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Discovery: Many White-Tailed Deer Have Malaria

By chance, scientists have discovered a malaria parasite that infects white-tailed deer. It’s the first-ever malaria parasite known to live in a deer species and the only native malaria parasite found in any mammal in North or South America.

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Rhino, Tiger and Snow Leopard DNA Found in Chinese Medicines

More should be done to stop the use of endangered species in traditional Chinese medicines, with snow leopard, tiger and rhinoceros DNA still being found in remedies, according to a leading University of Adelaide pathologist.

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Gray Treefrogs Provide Clues to Climate Change

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Females’ interpretation of mating calls may not be affected by climate change, could help provide clues to ecosystem management

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Study: Shark with Lowest-Known Metabolism Is a Sluggish Success

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Laziness can help you succeed… if you’re a nurse shark. A new research paper from Mote Marine Laboratory reveals that nurse sharks have the lowest metabolic rate measured in any shark — new evidence of the sluggish lifestyle that has helped the species survive for millennia.

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Larger (Relative) Brains = Higher IQ

Why do humans and dolphins evolve large brains relative to the size of their bodies while blue whales and hippos have brains that are relatively puny? While there has been much speculation regarding brain size and intelligence, a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences confirms that species with brains that are large relative to their body are more intelligent.

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Location, Location Location: Bat Survival Depends on It

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Bat body type, and the environmental conditions bats use in their hibernation sites, may explain species differences in bat mortality from white-nose syndrome, according to a Colorado State University-led study.

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Study: Some Climate Adaptations Do More Harm Than Good

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Worldwide responses to climate change could leave people worse off in the future according to a recent study conducted by CSIRO, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the University of Queensland.

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Mating Behaviour in the Natural World Contradicts Darwin’s Idea That Females Make the Decisions, Researchers Find

A provocative study by evolutionary biologists at McMaster University takes on one of Charles Darwin’s central ideas: that males adapt and compete for the attention of females because it is the females who ultimately choose their mates and the time of mating.

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Monarchs’ Wings Yield Clues to Their Birthplaces

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A newly published study of California’s overwintering monarch butterflies confirmed many previous migratory studies. But the findings also showed some unexpected and surprising patterns of movement, reports a research team led by the University of California, Davis.

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Welcome to the World: New Chameleon Emerges From Wilds of Tanzania

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WCS announced today that a team of scientists discovered a new species of chameleon in Tanzania.

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UF/IFAS Scientists Preserve the Endangered Ghost Orchid

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This rare orchid is unique for several reasons. First, it resembles a ghost when its white flower moves at night; hence, it is known as the Ghost Orchid. It is also leafless, and its roots attach to the bark of the host tree. About 2,000 ghost orchids remain in Florida, all the more reason to step up efforts to stabilize the current populations. Ghost orchids became more famous through a popular book, “Orchid Thief,” about a man arrested for stealing them from trees in a forest in Collier County, near the Everglades.

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Shark Hotspots ‘Tracked’ by Fishing Vessels

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A new study suggests that current ‘hotspots’ of shark activity are at risk of overfishing, and that the introduction of catch quotas might be necessary to protect oceanic sharks.

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Hunting Secrets of the Venus Flytrap (Hint: They Can Count)

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Carnivorous plants such as the Venus flytrap depend on meals of insects to survive in nutrient-poor soil. They sense the arrival of juicy insects, lured by the plants' fruity scent, with the aid of sensitive trigger hairs on the inner surfaces of their traps. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on January 21 have looked more closely at exactly how the plants decide when to keep their traps shut and begin producing their acidic, prey-decomposing cocktail of enzymes. The short answer is: they count.

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Invasive Amphibian Fungus Could Threaten US Salamander Populations

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USGS identifies research and management actions

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Researchers Find Microbial Heat Islands in the Desert

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Deserts are often thought of as barren places that are left exposed to the extremes of heat and cold and where not much is afoot. But that view is being altered as new research keeps revealing the intricate ecological dynamics of deserts as they change responding to the elements.

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Researchers at @UDelaware recently studied food fights between penguins to see why one species was dying off #penguinawarenessday

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Why Spiderman Can't Exist: Geckos Are 'Size Limit' for Sticking to Walls

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Latest research reveals why geckos are the largest animals able to scale smooth vertical walls - even larger climbers would require unmanageably large sticky footpads.

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Serendipitous Orchid: An Unexpected Species Discovered in Mexican Deciduous Forests

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A new elegant orchid species that grows on rocks in deciduous forests of the Pacific slope of Oaxaca state, Mexico, has finally put an end to a long standing dispute among taxonomists. 'Sheltered' under the name of a close relative, the plant has been proved by a research team, led by Dr. Leopardi-Verde, to be different enough for a species of its own. Its distinct features, including shape, size and colors, are discussed and published in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.

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New Research Helps Predict, Protect Species Diversity

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A new model developed by an international team including a University of Guelph researcher will help better understand and manage threatened ecosystems.

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Study: Deadly Amphibian Fungus May Decline

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A new study by WCS and other groups offers a glimmer of hope for some amphibian populations decimated by the deadly chytrid fungus.