Curated News:

Staff Picks

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Smart Grid, Blackout, power grid security, cyberattacks, Vanderbilt University School of Engineering, Vanderbilt, North Carolina State University, Washington State University

Making America’s Power Grid Much, Much Smarter

AbhishekDubey.jpg

A new, open-source software platform has been designed to support applications required to create a smart power grid and protect it from dangers ranging from terrorists to falling tree limbs.

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Products Can Be Pals When You’re Lonely, but It May Cost You, Study Finds

ProductsPals_Diepenbrock_032917.png

According to a new study, it appears humanlike products do keep people from seeking out normal human interaction, which is typically how people try to recover from loneliness. However, there are limits to this phenomenon, and the long-term consequences are unclear, the researchers said.

Medicine

Channels:

Paralysis, quadriplegia, Case Western Reserve University, Biotechnology, Cleveland FES Center, Biomedical Engineering

Man with Quadriplegia Employs Injury Bridging Technologies to Move Again—Just by Thinking

Bill1.jpg

Bill Kochevar, who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident, is believed to be the first person with quadriplegia in the world to have arm and hand movements restored with the help of two temporarily implanted technologies.

Medicine

Channels:

Seth Margolis, Alzheimer’s, ephexin5 , Brain, Amyloid

Protein That Regulates Brain Cell Connections Could Be New Target for Treating Alzheimer's Disease

neuronssynapselighted_iStock-92039119.jpg

In experiments with a protein called Ephexin5 that appears to be elevated in the brain cells of Alzheimer's disease patients and mouse models of the disease, Johns Hopkins researchers say removing it prevents animals from developing Alzheimer's characteristic memory losses. In a report on the studies, published online March 27 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, the researchers say the findings could eventually advance development of drugs that target Ephexin5 to prevent or treat symptoms of the disorder.

Science

Channels:

Why Are Primates Big-Brained? Researchers’ Answer Is Food for Thought

HighamChimp2017.jpg

Brain size in primates is predicted by diet, an analysis by a team of New York University anthropologists indicates. These results call into question “the social brain hypothesis,” which has posited that humans and other primates are big-brained due to factors pertaining to sociality.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Politics, Psychology, Personality, Social Psychology, University At Buffalo

Is Personal Adversity Contributing to Political Polarization?

Michael-Poulin.jpg

Unexpected life events can lead to political polarization, pushing moderates toward the spectrum’s extremes, according to study co-authored by UB psychologist.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Environment, Climate Change

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Mar-2017 3:00 PM EDT

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Bullying, bullying solutions, workplace bullying, organizational communication, work culture, Harrassment

Does Advice for Managing Workplace Bullying Really Work?

In a new study featured in the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research, authors Stacy Tye-Williams and Kathleen J. Krone identify and re-imagine the paradox of workplace bullying advice. They interviewed 48 individuals from a variety of occupations and found that targets of workplace bullying frequently offered advice they had received to other targets, despite believing that the advice either made no difference or had made their own situations worse.

Science

Channels:

Seal Beach, California, Wetlands, Earthquakes, paleoseismology, U.S. Geological Survey

Sinking of Seal Beach Wetlands Tied to Ancient Quakes

seal_Beach.jpeg

When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.

Medicine

Channels:

Infectious Diseases, zika virus, Pregnancy, Obstetrics, Autism, Neurology, Virology

How Prenatal Maternal Infections May Affect Genetic Factors in Autism Spectrum Disorder

zika_virus_protein_data_bank.jpg

In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, University of Cyprus and Stanford University map the complex biological cascade caused by MIA: the expression of multiple genes involved in autism are turned up or down by MIA, affecting key aspects of prenatal brain development that may increase risk for atypical development later in life.







Chat now!