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Medicine

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Public Health, public health and medicine , 1917 clinic, HIV, AIDS, Stigma, Stigma and Health

Addressing Stigma, Coping Behaviors and Mechanisms in Persons Living with HIV Could Lead to Better Health Outcomes

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UAB researchers develop a conceptual framework to help progress the care of people living with HIV by looking at ways to pursue better engagement in care.

Medicine

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San Quentin, Nigel Poor, Sacramento State, Jefferson Award, San Quentin Prison Report Radio Project, Radiotopia

Professor Wins Jefferson Award for San Quentin Project

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Nigel Poor is producing a podcast about life in prison.

Medicine

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VR in the OR, Healthy Volunteers, Preventing HIV among Youth, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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HIV, Latino Men

New Behavioral Intervention Targets Latino Men at High Risk of HIV Infection

Men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for two thirds of all new HIV infections in the United States, with 26 percent occurring in Latinos, according to 2014 data. If those rates continue, it is estimated that one in four Latino MSM may be diagnosed with HIV during his lifetime.

Medicine

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UCLA, UCLA health, Transgender, Youth, HIV, AIDS, Center For Disease Control, Women & AIDS, Infectious Disease

Preventing HIV Among Youth, Transgender People

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According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 22 percent of new HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2014 occurred among young people ages 13 to 24, 80 percent of whom were gay and bisexual males.

Medicine

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GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, HIVAIDS, BELIEVE grant, NIH, HIV cure research, HIV Reservoirs, AIDS, HIV

Defective HIV Proviruses Reduce Effective Immune System Response, Interfere with HIV Cure

A new study finds defective HIV proviruses, long thought to be harmless, produce viral proteins and distract the immune system from killing intact proviruses needed to reduce the HIV reservoir and cure HIV. The study was published by researchers at the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University in Cell Host & Microbe.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Ya Chi Ho, Immune, proviruses

New Evidence: Defective HIV Proviruses Hinder Immune System Response and Cure

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities report new evidence that proteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specific type of immune cell, called cytotoxic T cells.

Medicine

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Zambia, Africa, Neurology, Rush University Medical Center, Rush University, neuroinfectious disease, HIV, Global Health, Medical residencies, Neuroimmunology, Igor Koralnik

Neurology Residents from Rush Will Bring Care to Zambia, Sharpened Clinical Skills Back to America

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Starting in the 2017-18 school year, two Rush neurology residents will complete a one-month rotation in Zambia, Africa, each year as part of a new elective rotation run by Dr. Igor Koralnik, chairperson of the Department of Neurological Sciences at Rush Medical College and chief of the Section of Neuroinfectious Diseases.

Medicine

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ATV-Related Injuries, New HIV Reservoir, Drug Injection Risk, Ebola Epidemic, and More in the Public Health News Source

The latest research, experts and features in Public Health in the Public Health News Source

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS

UNC Researchers Identify a New HIV Reservoir

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A UNC research team has identified a new cell in the body where HIV persists despite treatment. This discovery has major implications for cure research.







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