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Medicine

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Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Pediatrics, Neurology, Metabolism, Cell Biology, Clinical Trials, Suranim

Researchers Studying Century-Old Drug in Potential New Approach to Autism

In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, was safely administered to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who subsequently displayed measurable, but transient, improvement in core symptoms of autism.

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"Safe" Drug Consumption, Youth with HIV, Promising Vaccine Research, and More in the AIDS and HIV News Source

The latest research, features, and experts on HIV and AIDS.

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Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Obesity, george washington university school of medicine and health sciences, Physiology, Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight, JCI Insight, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

Cellular Stress in the Brain May Contribute to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight shows that cellular stress in the brain may contribute to development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Medicine

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Brain Network, Executive Function, teen brains, Adolescence, Youth

Penn Medicine Researchers Identify Brain Network Organization Changes That Influence Improvements in Executive Function Among Adolescents and Young Adults

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In a new study, published this week in Current Biology, a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers report newly mapped changes in the network organization of the brain that underlie those improvements in executive function. The findings could provide clues about risks for certain mental illnesses.

Medicine

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ADHD, Chacko, NYU, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, NYU Steinhardt, Parenting, Parent Training

Parent Training on ADHD Using Volunteers Can Help Meet Growing Treatment Needs

Using volunteers to train parents concerned about attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in their children can improve capacity to meet increasing ADHD treatment needs, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

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Researchers Find Brain Differences Between People with Genetic Risk for Schizophrenia, Autism

Deletions or duplications of DNA along 22nd chromosome create anatomical features, detected by MRI scans, and hint at biological underpinnings of these disorders

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Three Types of Work Stress Increasing in the U.S., According to SUNY Downstate Researchers

Two stressful work characteristics, low job control and “job strain” – that is, high-demand, low-control work – have been increasing in the U.S. since 2002. The findings may explain why declines in cardiovascular disease and related mortality have slowed. Researchers also found an increase in "work-family conflict."

Science

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Experimental Biology 2017, APS Leadership, APS Councilors, APS Council, APS President, APS President Elect, APS Officers, Membership

New Officers Begin Terms at American Physiological Society

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The American Physiological Society (APS) is pleased to announce its new leadership: President Elect Jeff M. Sands, MD, and Councilors Charles H. Lang, PhD; Merry L. Lindsey, PhD; and Ronald M. Lynch, PhD. The new officers were elected by the APS membership and took office last month at the Experimental Biology meeting in Chicago.

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Can Parents’ Tech Obsessions Contribute to A Child’s Bad Behavior?

Study looks at whether behaviors like whining and tantrums could be related to parents spending too much time on their phones or tablets.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Traumatic Events, Resilence, post-traumatic stress disorder , Children And Adolescents

Emotional Toll From Mass Trauma Can Disrupt Children’s Sense of Competence

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Traumatic events, such as a terrorist attack or natural disaster, can effect children's perceptions of competence. According to a new Iowa State study, children with higher levels of competence were more resilient and had fewer PTSD symptoms following a traumatic event.







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