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  • Embargo expired:
    21-May-2018 12:15 PM EDT

Article ID: 694419

Mediterranean Diet May Blunt Air Pollution’s Ill Health Effects

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Eating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.

Released:
11-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694853

Biology Student Links Clean Air Act to Red Spruce Recovery in Appalachia

West Virginia University

After a 50-year period of declining growth of the tree species prior to the Clean Air Act, a new study found that declining air pollution alongside increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide and warmer spring temperatures have resulted in dramatic forest growth recovery.

Released:
21-May-2018 10:35 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694240

The ‘Indoor Generation’: New, Global Research Shows Vast Misconceptions Regarding How Much Time People Spend Indoors, Understanding Of Potential Health Impacts Of Indoor Air Pollutants, Especially For Children

The Velux Group

New research shows more than three-quarters of people (77 percent) are not aware that indoor air can be as much as five times more polluted than outside air. In addition, respondents significantly underestimate the amount of time they spend indoors.

Released:
8-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
23-May-2018 12:15 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
11-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-May-2018 12:15 PM EDT

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Article ID: 693910

Battling Noise Pollution is a National Challenge at Rutgers

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Eric Zwerling has led America’s last noise control center at Rutgers University–New Brunswick for 28 years, and fighting noise pollution remains an uphill battle.

Released:
10-May-2018 10:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694200

Scientists Can Measure Population Change Through Chemicals Found in Feces

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Fecal stanols – organic molecules – located in sediment can give archaeologists new information about population numbers and changes, according to new research by faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York

Released:
8-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694036

Traffic-Related Pollution Linked to Risk of Asthma in Children

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

New research led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution significantly increases the risk of pediatric asthma, especially in early childhood.

Released:
3-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693894

U.S. Gains in Air Quality Are Slowing Down

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

After decades of progress in cleaning up air quality, U.S. improvements for two key air pollutants have slowed significantly in recent years, new research concludes. The unexpected finding indicates that it may be more difficult than previously realized for the nation to achieve its goal of decreased ozone pollution, scientists said.

Released:
2-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693656

Hearing Screening for Public Safety Professionals – New Method for 'Fitness for Duty' Assessments

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Hearing is an important part of fitness-for-duty assessments of police officers and other public safety professionals – but standard hearing tests don't give a true picture of whether these professionals can hear and communicate in the specific "noise environments" where they must work. A new approach to hearing assessment in public safety officers − which has been adopted by five government agencies in the United States and Canada − is presented in an article in Ear and Hearing. The official journal of the American Auditory Society, Ear and Hearing is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 2:20 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    27-Apr-2018 6:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693534

NUS-Led Study: Beltway to Divert Diesel Trucks in Sao Paulo Improved Public Health

National University of Singapore

A study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the University of Sao Paulo revealed that a beltway constructed to divert heavy-duty diesel vehicles traffic in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo has reduced public health damage associated with exposure to diesel.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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