Feature Channels:

Genetics

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Alzheimber's Disease, Dementia

Gene Discovered Associated with Tau Pathology

Investigators at Rush University Medical Center and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries.

Medicine

Channels:

obesity syndromes

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Mar-2017 9:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Als), ALS, Genetics, Jumping Genes, Neurodegeneration

Research Suggests a Possible Role for a Storm of “Jumping Genes” in ALS

Dubnau-Joshua1Webjpg.jpg

By inserting an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked human gene called TDP-43 into fruit flies, researchers at Stony Brook University and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory discovered a potential role for ‘transposons’ in the disease.

Science

Channels:

Biology, Evolution, Genetics

Genetics Society of America Honors Richard Lewontin with 2017 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal

Lewontinphoto.jpg

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is pleased to announce that Richard C. Lewontin, PhD is the 2017 recipient of the Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal for lifetime achievement in the field of genetics. This award recognizes Lewontin’s extensive impact on our understanding of evolution, a broad and deep influence that has shaped the field. An unprecedented 160 distinguished biologists co-signed a letter of support to nominate Lewontin for the Morgan Medal. Lewontin is the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Emeritus and a Professor of Biology Emeritus in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.

Medicine

Channels:

Drug Trial for Solid Cancer Tumors, Lynch Syndrome Awareness, Side Effects for Prostate Cancer Treatments, and More in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Science

Channels:

Converting CO2 to Methanol, Cryo-Electron Microscopy, Space Dust in 3-D, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Medicine

Channels:

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering, Breast Cancer, Epigenetic, Epigenetics, José Baselga, Pik3 Ca, PI3K, PI3K inhibitors , ER+, ER+ breast cancer, Science, Research

Researchers Identify First Evidence of Epigenetic Role in Breast Cancer

Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have identified, for the first time, an epigenetic mechanism promoting breast cancer. The team found that inhibition of the PI3K pathway leads to activation of ER-dependent transcription through the epigenetic regulator KMT2D. These findings provide a rationale for epigenetic therapy in patients with PIK3CA-mutant, ER-positive breast cancer. While epigenetic factors have been known to play an important role in various cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, this is the first evidence found in breast cancer.

Medicine

Channels:

Kimmel Cancer Center, Cristian Tomasetti, Bert Vogelstein, Cancer, DNA, mutatuons

New Study Finds That Most Cancer Mutations are Due to Random DNA Copying ‘Mistakes’

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying “mistakes” account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.

Science

Channels:

Biology, Regenerative Medicine, regenerative biology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Mar-2017 6:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

Suburban Hospital, Wade Chien, Gene Therapy, Hearing Loss, DEAF, Deafness, Dizziness

Novel Gene Therapy Experiment Offers Hope for People with Certain Hearing Loss and Dizziness Disorder

whirlin_image_press_release.jpg

In a first-of-its-kind study published in the March 1, 2017 edition of Molecular Therapy, researchers from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine showed that gene therapy was able to restore balance and hearing in genetically modified mice that mimic Usher Syndrome, a genetic condition in humans characterized by partial or total hearing loss, dizziness, and vision loss that worsens over time. The hearing loss and dizziness is caused by abnormalities of the inner ear.







Chat now!