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Medicine

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Social Environment, Health, mice

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jan-2017 2:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Cognitive Decline, SWAN, Women's Health, Menopause

Women’s Cognitive Decline Begins Earlier Than Previously Believed

Mental sharpness in women begins to decline as early as their 50s. Cognitive processing speed, which includes speed of perception and reaction, showed an average decline of around 1 percent every two years and verbal memory declined on average around 1 percent every five years.

Medicine

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Wayne State University, NIH, Tinnitus, Otolaryngology

Wayne State University Research Team Develops New Diagnostic Tool to Identify Tinnitus in Animals

A team of researchers from Wayne State University has developed a behavioral tool that may significantly aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tinnitus, ultimately leading to new drugs and treatment methods.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, African-American Patients , Prognosis, Chemotherapy, Survival Rates, Recurrence, Tumors, Mortality, Racial Disparity

Breast Cancer Prognosis of African-American Patients May Improve with Administration of Chemotherapy Before Surgery, Study Finds

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Administering chemotherapy to African-American breast cancer patients prior to surgery could improve their prognosis and survival rates from the disease, according to a new study.

Science

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The Tasmanian Tiger Had a Brain Structure Suited to a Predatory Life Style

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Brain scans suggest the action-planning part of the cortex was large in these extinct predators.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Synthetic Biology, risk, Modeling, Policy, Research, Risk Assessment, Regulation

New Tool Can Help Policymakers Prioritize Information Needs for Synthetic Biology Tech

New technologies are developed at a rapid pace, often reaching the market before policymakers can determine how they should be governed. Now researchers have developed a model that can be used to assess emerging synthetic biology products to determine what needs to be done to inform future policies.

Science

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Anthropology, acheology, Bering Strait, human settlements, Yukon, Radiocarbon, PLoS ONE, Montreal

The First Humans Arrived in North America a Lot Earlier Than Believed

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Anthropologists at Université de Montréal have dated the oldest human settlement in Canada back 10,000 years.

Science

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Environment, Biology, Environmental Science, Technology, Ecology, Geochemistry

Study of Microbes Reveals New Insight About Earth’s Geology and Carbon Cycles

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Tiny microbes play a big role in cycling carbon and other key elements through our air, water, soil and sediment. Researchers who study these processes at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that these microbial communities are significantly affected by the types of carbon “food” sources available. Their findings reveal that the type of carbon source affects not only the composition and activity of natural microbial communities, but also in turn the types of mineral products that form in their environment.

Medicine

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Classic Video Game System Used to Improve Understanding of the Brain

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Researchers use Donkey Kong to help guide new approaches in neuroscience.

Medicine

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Dengue, Genetically Modified Mosquito

Researchers Create Mosquito Resistant to Dengue Virus

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have genetically modified mosquitoes to resist infection from dengue virus, a virus that sickens an estimated 96 million people globally each year and kills more than 20,000, mostly children.

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Mapping Movements of Alien Bird Species

The global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers. It shows that human activities are the main determinants of how many alien bird species live in an area but that alien species are most successful in areas already rich with native bird species.

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Why Lyme Disease Is Common in the North, Rare in the South

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It's the heat and the humidity, USGS-led study finds

Science

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Water, water availability, Affordability

Affordable Water in the US: A Burgeoning Crisis

If water rates continue rising at projected amounts, the number of U.S. households unable to afford water could triple in five years, to nearly 36 percent, finds new research by a Michigan State University scholar.

Life

Education

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GRE, GRE Scores, Biomedical, Research, PREP, BBSP, Test Scores, Standardized Testing

Should Biomedical Graduate Schools Ignore the GRE?

A research team at the UNC School of Medicine found that the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), which is required for admission to graduate and doctorate programs across the country, is not the best indicator for predicting a student’s success while pursuing a doctorate in the experimental life sciences. And from that research, the team recommends devaluing – if not eliminating altogether – the GRE from the applications process for biomedical PhD candidates.

Science

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Fish physiology , Gene Expression, Fishes, Ocean Acidification, rockfish

Study Examines Ocean Acidification Effects on Rockfish, a Key CA Marine Prey Base

A new study led by researchers from Moss Landing Marine Labs of San Jose State University, California State University Monterey Bay and University of California Santa Cruz examines how ocean acidification may negatively affect some juvenile rockfish, a key marine prey base to the Calif. ecosystem.

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Songbirds Divorce, Flee, Fail to Reproduce Due to Suburban Sprawl

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New University of Washington research finds that for some songbirds, urban sprawl is kicking them out of their territory, forcing divorce and stunting their ability to find new mates and reproduce successfully, even after relocating.

Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Endometrial Cancer, Mount Sinai Health System, Precision Medicine, Cancer Screening, Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology , Oncogene, Cancer Prevention, Gynecologic Cancer

Endometrial Cancer Mutations Are Detectable in Uterine Lavage Fluid Before a Cancer Is Diagnosed

Mutations that have been linked to endometrial cancer can be found in the uterine lavage fluid of pre- and post-menopausal women both with and without detectable cancer, according to a study published in PLOS Medicine by John Martignetti, MD, PhD of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and colleagues.

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Genome Study Reveals Widespread “Gray Zone” of Animals Transitioning From One Species to Two

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New research publishing December 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology characterizes the ability of populations to interbreed and exchange genes as a function of the level divergence of their genomes.

Medicine

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Medicine And Health, Biology, Genetics

Study Shows Discrimination Interacts with Genetics and Impacts Health

It’s no secret that discrimination is stressful for those who experience it, but turns out the issue is more than skin deep—these stressors can interact with our genetics to negatively impact our health, a new University of Florida study shows.

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What Makes Influential Science? Telling a Good Story

Researchers from the University of Washington have found that scientific papers written in a more narrative style were more influential among peer-reviewed studies in the climate change literature. Their results were published Dec. 15 in the journal PLOS ONE.







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