
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Education

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Article ID: 696183

Skin color no small factor in diagnosis, treatment of dermatologic conditions

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

The majority of skin problems – including the most common, acne – occur in people of every ethnicity and skin color. However, the amount of melanin, which is the pigment that gives skin its color, an individual has can greatly influence their risk of and reaction to many different conditions.

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15-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696119

Racial Differences Uncovered in Debilitating Itchy Skin Condition

Johns Hopkins Medicine

An international team led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has conducted what is believed to be the largest detailed published study of people with a poorly understood skin condition known as prurigo nodularis (PN). Such studies collect information on a whole subset of people at once and at a particular point in time.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 12:20 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 696140

Black + White = Not White

University of Utah

A new study suggests that the so-called “minority bias” exerts a powerful influence — important since one in five Americans is expected to identify as multiracial by 2050. University of Utah psychology professor Jacqueline M. Chen, lead author of the study published by the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, that found observers were most likely to categorize someone who is black-white multiracial as non-white. The findings are the first to document minority bias as a guiding principle in multiracial categorization.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 695930

Can Bias Be Reversed?

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The conversation Starbucks is now leading – whether by choice or not – is one that is not, and should not, be limited to your friendly neighborhood coffee juggernaut. It’s a conversation that’s been happening quietly for decades, and in recent years has begun to echo in every corner and industry across the country, and medicine is no exception, but new research is showing that despite the skepticism around the effectiveness of training programs, they may actually have the power to teach humility, empathy, and respect.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 695875

UT-Austin’s Christine Williams Elected President of the American Sociological Association

American Sociological Association (ASA)

Christine Williams, Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas-Austin, has been elected the 111th President of the American Sociological Association (ASA), and Joya Misra, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, has been elected ASA Vice President.

Released:
8-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 695818

Lessons in corporate communication, race and diversity

Virginia Tech

Released:
7-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jun-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695436

Analysis: Survival Benefit for African-Americans with Advanced Prostate Cancer

Duke Health

Contrary to current perceptions, certain African-American men with advanced prostate cancer have as good a chance of survival as white men and might actually have a small advantage, according to a new analysis of more than 8,000 patients who participated in clinical trials.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jun-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695437

Black Patients Show Stronger Response to Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Duke Health

African-American men with advanced prostate cancer might be more responsive than white men to an anti-androgen drug and steroids, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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