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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696412

Can the Kids Wait? Today's Youngsters May Be Able to Delay Gratification Longer Than Those of the 1960s

American Psychological Association (APA)

WASHINGTON -- Some 50 years since the original “marshmallow test” in which most preschoolers gobbled up one treat immediately rather than wait several minutes to get two, today’s youngsters may be able to delay gratification significantly longer to get that extra reward. This was the key finding of a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 2:45 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696284

Justice Not Blind to Gender Bias

Arizona State University (ASU)

The new study shows gender bias skews the way people perceive an attorney’s effectiveness when expressing anger.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 696540

Men Tolerate Stress Incontinence Years Before Seeking Help

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Men often tolerate stress urinary incontinence for more than two years before seeking medical help – and one-third put up with it for more than five years, making it important for doctors to check for this problem, a new study from UT Southwestern researchers advises.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
28-Jun-2018 5:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Jun-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 6:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 696358

Police Killings of Unarmed Black Americans Affect Mental Health of Black Community

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Black Americans are nearly three times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts, with even larger disparities among those who are unarmed. The trend is also harming the mental health of the black community, according to new research published in The Lancet from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Boston University School of Public Health.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 10:35 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696408

‘Exam Roulette’ Could Quell Essay-induced Anxiety

American Physiological Society (APS)

For many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student’s depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society’s (APS’s) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will discuss how a game of chance can lead to increased student preparation and motivation.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Education

Article ID: 696498

Writing Away the Body Image Blues

Northwestern University

In a new study, Renee Engeln, author of “Beauty Sick” (HarperCollins, 2017), tested the effect of three specific writing exercises on college women’s body satisfaction, along with co-author Natalie G. Stern also of Northwestern.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696261

Embargoed AJPH research: Prop. 47 and drug arrests, teen self-injury, LGBQ substance abuse, women’s tobacco use, public housing and asthma

American Public Health Association (APHA)

In this issue, find research on Prop. 47 and drug arrests, teen self-injury, LGBQ substance abuse, women’s tobacco use, public housing and asthma

Released:
18-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696489

Texas Tech Expert Available to Discuss Psychological Effects of Separation of Families

Texas Tech University

Released:
21-Jun-2018 3:35 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 696488

Ketamine Acts Fast to Treat Depression and Its Effects Last — but How?

University of Illinois at Chicago

In contrast to most antidepressant medications, which can take several weeks to reduce depressive symptoms, ketamine — a commonly used veterinary anesthetic — can lift a person out of a deep depression within minutes of its administration, and its effects can last several weeks. Researchers have long-wondered how ketamine can both act quickly and be so long-lasting.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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