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Medicine

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Gi Tract, Parkinson's Disease, Norovirus, Upper GI, Chronic Infection, Protein, Animal Studies

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Jun-2017 4:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Neuroblastoma, New Biomarker Assay , Improved disease assessment, Prediction of disease progression

New Biomarker Assay Detects Neuroblastoma with Greater Sensitivity

Investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles have developed and tested a new biomarker assay for quantifying disease and detecting the presence of neuroblastoma even when standard evaluations yield negative results for the disease.

Medicine

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Crohn's Diease, High Fat Diet, Gut Bacteria

High Fat Diet Reduces Gut Bacteria, Crohn’s Disease Symptoms

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have shown a high fat diet may lead to specific changes in gut bacteria that could fight harmful inflammation.

Medicine

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Breath, volatile organic compound, biomarkers, breast cancer diagnostics, Mammography, breast screening, Breast Imaging

A Simple Breath Test Could Be the Next Evolution in Breast Cancer Diagnostics

USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center is actively recruiting for a clinical trial that seeks to eliminate unnecessary testing for breast cancer with a simple breath test.

Medicine

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Crohn Disease, Fungus, gut microbiome

Single Fungus Amplifies Crohn’s Disease Symptoms

A microscopic fungus called Candida tropicalis triggered gut inflammation and exacerbated symptoms of Crohn’s disease, in a recent study conducted at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Science

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Geography Research, Forestry Research, Forestry, oak trees, oak forests, white oaks, environmental adaptation

Geography Faculty Members Earn NSF Grant to Study Oak Forests

Three geography faculty members have received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) award of $232,099 for a collaborative research project to assess the environmental and human drivers and the cultural dimension of changes in oak forests in the eastern United States.

Medicine

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AML, Leukemia, gilteritinib, FLT3

New Inhibitor Drug Shows Promise in Relapsed Leukemia

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A new drug shows promise in its ability to target one of the most common and sinister mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center. The Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene mutation is a known predictor of AML relapse and is associated with short survival. In a first-in-human study, researchers treated relapsed patients with gilteritinib, an FLT3 inhibitor, and found it was a well-tolerated drug that led to frequent and more-sustained-than-expected clinical responses, almost exclusively in patients with this mutation.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Social Media, Happiness, Popularity, friendship paradox, data science, Network Science, Subjective Well-Being, sentiment analysis, Natural Language Processing, Mental Health

Study Finds Most People Aren't as Happy as Their Friends on Social Media

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A study led by computer scientists at Indiana University has found that people with the most connections on social media are also happier. This may cause most social media users to not only regard themselves as less popular than their friends but also less happy.

Medicine

Science

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Malaria, India, Infectious Diseases, Developing world diseases

UW-Led Scientists 'Closing the Gap' on Malaria in India

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The National Institutes of Health has renewed a major grant that funds a University of Washington-led research center to understand malaria in India.

Medicine

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Dr. Crotty , La Jolla Institute , HIV, Hiv Vaccine, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

San Diego Team Tests Best Delivery Mode for Potential HIV Vaccine

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For decades, HIV has successfully evaded all efforts to create an effective vaccine but researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) are steadily inching closer. Their latest study, published in the current issue of Immunity, demonstrates that optimizing the mode and timing of vaccine delivery is crucial to inducing a protective immune response in a preclinical model.







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