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An Alternative to Opioids? Compound From Marine Snail Is Potent Pain Reliever

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A tiny snail may offer an alternative to opioids for pain relief. Scientists at the University of Utah have found a compound that blocks pain by targeting a pathway not associated with opioids. Research in rodents indicates that the benefits continue long after the compound have cleared the body.

Science

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, hydraulic fluids, Hydraulic Fracturing, hydraulic fracturing fluids, Fluids, Microbes, Microorganism, Microorganisms, Sustainability, Nature Microbiology, Microbiology, Emsl, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Environmental Science, Ecosystem, ecosystem health, JGI, Join

Hydraulic Fluids Hospitable for Microbes

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For the first time, scientists analyzed the genetic material of surface microbes that are colonizing the deep subsurface, where they are adapting and thriving.

Science

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Nature, Nature (magazine), Peptides, Proteins, Protein, protein analysis, Drug Design, drug, Drugs, hyperstable constrained peptides, Peptide, peptide drugs, Computational Methods, custom drugs, Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infect

Unlocking Peptide Potential

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Powerful new computational methods now enable scientists to design a virtually unlimited variety of hyperstable peptide structures not found in nature. This research opens a new frontier in drug discovery.

Life

Education

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Reseach, Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Surgery, Robot, Robotics, Robotic Assisted Surgery, Philadelphia, University City Science Center

Three University Technologies Receive $600,000 From Science Center’s QED Program

Researchers developing technologies to improve therapeutic success among radiotherapy patients, prevent chest wall collapses in pre-term infants with respiratory distress, and assist surgeons with pre-operative planning for femur fracture alignments will receive a total of $600,000 in funding through the ninth round of the University City Science Center’s QED Proof-of-Concept Program.

Medicine

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Microbiome, Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases, Biochemistry, Bacteriology, Animal Research, mice

From Mice, Clues to Microbiome’s Influence on Metabolic Disease

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The community of microorganisms that resides in the gut, known as the microbiome, has been shown to work in tandem with the genes of a host organism to regulate insulin secretion, a key variable in the onset of the metabolic disease diabetes. That is the primary finding of a study published this week by a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Gene Editing, Biotechnology, Ethical dilemmas, Ethical Guidelines, social acceptance, Cloning

How Do We Regulate Advanced Technologies Along Social or Ethical Lines?

The public’s wariness with new technologies, like CRISPR-9 and gene editing, is largely based on ethical, religious and social concerns, rather than concerns about safety or efficacy, which is what regulatory agencies are limited to consider.

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, Aaas Fellow, Biomedical Sciences, Medical Eduction, Scientists, infectious microorganisms, Immunology, Biomedical Research, Aaas Public Engagement Fellows

NYITCOM’s Martinez Named AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute Public Engagement Fellow

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Luis Martinez, Ph.D., is an infectious disease researcher selected as a Fellow in the second cohort of the AAAS Alan I. Leshner Leadership Institute for Public Engagement with Science.

Science

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Lemur, Lemurs, Facial Recognition, Biometrics, lemurID, Madagascar, Anil Jain, Michigan State University

Can Facial Recognition Systems Help Save Lemurs?

Michigan State University’s Anil Jain adapted his human facial recognition system to create LemurFaceID, the first computer facial recognition system for lemurs. Once optimized, LemurFaceID can assist with long-term research of the endangered species.

Science

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Biomedical Engineering, Food, Digestion, Food Additive, Small Intestine, Intestines, body, Health, Candy, gum, Titanium Dioxide, Nutrients, Cells, Meals, Eating, Metabolism, Diet, Nanoparticles, Digestive System, Toothpaste, milk, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton

Food Additive Found in Candy, Chewing Gum Could Alter Digestive Cell Structure and Function

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The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is “significantly decreased” after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything from chewing gum to bread, according to research from Binghamton University

Medicine

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CRISPR, Gene Editing, Biotech, Patent, Biochemistry, Genetics, University Of Utah, University Of California, Broad Institute

U. Biochemist Testified in CRISPR Gene Editing Patent Dispute

Science

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Tissue Engineering, Nervous System, Intestinal, Diabetes

Researchers Engineer Intestinal Tissue with Functioning Nervous System

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For the first time, NIH-funded researchers have used stem cells to grow intestinal tissues with a functioning nervous system. The advance creates new opportunities for studying intestinal diseases, nutritional health, and diabetes. It also brings researchers one step closer to growing patient-specific human intestines for transplant.

