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Scientists Improve Predictions of How Temperature Affects the Survival of Fish Embryos

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Scientists closely tracking the survival of endangered Sacramento River salmon faced a puzzle: the same high temperatures that salmon eggs survived in the laboratory appeared to kill many of the eggs in the river

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New Studies Take a Second Look at Coral Bleaching Culprit

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Scientists have called superoxide out as the main culprit behind coral bleaching: The idea is that as this toxin build up inside coral cells, the corals fight back by ejecting the tiny energy- and color-producing algae living inside them. In doing so, they lose their vibrancy, turn a sickly white, and are left weak, damaged, and vulnerable to disease.

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Greenland melting, Ice Sheet, Global Warming, Sediment Cores, Geology, Glacier erosion

East Greenland Ice Sheet Has Responded to Climate Change Over the Last 7.5 Million Years

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Using marine sediment cores containing isotopes of aluminum and beryllium, a group of international researchers has discovered that East Greenland experienced deep, ongoing glacial erosion over the past 7.5 million years. The research reconstructs ice sheet erosion dynamics in that region during the past 7.5 million years and has potential implications for how much the ice sheet will respond to future interglacial warming.

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Greenland, Ice Sheet, Climate Change, UVM, Greenland Ice Sheet, Sea Level Rise, sea level prediction, Geology, Nature, glacial ice, Ice Core, ocean sampling

Greenland on Thin Ice?

New research opens up the deep history of the Greenland Ice Sheet, looking back millions of years farther than previous techniques allowed—and raises urgent questions about if the giant ice sheet might dramatically accelerate its melt-off in the near future.

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Kansas State University, KSU, K-State, John Blair, Konza Prairie Biological Station, Ecology, soil carbon, Climate Change, Grassland ecosystems, Arctic ecosystems

Ecologists Publish Research on Soil's Potential to Increase the Earth's CO2

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Soil, an important part of the carbon cycle, might compound the world's carbon dioxide problem, according to a global study involving Kansas State University researchers and Konza Prairie Biological Station. The study, "Quantifying global soil carbon losses in response to warming," recently published in Nature, predicts that soils may release large quantities of carbon dioxide in response to warming, leading to even faster rates of warming globally.

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Climate Change, Nitrogen, Nitrous Oxide

Bacterial Mechanism Converts Nitrogen to Greenhouse Gas

Cornell Unviersity researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that helps convert nitrogen-based fertilizer into nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas.

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information theory, Permutation entropy, Climate Data

Predicting Unpredictability: Information Theory Offers New Way to Read Ice Cores

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A new technique based in information theory promises to improve researchers' ability to interpret ice core samples and our understanding of the earth's climate history.

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Climate Change, ocean studies, Clam shells , ocean conditions

Iowa State Scientist Uses Clam Shells to Help Build 1,000-Year Record of Ocean Climate

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Scientists -- including Iowa State's Alan Wanamaker -- have sorted and studied thousands of clam shells to build a 1,000-year record of ocean conditions and climate changes at a spot just off North Iceland.

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Bethlehem Star May Not Be a Star After All, The "Eye" of Majoranas, Cloud in a Box, and MORE in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

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Climate Science

Exploring the Fate of the Earth's Storehouse of Carbon

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A new study predicts that warming temperatures will contribute to the release into the atmosphere of carbon that has long been locked up securely in the coldest reaches of our planet.Soil and climate expert Katherine Todd-Brown of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is an author of the study, which was led by researchers at Yale.

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Climate, Climate Change, Weather, Storm Forecasts, Flood, Climate Policy

Climate Change Will Drive Stronger, Smaller Storms in U.S., New Modeling Approach Forecasts

The effects of climate change will likely cause smaller but stronger storms in the United States, according to a new framework for modeling storm behavior. Though storm intensity is expected to increase over today’s levels, the predicted reduction in storm size may alleviate some fears of widespread severe flooding in the future.

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Tornado, Thunderstorms, Weather, Climate Change, Outbreaks, Meteorological, Insurance, wind shear

Increasing Tornado Outbreaks—Is Climate Change Responsible?

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In a new study, Columbia Engineering researchers looked at increasing trends in the severity of tornado outbreaks where they measured severity by the number of tornadoes per outbreak. They found that these trends are increasing fastest for the most extreme outbreaks.

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Atmospheric Science, Weather, Thunderstorms, Climate Modeling, Great Plains, Midwest, Rain, Precipitation

Where the Rains Come From

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Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.

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Robert Korty, Robert Kor, Climate Change, Global Warming, Environment

6,000 Years Ago The Sahara Desert Was Tropical, So What Happened?

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As little as 6,000 years ago, the vast Sahara Desert was covered in grassland that received plenty of rainfall, but shifts in the world’s weather patterns abruptly transformed the vegetated region into some of the driest land on Earth.

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Droplet, Cloud, cloud chamber, Aerosol, Climate, drizzle drop

Cloud in a Box: Mixing Aerosols and Turbulence

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In research conducted in Michigan Tech’s cloud chamber, Physics Professors Raymond Shaw, Will Cantrell and colleagues found that cleaner clouds also have a much wider variability in droplet size. And the way those droplets form could have serious implications for weather and climate change.

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Climate Change, Flood Control, flood barriers, Sea Level Rising, Infrastructure, Hurricane, Nor'easter, Global Warming, Urban Planning, Concrete, Natural Disaster

Telescopic Walls Could Rise on Demand to Stop Flood Waters

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An University at Buffalo PhD student received a $225,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a system of telescoping concrete boxes to be used as “rise on demand” flood walls. The walls can be installed below ground level, so as not to block any water views, and can be raised when the threat of flooding occurs.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 8-Dec-2016 2:00 PM EST

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Ocean Science

How to Monitor Global Ocean Warming – Without Harming Whales

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Tracking the speed of internal tides offers a cheap, simple way to monitor temperature changes throughout the world’s oceans.

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Ted Schuur, Northern Arizona University, NAU, Permafrost, Climate Change

NAU Ecologist Shares Permafrost Prediction

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An article by NAU researcher Ted Schuur discusses how the release of carbon stored in the soil of the thawing Arctic tundra has the potential for speeding up climate change.

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Global Warming, ancient atmosphere, Nitrogen, Carbon, Bruce Watson, Morgan Schaller, Astrobiology

The Ancient Atmosphere and Carbon and Nitrogen in the Earth’s Crust

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Carbon and nitrogen are central to life on Earth – life cannot exist without them, but an overabundance in the atmosphere imperils the life we have. So how much carbon and nitrogen is there on planet Earth? And how much was in the ancient atmosphere? Actually, no one is really sure.







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