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Zerenex™ (Ferric Citrate) Long-Term Phase 3 Study Results Published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the publication of results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 study of Zerenex (ferric citrate), the Company's investigational oral ferric iron-based phosphate binder, for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis. The PERFECTED study (PhosphatE binding and iRon delivery with FErric CiTrate in EsrD) was published online today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).

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Ferric Citrate May Reduce Dialysis Patients’ Need for Multiple Medications

• Ferric citrate effectively reduced blood phosphorus levels while increasing iron stores and decreasing the need for intravenous iron and anemia medications in dialysis patients. • The medication may help reduce complications and costs associated with kidney disease care.

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Genetic Test Helps Predict Which Children with Kidney Disease Will Respond to Standard Therapy

• Among children with sporadic nephrotic syndrome, genetic mutations in the kidney’s filtration barrier were frequently linked with a lack of response to immunosuppressive treatments. • The genetic test was even more predictive than a kidney biopsy for identifying children who would not benefit from immunosuppressive therapies.

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Female Triathletes at Risk for Pelvic Floor Disorders and Other Complications

Female triathletes are at risk for pelvic floor disorders, decreased energy, menstrual irregularities and abnormal bone density, according to researchers at Loyola University Health System (LUHS). These data were presented today at the American Urogynecologic Society 2014 Scientific Meeting in Washington, DC.

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Scientists Discover Genetic Switch That Can Prevent Peripheral Vascular Disease in Mice

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Millions of people in the United States have a circulatory problem of the legs called peripheral vascular disease. It can be painful and may even require surgery in serious cases. This disease can lead to severe skeletal muscle wasting and, in turn, limb amputation.

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Tissue Collection Aids Search for Neurologic and Neuromuscular Disease Causes and Cures

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Like other major research centers studying genetic causes of uncommon and poorly understood nervous system disorders, Cedars-Sinai maintains a growing collection of DNA and tissue samples donated by patients. What sets Cedars-Sinai’s Repository of Neurologic and Neuromuscular Disorders apart is its special emphasis on tissue collection – part of its focus on creating future individualized treatments for patients.

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Inadequate Mental Health Care for Blacks with Depression and Diabetes, High Blood Pressure

A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment.

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Atomic Structure of Key Muscle Component Revealed in Penn Study

Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, biophysicists describe in minute detail actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.

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Media Advisory: GW to Host Conference on Preparing the Next Generation of Physical Therapists for Innovative Practice

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences Physical Therapy Program is pleased to host, in conjunction with Woods Duncan Consulting, “Preparing the Next Generation of Physical Therapists for Innovative Practice,” July 25-26.

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Continuous Antibiotics Not Necessary for Many Children with Common Prenatal Abnormality

Up to 5 percent of all prenatal ultrasounds uncover antenatal hydronephrosis, or enlarged kidneys, the most commonly detected prenatal abnormality in the U.S. Many children with this abnormality are treated continually with preventive antibiotics for the first few years of life with the hopes of preventing the condition’s associated urinary tract infections. Until recently, however, little evidence existed as to the benefits of this treatment, which involves considerable cost and inconvenience for families. But a new study found that, in most cases, continuous antibiotics for these children are unnecessary, findings that are especially of interest amidst increasing concern regarding antibiotic overuse.

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