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Medicine

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supar protein , Kidney Disease, Kidney Failure, Nephrology, Blacks, Genetic Mutation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Jun-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Thymine, DNA, Science, Biological Science, Lasers, Ultrafast, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source

A Single Electron’s Tiny Leap Sets Off ‘Molecular Sunscreen’ Response

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In experiments at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists were able to see the first step of a process that protects a DNA building block called thymine from sun damage: When it’s hit with ultraviolet light, a single electron jumps into a slightly higher orbit around the nucleus of a single oxygen atom.

Science

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Amino Acids, Plants, Botany, Chemistry

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Jun-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Science

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Microscope, Cancer, Optics, Mechanical Engineering, Pathology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Jun-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Science

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Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, polaron, solid state science, perovskite crystal structure, energy & environmental research, X Ray Scattering

How Protons Move Through a Fuel Cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

Medicine

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Research, Depression, O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute , Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute, Ut Southwestern

Study Answers Why Ketamine Helps Depression, Offers Target for Safer Therapy

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UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine’s rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.

Science

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heterochromatin, Genome, Cell Biology

Researchers Find New Mechanism for Genome Regulation

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The same mechanisms that separate mixtures of oil and water may also help the organization of an unusual part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new study by Berkeley Lab researchers. They found that liquid-liquid phase separation helps heterochromatin organize large parts of the genome into specific regions of the nucleus. The work addresses a long-standing question about how DNA functions are organized in space and time, including how genes are silenced or expressed.

Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Immunology, Antigens, T Cell, Immune, Paul Thomas, TCRdist, Immunotherapy

Researchers Create a ‘Rosetta Stone’ to Decode Immune Recognition

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St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed an algorithm that predicts T cell recognition of antigens and sets the stage to more effectively harness the immune system

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Parkinson’s Is Partly an Autoimmune Disease, Study Finds

Researchers have found the first direct evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson’s disease, suggesting that immunosuppressants might play a role in treatment.

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Advanced Camera For Surveys, Wide Field Camera 3, Galaxy Evolution, distant galaxies, Gravitational Lensing, dead disk galaxy, elliptical galaxies, spiral galaxies, CLASH galaxies multi-wavelength survey, MACS J2129-0741, MACS2129-1, Galaxy Cluster

Hubble Captures Massive Dead Disk Galaxy That Challenges Theories of Galaxy Evolution

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Astronomers combined the power of a “natural lens” in space with the capability of the Hubble Space Telescope to make a surprising discovery—the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang. Researchers say that finding such a galaxy so early in the history of the universe challenges the current understanding of how massive galaxies form and evolve.







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