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Evolution and Darwin

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Disgust, Emotion, genetically engineered food, Discrimination, Organ Donation, Prejudice, Evolution

Knee-Jerk Disgust Is Holding Humans Back

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Disgust is an emotion that's been co-opted to discriminate against people and things which pose no danger, holding humans back in social and evolutionary terms

Science

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Congo River Fish Evolution Shaped by Intense Rapids

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Genomic study in lower Congo reveals microscale diversification.

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India's Big Cats and Wild Dogs Get Along Really Well

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A new WCS study in India shows that three carnivores – tigers, leopards, and dholes (Asian wild dog) – seemingly in direct competition with one other, are living side by side with surprisingly little conflict.

Science

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Climate Change Impacting Wildlife, Feeding Wild Dolphins, Conserving Blakiston's Fish Owl, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Science

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Biophysics, Physiology, Aggression, stance, Posture, plantigrade, heel, Primate, Evolution

Flat-Footed Fighters

Walking on our heels, a feature that separates great apes, including humans, from other primates, confers advantages in fighting, according to a new University of Utah study published today in Biology Open. Although moving from the balls of the feet is important for quickness, standing with heels planted allows more swinging force, according to study lead author and biologist David Carrier, suggesting that aggression may have played a part in shaping our stance.

Science

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Evolution, Science, biological invasions , Invasive Species, Invasions, Climate Change, Global Warming, Environment, gypsy moths, Asian longhorned beetles , emerald ash borer, Trees, Biodiversity, Biology, Natural Resources, Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Jersey, NJ, Exotic Species, Predators, Pathogens, Ecology, Economy, protozoans, Ciliates, rotifers, European s

How Evolution Alters Biological Invasions

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Biological invasions pose major threats to biodiversity, but little is known about how evolution might alter their impacts over time. Now, Rutgers University scientists have performed the first study of how evolution unfolds after invasions change native systems. The experimental invasions – elaborate experiments designed by doctoral student Cara A. Faillace and her adviser, Professor Peter J. Morin – took place in glass jars suitable for savory jam or jelly, with thousands of microscopic organisms on each side.

Science

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Human Evolution, Anatomy, Medical School, Reseach, Primates, foot biomechanics, foot morphology, Paleoanthropology

Chimpanzee Feet Allow Scientists a New Grasp on Human Foot Evolution

An investigation into the evolution of human walking by looking at how chimpanzees walk on two legs is the subject of a new research paper published in Journal of Human Evolution.

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Making a Scavenger -- the Meat-Thieving Traits That Have Stood the Test of Time

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Nature requires the right mix of biological ingredients to make a good scavenger.

Science

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compulsory moral assessment, University of Vienna, optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation, Game Theory, Evolutionary, scientific reports, sanctioning wrongdoers, "good" and "bad", game-theoretical analysis, Artificial Intelligence

More Order with Less Judgement: An Optimal Theory of the Evolution of Cooperation

A research team led by Mathematician Tatsuya Sasaki from the University of Vienna presents a new optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation. This team proves that the practice of making moral assessments conditionally is very effective in establishing cooperation in terms of evolutionary game theory. "Our study also demonstrates the evolutionary disadvantage of seeking reputation by sanctioning wrongdoers," says Sasaki. The results of the study were published on the in Scientific Reports.

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Evolution, Genome, Genome size

Genomes in Flux: New Study Reveals Hidden Dynamics of Bird and Mammal DNA Evolution

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Evolution is often thought of as a gradual remodeling of the genome, the genetic blueprints for building an organism. But in some instance it might be more appropriate to call it an overhaul. Over the past 100 million years, the human lineage has lost one-fifth of its DNA, while an even greater amount was added, report scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Until now, the extent to which our genome has expanded and contracted had been underappreciated.

Science

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carnivorous plants, genome assemblies, Genome, pitcher plant, Biology (Genetics), Biology (Ecology/Environment)

Study Sheds Light on How Carnivorous Plants Acquired a Taste for Meat

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A new study probes the origins of carnivory in several distantly related plants — including the Australian, Asian and American pitcher plants, which appear strikingly similar to the human (or insect) eye.

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Animals Retain Long-Term Memory of the Biggest and Best Sources of Food

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New research shows that red-footed tortoises can remember the location of their favourite food sources and the biggest stashes for at least 18 months.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Men and Women Are Not That Different with Respect to Age Preferences of Sexual Partners

The difference between men and women with respect to their age preferences, when it comes to sexual partners, is smaller than earlier believed. A recent study shows that also men become interested in older and older women as they themselves age.

Medicine

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Social Environment, Health, mice

Social Environment Has a Sizable Impact on Health and Disease in Mice

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In humans, social factors may explain ‘missing heritability’ in complex diseases.

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A Quark Like No Other, Biophysics Plays Key Role in Immune System Signaling and Response, ALMA Reveals Sun in New Light, and MORE in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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One Night Stand Regrets

How we feel after 1-night stands has a lot to do with our gender -- and evolution.

Science

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Discovery Adds Rock Collecting to Neanderthal's Repertoire

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Interesting limestone rock found at Croatian Neanderthal site

Science

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Anthropology, acheology, Bering Strait, human settlements, Yukon, Radiocarbon, PLoS ONE, Montreal

The First Humans Arrived in North America a Lot Earlier Than Believed

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Anthropologists at Université de Montréal have dated the oldest human settlement in Canada back 10,000 years.

Science

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Biology, Genetics, Evolution, Fruit Flies

Scientists Engineer Animals with Ancient Genes to Test Causes of Evolution

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Scientists at the University of Chicago have created the first genetically modified animals containing reconstructed ancient genes, which they used to test the evolutionary effects of genetic changes that happened in the deep past on the animals’ biology and fitness.

Medicine

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Mapping Movements of Alien Bird Species

The global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers. It shows that human activities are the main determinants of how many alien bird species live in an area but that alien species are most successful in areas already rich with native bird species.







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