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Stickleback Fish Adapt Their Vision in the Blink of an Eye

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Stickleback fish are able to adapt their vision to new environments in less than 10,000 years, a blink of the eye in evolutionary terms, according to new research by University of British Columbia biodiversity experts.

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Estimates of Cheetah Numbers Are 'Guesswork', Say Researchers

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Current estimates of the number of cheetahs in the wild are 'guesswork', say the authors of a new study which finds that the population in the cheetah stronghold of Maasai Mara, Kenya, is lower than previously thought.

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Indiana University Researchers Find Earth May Be Home to 1 Trillion Species

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Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to a study from biologists at Indiana University. The estimate, based on the intersection of large datasets and universal scaling laws, appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Hydropeaking of River Water Levels Is Disrupting Insect Survival, River Ecosystems

A group of researchers concluded today in a study in the journal BioScience that "hydropeaking" of water flows on many rivers in the West has a devastating impact on aquatic insect abundance.

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Expert: When It Comes to Spring Allergies, Oak Pollen More Potent Than Pine

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Birds of Prey Constrained in the Beak Evolution Race

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How birds' beaks evolved characteristic shapes to eat different food is a classic example of evolution by natural selection.

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Bearded Dragons Show REM and Slow Wave Sleep

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Brain sleep appeared early in vertebrate evolution.

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Expedition Scientists in Bolivia Discover Seven Animal Species New to Science in World’s Most Biodiverse Protected Area

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Scientists on an expedition through Madidi National Park—the world’s most biologically diverse protected area— have now discovered seven animal species new to science, finds that were made in 2015 and recently confirmed through careful comparisons with known species, according to the WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and local partners.

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Millions of Native Orchids Flourish at Former Mining Waste Site

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Millions of native orchids are flourishing on the site of a former iron mine in New York's Adirondacks, suggesting that former industrial sites – typically regarded as blighted landscapes — have untapped value in ecological restoration efforts.

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First Multi-Year Study of Honey Bee Parasites and Disease Reveals Troubling Trends

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Honey bee colonies in the United States are in decline, due in part to the ill effects of voracious mites, fungal gut parasites and a wide variety of debilitating viruses. Researchers from the University of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently completed the first comprehensive, multi-year study of honey bee parasites and disease as part of the National Honey Bee Disease Survey. The findings reveal some alarming patterns, but provide at least a few pieces of good news as well.

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Model Predicts How Forests Will Respond to Climate Change

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US Northeast's mixed forests unsustainable after 2050 while Cascade Mountains may require subtropical forest species.

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New Curiously Scaled Beetle Species From New Britain Named After 'Star Wars' Chewbacca

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Chewbacca, the fictional 'Star Wars' character, has given his name to a new species of flightless beetle, discovered in New Britain, Papua New Guinea. Although Trigonopterus chewbacca was only one of the four black new weevil beetles found during the expedition, it stood out with its curious scales, which made the authors think of Han Solo's loyal companion.

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Patterns of Glowing Sharks Get Clearer with Depth

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New study with 'shark-eye' camera reveals that biofluorescent catsharks increase light contrast underwater; might be used for communicating with each other.

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Foxes on One of California’s Channel Islands Have Least Genetic Variation of All Wild Animals

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UCLA biologists report in a new study that a species of foxes living on six of California’s Channel Islands have a surprising absence of genetic variation. The research, published today in the Cell Press journal Current Biology, provides a complete genome sequence for a small population of the endangered animals, which have been confined to the islands for thousands of years.

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New Research Solves Enigma in Ant Communication

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ASU scientists part of study that shows how 'winner-winner' behavior may shape animal colonies.

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Swarming Red Crabs Documented on Video

A research team studying biodiversity at the Hannibal Bank Seamount off the coast of Panama has captured unique video of thousands of red crabs swarming in low-oxygen waters just above the seafloor.

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Old-Growth Forests May Provide Buffer Against Rising Temperatures

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The soaring canopy and dense understory of an old-growth forest could provide a buffer for plants and animals in a warming world, according to a study from Oregon State University published today in Science Advances.

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Study of Chimpanzees Explores the Early Origins of Human Hand Dexterity

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Chimpanzees use manipulative dexterity to evaluate and select figs, a vital resource when preferred foods are scarce, according to a new Dartmouth-led study just published by Interface Focus.

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Mechanism Behind Plant Withering Clarified

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A research team led by Associate Professor Miyake Chikahiro and PhD student Takagi Daisuke from the Kobe University Graduate School of Agricultural Science have reproduced the reaction in which harmful reactive oxygen species are created during plant photosynthesis, and clarified a mechanism behind plant withering. This discovery could help to ensure stable food supplies by cultivating plants that can withstand environmental stresses such as global warming. The findings were published on March 2 in the online version of Plant Physiology.

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Temporal Cues Help Keep Human Looking Human

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Researchers believe that genetically modified bacteria can help explain how a developing animal keeps all of its parts and organs in the same general proportions as every other member of its species.