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UK Computer Science Professor Leading Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

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University of Kentucky Department of Computer Science's Brent Seales is on his way to making history, and uncovering it, with revolutionary software and 2,000-year old Herculaneum scrolls.

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Yabba Dabba D’OH! Stone Age Man Wasn’t Necessarily More Advanced Than the Neanderthals

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A multi-purpose bone tool dating from the Neanderthal era has been discovered by University of Montreal researchers, throwing into question our current understanding of the evolution of human behaviour. It was found at an archaeological site in France.

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Music Cuts Across Cultures

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Whether you are a Pygmy in the Congolese rainforest or a hipster in downtown Montreal, certain aspects of music will touch you in exactly the same ways. Researchers found that although the groups felt quite differently about whether specific pieces of music made them feel good or bad, their subjective and physiological responses to how exciting or calming they found the music to be appeared to be universal.

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Mexican Murals Reveal Art's Power

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New research by UChicago art historian Claudia Brittenham examines the mysterious and magnificent murals at the ancient site of Cacaxtla in present-day Mexico.

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How Can We Get "The Good Life?" Anthropology Can Help Guide Positive Change

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Using anthropology to look at similarities between different cultures can tell us a lot about what "the good life" means for everyone, says Vanderbilt anthropologist and World Health Organization wellbeing adviser Ted Fischer.

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Lightweight Skeletons Of Modern Humans Have Recent Origin

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New research shows that modern human skeletons evolved into their lightly built form only relatively recently — after the start of the Holocene about 12,000 years ago, and even more recently in some human populations. The work, based on high-resolution imaging of bone joints from modern humans and chimpanzees as well as from fossils of extinct human species, shows that for millions of years, extinct humans had high bone density until a dramatic decrease in recent modern humans.

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What Was The “Paleo Diet?” There Was Far More Than One, Study Suggests

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The Paleolithic diet, or caveman diet, a weight-loss craze in which people emulate the diet of plants and animals eaten by early humans during the Stone Age, gives modern calorie-counters great freedom because those ancestral diets likely differed substantially over time and space, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Kent State University.

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MSU Department Announces Major Archaeological Find

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Six official clay seals found by a Mississippi State University archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of biblical kings David and Solomon.

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The History of King David

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important information about the period of David’s reign, based on new archaeological and epigraphic data unearthed in northwestern Syria and southern Turkey

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Beer, Beef and Politics: Findings at Viking Archaeological Site Show Power Trumping Practicality

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Vikings are known for raiding and trading, but those who settled in Iceland centuries ago spent more time producing and feasting on booze and beef — in part to gain political clout in a place very different from their homeland, says a Baylor archaeologist.