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Medicine

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zika, Pregnancy, Miscarriage, Placenta

Zika May Cause Miscarriages, Thin Brain Tissue in Babies Carried to Term

Johns Hopkins researchers say that in early pregnancy in mice with complete immune systems, Zika virus can cross the placenta – intended to protect the developing fetus – and appears to lead to a high percentage of miscarriages and to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells.

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An Alternative to Opioids? Compound From Marine Snail Is Potent Pain Reliever

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A tiny snail may offer an alternative to opioids for pain relief. Scientists at the University of Utah have found a compound that blocks pain by targeting a pathway not associated with opioids. Research in rodents indicates that the benefits continue long after the compound have cleared the body.

Medicine

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Xinzhong Dong, itch , GRP neuron, Gastrin releasing peptide neuron, pain, Signal

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, hidden hearing loss, Audiology, Ear And Hearing, Noise Induced Hearing Loss, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelin diseases, Demyelination Diseases

Second Cause of Hidden Hearing Loss Identified

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Some people can pass a hearing test but have trouble understanding speech in a noisy environment. New research identifies a new mechanism for this condition just years after its discovery.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Stem Cell Therapy, Regeneration Of Hair Cells, Deafness

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Stem Cells Collected From Fat May Have Use in Anti-Aging Treatments

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Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat are more stable than other cells – such as fibroblasts from the skin – and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. They made the discovery after developing a new model to study chronological aging of these cells.

Medicine

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Ulcerative Colitis, Inflamamatory Bowel Disease (Ibd), Crohn's Diease, Digestive Diseases, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Levels, Colonoscopy, Relapses, Remission, Cathelicidin, Protein, Microbiome, flare-up, clinical remission, Colon, colon disease, Gastroenterology And Hepatology

Lower Serum Vitamin D During Remission Increases Risk of Clinical Relapse in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

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A new study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that lower levels of vitamin D in the blood increase the risk of clinical relapse in patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC), an inflammatory bowel disease that causes long-lasting inflammation and ulcers in the colon. The study was published in the February issue of the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Medicine

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DMC, children's hospital of Michigan, Pediatric Kidney Stones, pediatric nephrology, Dr. Larisa Kovacevic, Nephrolithiasis, Children, Proteomics, Hypercalciuria, Urinary apolipoproteins, Pediatric Kidney Stone Clinic, Detroit, Michigan

Detroit Urology Research Team Suggests Link Between Lipoproteins and Kidney Stones in Children

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A unique study recently published in the authoritative Pediatric Nephrology medical journal shows that excess lipoproteins and fatty acids may be associated with the development of painful and often chronic kidney stones in children.

Science

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Tissue Engineering, Nervous System, Intestinal, Diabetes

Researchers Engineer Intestinal Tissue with Functioning Nervous System

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For the first time, NIH-funded researchers have used stem cells to grow intestinal tissues with a functioning nervous system. The advance creates new opportunities for studying intestinal diseases, nutritional health, and diabetes. It also brings researchers one step closer to growing patient-specific human intestines for transplant.

Science

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Big Data, analytic tools, Software architecture, Software, Metric, Computer Science

Is Your Big Data Messy? We’re Making an App for That

Vizier, software under development by a University at Buffalo-led research team, aims to proactively catch big data errors. The project, backed by a $2.7 million National Science Foundation grant, launched in January. Like Excel, Vizier will allow users to explore, clean, curate and visualize data in meaningful ways, as well as spot errors and offer solutions. But unlike spreadsheet software, Vizier is intended for much larger datasets; i.e., millions or billions of data points.

Medicine

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Cancer, Breast Cancer, Tumor Microenvironment, Metastatic Breast Cancer, Tyrosine Kinase, DDR2

Looking Beyond Cancer Cells to Understand What Makes Breast Cancer Spread

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A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center identifies a protein in that microenvironment that promotes the spread of breast cancer cells. It’s part of a well-known family of receptors for which promising inhibitors are being developed.

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New Test May Quickly Identify Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Underlying Brain Damage

A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion.

Science

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Hydrogen, Hydrogen Reforming, Methane, four-stroke engine, reforming reactor

Four-Stroke Engine Cycle Produces Hydrogen from Methane and Captures CO2

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When is an internal combustion engine not an internal combustion engine? When it’s been transformed into a modular reforming reactor that could make hydrogen available to power fuel cells wherever there’s a natural gas supply available.

Medicine

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NIH, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Neonatal Research Network , Preterm Births, Preterm Delivery, neurodevelopmental outcomes, Neurodevelopment Disabilities, Neonatology, NICU, Intensive Care Patients, Preemies, Preemie Care, Premature Births, Premature Birth

More Extremely Preterm Babies Survive, Live Without Neurological Impairment

Babies born at just 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy continue to have sobering outlooks -- only about 1 in 3 survive. But according to a new study led by Duke Health and appearing Feb. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine, those rates are showing small but measurable improvement. Compared to extremely preterm babies born a decade earlier, the study found a larger percentage are developing into toddlers without signs of moderate or severe cognitive and motor delay.

Medicine

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Retinopathy Of Prematurity, Blindness, Preeclampsia, Premature Birth

Is Preeclampsia a Risk or a Protective Factor in Retinopathy of Prematurity?

Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, MD, and colleagues at the John A. Moran Center and Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, were looking for a way to tease apart the effects of preeclampsia on the risk of developing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), an eye disease found in premature infants. Their results, and the model they developed, were published February 14, 2017, in Scientific Reports.

Science

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Cancer, Cell Division, cell

Scientists Discover How the Cells in Skin and Organ Linings Maintain Constant Cell Numbers

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Research published today in Nature from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah shows how epithelial cells naturally turn over, maintaining constant numbers between cell division and cell death.

Medicine

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Scripps Florida Scientists Take Aim at Obesity-Linked Protein

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In a study recently published online in the journal Molecular Metabolism, Chakraborty and his colleagues have shown that deleting the gene for this protein, known as IP6K1, protects animal models from both obesity and diabetes.

Medicine

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Aging, Resilience, Autophagy, Huntington's, Neurodegeneration, protein aggregation, Hormesis, Longevity, Lifespan, Heat Stress, C. Elegans

What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Stronger

Biologists have known for decades that enduring a short period of mild stress makes simple organisms and human cells better able to survive additional stress later in life. Now, scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have found that a cellular process called autophagy is critically involved in providing the benefits of temporary stress. The study, published today in Nature Communications, creates new avenues to pursue treatments for neurological disorders such as Huntington’s disease.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Pediatric HIV, Mother To Child Transmission, HIV-1

Only a Limited HIV Subset Moves From Mother to Child, Study Shows

FINDINGS In the transmission of HIV-1 from mother to child only a subset of a mother’s viruses infects their infants either in utero or via breastfeeding, and the viruses that are transmitted depend on whether transmission occurs during pregnancy or through breastfeeding, according to UCLA-led research. BACKGROUND Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type1 poses a serious health threat in developing countries, and more effective interventions are needed.

Medicine

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Emergency Department, ophtahlmology, Eye Care, pinkeye, Vision, Emergency Care, Optometry

1 in 4 ER Visits for Eye Problems Aren’t Actually Emergencies, Study Finds

Pinkeye isn’t a medical emergency. Neither is a puffy eyelid. But a new study finds that nearly one in four people who seek emergency care for eye problems have those mild conditions, and recommends ways to help those patients get the right level of care.







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