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Article ID: 689857

David A. Solá-Del Valle, M.D., Joins Mass. Eye and Ear Glaucoma Service

Massachusetts Eye and Ear

David A. Solá-Del Valle, M.D., a board-certified ophthalmologist and fellowship-trained glaucoma specialist, has recently joined the Glaucoma Service at Mass. Eye and Ear.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 3:05 PM EST
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Healthcare, Hearing, Vision, Local - Massachusetts, Local - Boston Metro

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Article ID: 689639

Hearing Loss Is Common After Infant Heart Surgery

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Children who have heart surgery as infants are at risk for hearing loss, coupled with associated risks for language, attention and cognitive problems, by age four. In a single-center group of 348 preschoolers who survived cardiac surgery, researchers found hearing loss in about 21 percent, a rate 20 times higher than is found in the general population.

Released:
15-Feb-2018 3:00 PM EST
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Cardiovascular Health, Children's Health, Hearing, Surgery, Local - Pennsylvania, All Journal News, Grant Funded News

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Article ID: 689258

Hearing Loss Linked to Poor Nutrition in Early Childhood, Study Finds

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Young adults who were undernourished as preschool children were approximately twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as their better-nourished peers, a new study suggests.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Children's Health, Food Science, Hearing, Nutrition, Local - Maryland

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Article ID: 667765

Infant Sleep Practices, Nonmedicated ADHD Treatments, Blood Infections, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Newswise

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Released:
26-Jan-2018 6:40 PM EST
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Children's Health, Local - Virginia, AIDS and HIV, Allergies, Arthritis, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune Diseases, Back to School, Behavioral Science, Bone Health, Bullying, Cancer, Cardiovascular Health, Complementary Medicine, Dermatology, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Emergency Medicine, Environmental Health, Epilepsy, Exercise and Fitness

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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 687734

Brain Imaging Predicts Language Learning in Deaf Children

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

In a new international collaborative study between The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, researchers created a machine learning algorithm that uses brain scans to predict language ability in deaf children after they receive a cochlear implant. This study’s novel use of artificial intelligence to understand brain structure underlying language development has broad reaching implications for children with developmental challenges. It was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Released:
10-Jan-2018 9:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Children's Health, Cognition and Learning, Hearing, Mental Health, Neuro, Speech & Language, Local - Illinois

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Article ID: 687714

Illnesses Caused by Recreation on the Water Costs $2.9 Billion Annually in the US

University of Illinois at Chicago

Swimming, paddling, boating and fishing account for more than 90 million cases of gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, eye and skin-related illnesses per year in the U.S. with an estimated annual cost of $2.9 billion, according to a new report by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.This is the first time the cost associated with waterborne illnesses contracted during recreational activities in the U.

Released:
9-Jan-2018 4:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Dermatology, Food and Water Safety, Hearing, Infectious Diseases, Local - Illinois

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Article ID: 669128

Your Disease Risk, Substance Abuse Treatments, Comparing Lung Cancer Treatments, and More in the Healthcare News Source

Newswise

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Released:
5-Jan-2018 3:10 PM EST
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Addiction, Aging, AIDS and HIV, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Allergies, Apps, Arthritis, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune Diseases, Blood Disorders, Bone Health, Cancer, Cardiovascular Health, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Children's Health, Complementary Medicine, Dermatology, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Drug Resistance, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Economics, Education, Emergency M

  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 687296

Specially Timed Signals Ease Tinnitus Symptoms in First Test Aimed at the Condition’s Root Cause

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Millions of Americans hear ringing in their ears -- a condition called tinnitus -- but a new study shows an experimental device could help quiet the phantom sounds by targeting unruly nerve activity in the brain. Results of the first animal tests and clinical trial of the approach resulted in a decrease in tinnitus loudness and improvement in tinnitus-related quality of life.

Released:
31-Dec-2017 7:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Hearing, Mental Health, Neuro, Grant Funded News

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Article ID: 677920

Environmental Stressors, CRISPR Treatment for Hearing Loss, Mitochondria and Cocaine Addiction, and More in the Cell Biology News Source

Newswise

The latest research and features in cell biology in the Cell Biology News Source

Released:
21-Dec-2017 5:30 PM EST
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Aging, AIDS and HIV, Allergies, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Arthritis, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune Diseases, Biotech, Blood Disorders, Bone Health, Cancer, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Dermatology, Diabetes, Drug Resistance, Emergency Medicine, Environmental Health, Food and Water Safety, Healthcare, Hearing, Heart Disease, Immunology, Kidney Disease, Local - Virginia

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Article ID: 687199

Fish Use Deafness Gene to Sense Water Motion

Case Western Reserve University

Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the human ear sense a range of sounds.

Released:
21-Dec-2017 12:05 PM EST
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