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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Sep-2016 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Science

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heavy drinking, Older Adults, neurocognition, Damage, Alcohol Dependence

Older adults with long-term alcohol dependence lose neurocognitive abilities

Heavy drinking can lead to neurophysiological and cognitive changes ranging from disrupted sleep to more serious neurotoxic effects. Aging can also contribute to cognitive decline. Several studies on the interaction of current heavy drinking and aging have had varied results. This study sought to elucidate the relations among age, heavy drinking, and neurocognitive function.

Medicine

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Endoscopic Brain Surgery, Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery , endoscopic endonasal resection of nonsecretory pituitary macroenoma , Live-stream surgery, Thomas Jefferson University and Hospital, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, James J. Evans, M.D., Marc Rosen, M.D.,

Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Surgeons James Evans and Marc Rosen Perform a Video-streamed Live Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery at Neurosurgery Meeting

Drs. Evans and Rosen perform an endoscopic endonasal resection of nonsecretory pituitary macroenoma surgery on Tuesday, September 27, 2:15–3:15 pm. The surgery is video-streamed live from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia to the San Diego Convention Center, where it will be seen by thousands of meeting attendees.

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Steve Wozniak, Billy Beane, Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, Daniel James Brown, Vice Admiral Mike Shoemaker

Steve Wozniak, Billy Beane, Daniel James Brown, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Akhil Amar, and VADM Mike Shoemaker Speaking at Neurosurgery Meeting

An exciting line-up of guest speakers will address thousands of leading neurosurgeons from across the globe at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting in San Diego, September 24-28, 2016

Medicine

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neuro health, Neurosurgeon, Neurosurgery, Neurosurgery education, neurosurgical education, neurosurgery meetings

2016 Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting Convenes September 24–28 in San Diego, California

The CNS holds its 2016 Annual Meeting in San Diego. The meeting theme Advance, Adapt, Achieve affirms neurosurgery’s ability to succeed by advancing innovative ideas through research, adapting treatments through knowledge, and ultimately, achieving breakthrough in patient care.

Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, CTE, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Tau Protein, Tau Proteins, Tau Tangles, tau, National Football League, Neuroimaging, Neuroimaging Studies, Positron Emission Tomography, ligand binding, Ligand, Concussion, concussion in sport, Depression, Memory

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Sep-2016 10:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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ALS, Motor Neurons, Biochemistry & Biophysics, Lou Gehrig's Disease

New ALS Discovery: Scientists Reverse Protein Clumping Involved in Neurodegenerative Conditions

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine announced the first evidence that stabilizing a protein called SOD1 can help reverse protein clumping in the types of neurons affected by the fatal neurodegenerative condition Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Medicine

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drug deliver, Tumor, Cancer, magnetic bacteria

Swarms of Magnetic Bacteria Could Be Used to Deliver Drugs to Tumors

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Researchers have recently shown that magnetic bacteria are a promising vehicle for more efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs.

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Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, University Of Haifa, Dr. Hadas Okon-Singer, Emotional Conflict

When We’re Unsure How to Respond, How Does Our Brain Decide whether a Situation is Pleasant or Not?

*Researchers from the Max Planck Institute in Germany and the University of Haifa used emotionally confusing video clips and revealed different neutral networks that operate when we perceive a situation as positive or negative*

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Drug May Prevent, Reduce Progression of MS in Mice

MINNEAPOLIS – The experimental drug laquinimod may prevent the development or reduce the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to research published in the September 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology® Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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Football Injuries, Concussion

Wake Forest Baptist Researchers Using NIH Grant to Study Cumulative Effects of Head Impacts in High School Football Players

Supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant worth a projected $3.3 million over five years, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center investigators have expanded their research into the cumulative effects of head impacts in young football players to the high school level.

