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Synthetic Biology, Cellular Programming

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-May-2017 5:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistance, Bacteria, antibacterial resistance, Metals, organic acids, Food Pathogens, Food Preservation, Agricultural Chemicals And Pathogens, Israel, Innovation

A Possible Alternative to Antibiotics

Technion researchers say a combination of metals and organic acids is an effective way to eradicate cholera, salmonella, pseudomonas, and other pathogenic bacteria. The combination also works on bacteria that attack agricultural crops.

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Weathering of Rocks a Poor Regulator of Global Temperatures

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Observations from the age of the dinosaurs to today shows that chemical weathering of rocks changes less with global temperatures than believed. The results upend the accepted idea for how rocks regulate a planet's temperature over millions of years.

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cotton blight, Cotton, Bacteria, Xanthomonas citri, Plant Pathology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-May-2017 5:00 AM EDT

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Geoscience, Earth, lava, Archean, Geology, Hawaii, Galapagos

Researchers Discover Hottest Lavas That Erupted in Past 2.5 Billion Years From Earth’s Core-Mantle Boundary

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Researchers led by the Virginia Tech College of Science discovered that deep portions of Earth’s mantle might be as hot as it was more than 2.5 billion years ago.

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Smoke From Wildfires Can Have Lasting Climate Impact

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Researchers have found that carbon particles released into the air from burning trees and other organic matter are much more likely than previously thought to travel to the upper levels of the atmosphere, where they can interfere with rays from the sun – sometimes cooling the air and at other times warming it.

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University of Vienna, Lee Rozema, Quantum Information Science and Quantum Computation, Nature Communications, Quantum Mechanics, mathematical rules, photonic experiment , University of California Berkeley, quantum theories

Quantum Mechanics Is Complex Enough, for Now…

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Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team led by Philip Walther at the University of Vienna designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials, which were fabricated at the University of California Berkeley. Their experiment supports standard quantum mechanics and allows the scientists to place bounds on alternative quantum theories. The results, which are published in "Nature Communications", could help to guide theoretical work in a search for a more general version of quantum mechanics.

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Wolves Need Space to Roam to Control Expanding Coyote Populations

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Wolves and other top predators need large ranges to be able to control smaller predators whose populations have expanded, according to a study appearing May 23 in Nature Communications. The results were similar across three continents, showing that as top predators' ranges were cut back and fragmented, they were no longer able to control smaller predators.

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University of Washington, Atmospheric Science, Atmospheric Chemistry, Oxidants, Ozone, Ice Cores, Paleoclimate

Earth's Atmosphere More Chemically Reactive in Cold Climates

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Analysis of a Greenland ice core shows that during large climate swings, chemically reactive oxidants shift in a different direction than expected. The results mean rethinking what controls these molecules in our air.

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Leukemia, Cancer, Genetics, Medicine

Researchers Harness Metabolism to Reverse Aggressiveness in Leukemia

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Researchers have identified a new drug target for the two most common types of myeloid leukemia, including a way to turn back the most aggressive form of the disease.







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