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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2018 12:15 AM EST

Article ID: 689679

African Americans with Atrial Fibrillation at Significantly Higher Risk for Stroke Compared to Caucasians with the Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

African Americans with atrial fibrillation (AF) – a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to a host of dangerous complications – have a significantly higher risk of stroke than Caucasians with the condition, according to new research published today in HeartRhythm by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The new findings build on previous studies examining the impact of race on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), which is linked to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other complications. It’s well reported that African Americans have a lower risk of developing AF as compared to Caucasians, but until now, there was little data on the additional risks that come with AF for each race.

Released:
16-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 689797

Incentive Reform Key to Racial Equity in America’s Cities

Washington University in St. Louis

Tax increment financing (TIF) and other development incentives have become American cities’ primary means of encouraging local economic development. A new study by the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis finds that TIF incentives could promote racial equity by using greater transparency and more equitable targeting of the locations where tax incentives are used.

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19-Feb-2018 4:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 689782

Comic Book Expert Calls ‘Black Panther’ a ‘Cultural Milestone’ for Genre

DePaul University

Part of the reason Marvel’s “Black Panther” has seen so much success is because it came along at the right time both culturally and politically, said Blair Davis, an associate professor of media and cinema studies in DePaul University’s College of Communication. His latest book, “Comic Book Movies,” will be available April 19 through Rutgers University Press.

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19-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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Arts and Entertainment, Civil Liberties, Race, Local - Illinois

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Article ID: 689195

American University President Leads a Conversation on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion with Government, Academic Leaders

American University

American University President Leads a Conversation on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion with Government, Academic Leaders

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7-Feb-2018 5:00 PM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Education, Race, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

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Article ID: 689189

Charter Schools Are Driving Segregation In Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Charter Schools in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County are directly and indirectly undermining school district efforts to desegregate public schools, according to a new study released by the Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA with researchers at UNC Charlotte.

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7-Feb-2018 4:15 PM EST
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Article ID: 688948

A Black Pop Cultural Hero Leaps Onto the Big Screen

University of Manitoba

“Bigotry and racism are among the deadliest social ills plaguing the world today… if man is ever to be worthy of his destiny, then we must fill our hearts with tolerance.”

Released:
5-Feb-2018 12:40 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688567

Diabetes Management Greatly Improved in High-Risk Ethnic Population through Community-Based Program

NYU Langone Health

An ethnic population at high risk for Type 2 diabetes achieved significant control of the disease through participation in community-based health programs, according to a randomized controlled trial published January 31 by researchers at NYU School of Medicine’s Department of Population Health in the journal Clinical Diabetes.

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31-Jan-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688689

Sports Ethics Expert Available to Comment on Cleveland Indians Removing "Chief Wahoo" Logo from Uniforms

Ithaca College

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30-Jan-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 688365

A New Collective of Scholars Set Their Sights on Examining the Impact of Race in Marketing

American University

The Race in the Marketplace (RIM) Research Network will focus its efforts on filling the void of scholarly research on race in marketing to impact public policy and nonprofit advocacy decisions worldwide.

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23-Jan-2018 3:30 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 688295

Disparity Persists: Racial and Ethnic Minority Patients Still Less Likely Than White Patients to Get Live Donor Kidney Transplants

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Despite efforts over the past two decades to increase the number of black and Hispanic patients receiving kidney transplants from related or unrelated living donors, these racial/ethnic minority patients are still much less likely to undergo such transplants than white patients, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In fact, the investigators say, the disparities have worsened in the last 20 years.

Released:
23-Jan-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Healthcare, Race, Surgery, Transplantation, Local - Maryland, All Journal News, Grant Funded News


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