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Medicine

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Pollution, Asthma, Children, Corinne Keet

Exposure to Larger Air Particles Linked to Increased Risk of Asthma in Children

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Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter — a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber — are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.

Science

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Scientists Identify Mechanism of Impaired Dendritic Cell Function that Weakens Immune and Therapeutic Response to Cancer

Wistar scientists revealed the mechanism implicated in the defective function of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs), a specialized type of immune cells that expose the antigens on their surface to activate the T cells

Medicine

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immune checkpoint blockade therapy, immune checkpoint, genomic sequencing, Cancer Therapy, Rutgers University, New Jersey

Tumor Mutational Burden and Response to Immune Checkpoint Therapy

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Researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey examined an association between mutational burden and response to immune checkpoint therapy in several cancer types and found that a mutational burden threshold exists in eight cancers that predict response to an immune checkpoint blockade.

Medicine

Science

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National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences, Niehs, Allergens, pets, Pests, Nhanes

Allergens Widespread in Largest Study of U.S. Homes

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Allergens are widespread, but highly variable in U.S. homes, according to the nation’s largest indoor allergen study to date. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that over 90 percent of homes had three or more detectable allergens, and 73 percent of homes had at least one allergen at elevated levels. The findings were published November 30 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Medicine

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egg allergy, Acaai, Allergist, Flu Shot

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 19-Dec-2017 12:00 AM EST

Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Ben Youngblood, memory t cells, T Cells, Cd8 T Cells, St. Jude immunology, effector t cells, t cell differentiation, origin of t cells, Immunotherapies, CD8 immunotherapy

Memory T Cells Responsible for Long-Term Immunity Have Been Cross-Trained

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St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Emory University research offers insight into origins of the T cells that provide enduring immune protection; findings should aid vaccine development and cancer immunotherapies

Medicine

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taste compliance palatability , Taste, Bitter, Irritation, palatability, Compliance, Pharmacogenetics

Unique Sensory Responses to the Pediatric HIV Medication Kaletra

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Research from the Monell Center documented wide individual differences to the taste of the life-saving HIV medication Kaletra and identified genetic sources of the taste variation. The findings suggest that the growing field of pharmacogenetics should assess the sensory response to medicines to promote medication compliance and treatment success.

Medicine

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heart failure, heart assist device, cardiomyopathy, gene expression, risk prediction

Genomic Blood Test Predicts Survival Rates After Surgery for Advanced Heart Failure

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An experimental blood test developed at UCLA that uses gene activity data from immune cells was 93 percent accurate in predicting survival rates for people with advanced heart failure who had surgery to implant mechanical circulatory support devices.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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the Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Dubin Breast Center, Tisch Cancer Institute, Kara DioGuardi, Immunotherapy, Breast Cancer

Sixth Annual Benefit Raises More Than $3.4 Million for the Dubin Breast Center

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The Dubin Breast Center of The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Mount Sinai Health System held its sixth annual benefit on Monday, December 11, 2017, at the Ziegfeld Ballroom in Manhattan.

Medicine

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Type 1 Diabetes, Immunotherapy, Gene Editing, Regulatory T Cells

Immunotherapy, Gene Editing Advances Extend to Type 1 Diabetes

Advances in engineering T cells to treat cancer are paving the way for new immunotherapies targeted at autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. Now, researchers are also investigating therapies that reprogram T cells to “turn down” an immune response, which may hold promise for curing type 1 diabetes, as well as a number of diseases where overactive T cells attack a person’s healthy cells and organs.







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