Science

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Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, Superbugs, cellular division, Biochemistry, Bacteriology, fluorescent d-amino acids, Medicine, Health, Biology, Chemistry

Indiana University Research: Rainbow Dyes Add Greater Precision in Fight Against 'Superbugs'

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A study reported Jan. 17 in the journal Science led by researchers at Indiana University and Harvard University is the first to reveal in extreme detail the operation of the biochemical clockwork that drives cellular division in bacteria. It is an important step forward in research on bacterial growth and could inform efforts to develop drugs that combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Science

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Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Zoology

Biochemical Tricks of the Hibernating Bear

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Winter is in full swing, and many of us have fantasized about curling up in a warm cave and slumbering until the warmth of spring arrives, just like a bear. Bears have the ability to sleep away the harsh winter months when food is scarce. They can spend five to seven months in hibernation. During this time, bears do not eat, drink, excrete or exercise. Despite the length of inactivity, bears do not experience bone loss, muscle loss, heart complications or blood clots like humans do during extended bouts of inactivity.

Medicine

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pain, CIPN, Vulvodynia, Interstitial Cystitis, Endometriosis

Measuring Pain: SLU Scientist Tests Possible Biomarkers

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Saint Louis University pharmacologist Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., will use a $363,000 grant from The Mayday Fund to advance her work to understand pain in order to develop new painkillers, partnering with physicians who treat four debilitating conditions.

Medicine

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Experimental Biology 2017, Faseb, Anatomy, Physiological, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Pathology, Nutrition, Pharmacology

Speakers Announced for 2017 Experimental Biology Meeting

World-renowned scientists will present pioneering research and discuss key issues affecting the life sciences at the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting (EB 2017), the premier annual meeting of six scientific societies in Chicago to be held April 22–26.

Science

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Aneurysm, Brain Surgery, Brain, High Performace Computing, Supercomptuer, Stroke, Blood, NIH

When Treating Brain Aneurysms, Two Isn’t Always Better Than One

Is it better to treat aneurysms with two overlapping flow diverters, or one compressed diverter? A computational study published in the American Journal of Neuroradiology points to the single, compressed diverter provided that it produces a mesh denser than the two overlapped diverters, and that it covers at least half of the aneurysm opening. The ongoing research could eventually help doctors determine the best way to treat patients suffering from aneurysms.

Science

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light flashes, oxidative metabolism, biomedical diagnostics, light detection, Oxidative Stress, early-stage diagnostics, Michael Poplova, Eduard P.A. Van Wijk, Michal Cifra

Flashes of Light Offer Potential for Biomedical Diagnostics

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A group of researchers from the Czech Republic were intrigued that living organisms emit small amounts of light resulting during oxidative metabolism, when oxygen is used to create energy by breaking down carbohydrates. The researchers began to think about how detecting this light could have potential for biomedical diagnostics. At the Biophysical Society’s meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017, Michal Cifra will present the group’s work within this realm.

Medicine

Channels:

Microbiology, Astrobiology, Metabolic Activity, Limit

Researchers Look for Life's Lower Limits

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Investigating the lower bound of energy required for life helps us understand ecological constraints on other planetary bodies in our solar system as well as our own. In a new study, researchers analyze cellular processes across species and sizes of bacteria, to zoom in on life's minimal energy requirements.

Science

Channels:

Cadherin, Cell Adhesion, super-resolution microscopy

Illuminating the Contacts

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Using super-resolution microscopy, an international research team led by Assistant Professor Pakorn (Tony) Kanchanawong from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at NUS, as well as Dr Cristina Bertocchi, Research Fellow at MBI, has revealed, for the first time, how cadherin-based cell-cell contacts are organised.

Science

Channels:

Enzymes, Extreme pressure, biochemical reactions, pressure effects, Microbes, Extremophile, Qi Huang, Jocelyn M. Rogers, Russell J. Hemley, Toshiko Ichiye, Georgetown University, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

Life Under Pressure

Life can thrive in some of the most extreme environments on the planet. Microbes flourish inside hot geothermal vents, beneath the frigid ice covering Antarctica and under immense pressures at the bottom of the ocean. For these organisms to survive and function, so must the enzymes that enable them to live and grow. Now, researchers from Georgetown University have homed in on what allows particular enzymes to function under extreme pressures. The team will present its work during the Biophysical Society meeting held Feb. 11-15, 2017.







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