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Immune and Targeted Therapies with Radiation Therapy Improves Outcomes for Melanoma Brain Metastases Patients, Say Moffitt Researchers

In their most recent Annals of Oncology publication, Moffitt researchers sought to determine if patients with melanoma brain metastases treated with immune and targeted therapies had improved outcomes over patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. They retrospectively analyzed data from 96 patients with melanoma brain metastases who were treated with stereotactic radiation therapy within 3 months of different targeted therapies (anti–PD-1 therapy, anti–CTLA-4 therapy, BRAF inhibitor plus a MEK inhibitor, or a BRAF inhibitor alone) or conventional chemotherapy.

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Presidential Debate: Expert Panel Gives Scientific Analysis of Candidates' Performances

Four expert panelists each day will present their analyses and answer your questions live and face-to-face. This event will be virtual. You can attend with any device -- PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device (with a webcam) – anywhere with good bandwidth. To participate (ask questions) in the meeting, you must be on video, just as a normal news conference. Register below for guaranteed seating; there is limited seating in the virtual room. Eight experts (four at each event) will present their analyses. The diverse expert team (7 universities and an institute) will analyze both candidates during the debates for their gestures, facial expressions (including smiles--number, type, appropriateness, etc.), posture, language, including sentiment, tone, inflammatory language, repetition, vocabulary, sentence structure, metaphors, framing, themes, suggestions, subtlety, nuance, honesty (deceit/lies—explicit and implicit), transparency, gender issues, and more...

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Autism, Virtual Reality, Brain, social cognition, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Children And Adolescents, Pediatric, Intervention, emotion recognition, Center for BrainHealth, Aspbergers

Study: Virtual Reality Training Improves Social Skills of Individuals on the Autism Spectrum

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that children with autism spectrum disorder, who participated in a virtual reality training program, improved social cognition skills and reported better real-world relationships. Neurocognitive testing showed significant gains in emotional recognition, understanding the perspective of others and the ability to problem solve.

Science

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Whitehead Institute, Rudolf Jaenisch, Methylation, Inherited, Imprinted, Dynamic, Aging Brain, Neural Cells

Inherited Parental Methylation Shifts Over Time, May Have Functional Effects in the Brain and Other Tissues

Inherited methylation—a form of epigenetic regulation passed down from parents to offspring—is far more dynamic than previously thought and may contribute to changes in the brain and other tissues over time. This finding by Whitehead Institute scientists challenges current understandings of gene regulation via methylation, from development through adulthood.

Medicine

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Alzheimer, alzheimer disease, Neurology, Brain, Gene

Genetic ‘Switch’ Identified as Potential Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

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A team at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre (CSC), based at Imperial College London, has found an important part of the machinery that switches on a gene known to protect against Alzheimer’s Disease.

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Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Genetics, Mental Health, support networks, Loneliness, Loneliness and Health

Do These Genes Make Me Lonely? Study Finds Loneliness Is a Heritable Trait

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Loneliness is linked to poor physical and mental health, and is an even more accurate predictor of early death than obesity. To better understand who is at risk, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine conducted the first genome-wide association study for loneliness — as a life-long trait, not a temporary state. They discovered that risk for feeling lonely is partially due to genetics, but environment plays a bigger role.

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Scientists Outline How Brain Separates Relevant & Irrelevant Information

New York University researchers offer a new theory, based on a computational model, on how the brain separates relevant from irrelevant information in these and other circumstances.

Science

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Amyloid Beta, Alzheimers disease

The Shape-Shifting Protein Behind Alzheimer’s Disease

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New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that the protein behind Alzheimer’s disease shape-shifts, changing its internal structure in order to infiltrate brain cells and become toxic.

Medicine

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pediatric neurology, Childhood Epilepsy, severe epileptic encephalopathy, Genetics, Precision Medicine, Pediatrics

Gene Discovery in Severe Epilepsy May Offer Clues to Unique Personalized Therapies

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An international team of researchers who discovered a new gene disorder that causes severe childhood epilepsy leveraged that finding to reduce seizures in two children. The collaborators’ case report reflects the potential of precision medicine--applying basic science knowledge to individualize treatment to a patient’s unique genetic profile







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