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Evolution and Darwin

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Science

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Funneling Fundamental Particles, Neutrino Experiments, Physicists Discover 'Apparent Departure From the Laws of Thermodynamics', and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

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Science

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Earth Science, marine and freshwater biology, Oceanography

Darwin's Theory About 'Impassable' Marine Barrier Holds True for Coral Larvae in the Pacific

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MIAMI--An international team of scientists used a state-of-the-art computer model, a high-powered supercomputer, and five billion 'virtual' coral larvae to test Charles Darwin's 1880 hypothesis that marine species cannot cross the Eastern Pacific's "impassable" marine barrier. The team, which included University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Associate Professor Claire Paris, found that Darwin's theory still hold true today even under extreme El Niño conditions known to speed up ocean currents.

Science

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Ornithology, Warbler, Genetics

Genetically Speaking, Blue-Winged and Golden-Winged Warblers Are Almost Identical

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New research from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Fuller Evolutionary Biology Program shows that, genetically speaking, blue-winged and golden-winged warblers are almost identical. Scientists behind the research say the main differences between the two species are in feather color and pattern, in some cases just a simple matter of dominant or recessive pairings of gene variants, or alleles.

Science

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Evolution, genes, evolutionary development, cylcopism, Beetles, etymology, evodevo, Genetics, Development, Insects

'Cyclops' Beetles Hint at Solution to 'Chicken-and-Egg' Problem in Novel Trait Evolution

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Beetles with cyclops eyes have given Indiana University scientists insight into how new traits may evolve through the recruitment of existing genes -- even if these genes are already carrying out critical functions.

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New Techniques Boost Understanding of How Fish Fins Became Fingers

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The cells that make fin rays in fish play a central role in forming the fingers and toes of four-legged creatures, one of the great transformations required for the descendants of fish to become creatures that walk on land.

Science

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Plasticity, Fossil Record, Anthropolgy, Jaw research, Evolution diversity

Reinterpreting the Fossil Record on Jaws

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Scientists use the fossil record to make judgments on the physiology and behavior of species. But are those interpretations correct? New research from the University of Notre Dame puts into question how we interpret the behavior of extinct organisms from their fossil remains, and the greater role of plasticity in determining evolution diversity.

Science

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mammal populations, Living Fossil, Taxonomy, Evolution, Evolution Biology, popular science

On the Prowl for an Elusive Rodent Called ‘the Ultimate Pokémon’

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Researchers are on a real-life search for what one calls “the ultimate Pokémon”: Zenkerella, an elusive scaly-tailed squirrel that has never been spotted alive by scientists. However, biologists recently found three newly dead specimens that hint at how the “living fossil” has evolved over the past 49 million years.

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RNA, Ribozyme, DNA, Protein, Trasncription, RNA replication, RNA tran, polymerase ribozyme

TSRI Scientists Take Big Step Toward Recreating Primordial ‘RNA World’ of 4 Billion Years Ago

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have created a ribozyme that can basically serve both to amplify genetic information and generate functional molecules, a big step toward the laboratory re-creation of the “RNA world,” generally believed to have preceded modern life forms based on DNA and proteins.

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Evolution, primate evolution, mouse lemurs, Strepsirrhini, Haplorhini, adapoids, omomyids, Fossil Bones

Twenty-Five Little Bones Tell a Puzzling Story About Early Primate Evolution

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A cache of exquisitely preserved bones, found in a coal mine in the state of Gujarat, India, appear to be the most primitive primate bones yet discovered, according to a new analysis.

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Debunking Chemtrails, New Earth Snake Species Discovered in Mexico, Cannibal Sharks of a Forgotten Age, and More in the Environment News Source

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Science

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Earth Science, Paleontology, Evolution

How Did Primate Brains Get So Big?

Virtual brains reconstructed from ancient, kiwi-sized primate skulls could help resolve one of the most intriguing evolutionary mysteries: how modern primates developed large brains.

Science

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archealogy, Ecology and Environment, Biology, Evolution, marine and freshwater biology, Paleontology

Unearthed: The Cannibal Sharks of a Forgotten Age

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Dublin, Ireland, Thursday 11th August, 2016 - Scientists have discovered macabre fossil evidence suggesting that 300 million-year-old sharks ate their own young, as fossil poop of adult Orthacanthus sharks contained the tiny teeth of juveniles. These fearsome marine predators used protected coastal lagoons to rear their babies, but it seems they also resorted to cannibalising them when other food sources became scarce.

Medicine

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Comparative neuroanatomy, Brain, Brain evolution, Neurons, Neuroscience, Primates

Total Number of Neurons — Not Enlarged Prefrontal Region — Hallmark of Human Brain

New study has determined that the total number of neurons, not an enlarged prefrontal region, differentiates the human brain from those of other primates.

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Biodiversity, Biology, Evolution, marine and freshwater biology, Zoology, veterinary science

Unraveling the Jaw-Dropping Goblin Shark

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A research team, led by Emeritus Professor Kazuhiro Nakaya of Japan's Hokkaido University, analyzed world-first footage captured by public broadcaster NHK in which two goblin sharks separately captured prey on a total of five occasions. The research has unraveled a century-old mystery surrounding how the deep-sea shark utilizes its protruding jaws, among other factors, to feed itself.

Medicine

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Agricultural Production/Economics, Disease In Developing Countries, Evolution, Genetics, Healthcare, Medicine & Health, Nutrition, Nutrient

Heredity Explains African-American Paradox, University of North Texas Researcher Says

Research from a University of North Texas historian supports the idea that the nation and region of origin of your ancestors contributes to your risk of developing, or not developing, a growing list of medical conditions.

Science

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Biology, Ecology and Environment, Evolution, plant life

Looking Different to Your Parents Can Be an Evolutionary Advantage

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Looking different to your parents can provide species with a way to escape evolutionary dead ends, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Biodiversity, Biology, development and reproductive biology, Evolution, Population Biology

Nature, Not Nurture, Defines Cricket Social Networks

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The social lives of crickets are similar generation to generation, even though the insects can't learn directly from their mum and dad.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Biology, Evolution

Smiling Baby Monkeys and the Roots of Laughter

When human and chimp infants are dozing, they sometimes show facial movements that resemble smiles. These facial expressions -- called spontaneous smiles -- are considered the evolutionary origin of real smiles and laughter.

Science

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Paleontology, Whales, Evolution, Echolocation, high-frequency hearing, ultrasonic hearing, Fossils, Cetaceans

"Echo Hunter": Researchers Name New Fossil Whale With High-Frequency Hearing

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A detailed study of a nearly-complete fossil skull reveals much about the evolution of high-frequency hearing, which plays a key role in echolocation. Researchers at NYIT conclude high-frequency hearing evolved about 27-million years ago, about the same time as echolocation, although some features evolved even earlier.

Science

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Evolution, Climate Change, Earth Science, Geology, Geography

Evolution Drives How Fast Plants Could Migrate with Climate Change

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New research from the University of British Columbia suggests evolution is a driving mechanism behind plant migration, and that scientists may be underestimating how quickly species can move.







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