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For Soybean Growers, Hidden Cost of Climate Change Tops $11 Billion

Even during a good year, soybean farmers nationwide are, in essence, taking a loss. That's because changes in weather patterns have been eating into their profits and taking quite a bite: $11 billion over the past 20 years, according to a study by University of Wisconsin-Madison agronomists published last month in Nature Plants.

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Research Links Two Millennia of Cyclones, Floods, El Niño

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Research published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Rhawn Denniston, professor of geology at Cornell College, and his research team, created a 2,200-year-long record of extreme rainfall events that might also help predict future climate change.

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Geologists Identify New Source of Methane for Gas Hydrates in Arctic

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Researchers have identified a new source of methane for gas hydrates — ice-like substances that trap methane within the crystal structure of frozen water — in the Arctic Ocean. The findings point to a previously undiscovered, stable reservoir for methane that is “locked” away from the atmosphere, where it could impact global climate change.

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Upstate Medical University Study Discovers New Information on Climate Drivers of Dengue Fever

Researchers at Upstate Medical University, in collaboration with a team of international investigators studying dengue fever, have discovered new information on climate drivers of the disease and social risk factors that may be contributing to its spread.

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Wildfire Expert Available to Comment on Earth Hour, Carbon Emissions

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Antarctic Ice Shelves Rapidly Thinning

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A new study led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica’s floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change.

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No Baked Beans: Surprising Discovery of Elite Heat-Tolerant Beans Could Save “Meat of the Poor” from Global Warming

Amidst fears that global warming could zap a vital source of protein that has sustained humans for centuries, bean breeders with the CGIAR global agriculture research partnership announced today the discovery of 30 new types, or lines as plant breeders refer to them, of “heat-beater” beans that could keep production from crashing in large swaths of bean-dependent Latin America and Africa.

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Rise of Marine Diatoms Linked to Vast Increase in Continental Weathering

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A team of researchers, including Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professor Morgan Schaller, has used mathematical modeling to show that continental erosion over the last 40 million years has contributed to the success of diatoms, a group of tiny marine algae that plays a key role in the global carbon cycle. The research was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Computer Sims: In Climatic Tug of War, Carbon Released From Thawing Permafrost Wins Handily

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There will be a lot more carbon released from thawing permafrost than the amount taken in by more Arctic vegetation, according to new computer simulations conducted by Berkeley Lab scientists.

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Scientists Find Tropical Cyclone Size Controlled By Relative Sea-Surface Temperatures

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A team of scientists including Minghua Zhang, Dean and Director of Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), have found that the size of tropical cyclones is controlled by their underlying sea-surface temperatures (SST) relative to the conditions of the mean SST within the surrounding tropical zone of the storms. Their findings, published early online in Nature Communications, imply that under a warmer climate, the size of tropical cyclones (including hurricanes), are not based on the absolute value of SST alone.