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Science

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Biofuels Are Not Carbon Neutral, Predicting Jellyfish, Health Issues From Fracking, and More in the Environment News Source

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Science

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Anthropology, archealogy, Arts and Culture , History

One of the Most Significant Etruscan Discoveries in Decades Names Female Goddess Uni

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Archaeologists translating a very rare inscription on an ancient Etruscan temple stone have discovered the name Uni -- an important female goddess.

Science

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Funneling Fundamental Particles, Neutrino Experiments, Physicists Discover 'Apparent Departure From the Laws of Thermodynamics', and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Demography, Climate Change, History, Social And Behavioral Sciences, Urbanization

The demise of the Maya civilization: Water shortage can destroy cultures

Something really drastic must have happened to the Ancient Maya at the end of the Classic Period in the 9th century. Within a short period of time, this advanced civilisation in Central America went from flourishing to collapsing -- the population dwindling rapidly and monumental stone structures, like the ones built at Yucatán, were no longer being constructed. The reason for this demise remains the subject of debate even today. Model calculations by TU Wien may have found the explanation: the irrigation technology that served the Mayans well during periods of drought may have actually made their society more vulnerable to major catastrophes.

Science

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Language, Linguistic, Speech, perception and awareness, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Maternal Language Shapes Infants' Cry Melodies

Tonal languages sound rather strange to European ears: in contrast to German, French or English, their meaning is also determined by the pitch at which syllables or words are pronounced. A seemingly identical sound can mean completely different things - depending on whether it is pronounced with high pitch, low pitch or a specific pitch fluctuation.

Science

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Archeology, Kinesiology, Psychology, action and perception, Weaponry, movement science, Computer Modeling, throwing affordance, Early Humans

Tool or Weapon? IU Research Throws Light on Stone Artifacts' Use as Ancient Projectiles

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IU Bloomington professor Geoffrey Bingham and colleagues in the United Kingdom and United States contend that ancient stones discovered at an archeological site nearly 30 years ago served not as tools, as previously thought, but as weapons for defense and hunting. The research is reported in the journal Scientific Reports.

Science

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archealogy, Electromagnetic, History, New World

High-Tech Imaging Reveals Precolonial Mexican Manuscript Hidden From View for 500 Years

Researchers from the University of Oxford's Bodleian Libraries and from universities in the Netherlands have used high-tech imaging to uncover the details of a rare Mexican codex dating from before the colonization of the Americas. The newly revealed codex, or book, has been hidden from view for almost 500 years, concealed beneath a layer of plaster and chalk on the back of a later manuscript known as the Codex Selden, which is housed at the Bodleian Libraries. Scientists have used hyperspectral imaging to reveal pictographic scenes from this remarkable document and have published their findings in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports.

Science

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Anthropology research, Astrophyics, Dinosaur

Fossil Reveals Ostrich Relatives Once Lived in North America

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New research reveals that 50-million-year-old bird fossil specimens, some of which are on display in the Museum’s special exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us, are from a previously unknown relative of the modern-day ostrich.

Life

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Roman, Albania, Archaeology, Submerged, Harbour, Peter Campbell, Amphora, Tegulae

Expedition Finds Remains of Fortified Roman Port Are Much Larger Than Previously Thought

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An international team, co-directed by a University of Southampton archaeologist, has made a significant discovery at an underwater location in Albania – revealing that the submerged remains of a major ancient fortress and port are far larger than previously known.

Science

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Anthropology, archealogy, art and culture, Astronomy, History, Space And Planetary Science, New World

An Ancient Mayan Copernicus

For more than 120 years the Venus Table of the Dresden Codex -- an ancient Mayan book containing astronomical data -- has been of great interest to scholars around the world. The accuracy of its observations, especially the calculation of a kind of 'leap year' in the Mayan Calendar, was deemed an impressive curiosity used primarily for astrology.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavior, Computer Science, Multimedia/Networking/Interface Design, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Large Human Brain Evolved as a Result of 'Sizing Each Other Up'

Humans have evolved a disproportionately large brain as a result of sizing each other up in large cooperative social groups, researchers have proposed.

Science

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archealogy, Ecology and Environment, Biology, Evolution, marine and freshwater biology, Paleontology

Unearthed: The Cannibal Sharks of a Forgotten Age

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Dublin, Ireland, Thursday 11th August, 2016 - Scientists have discovered macabre fossil evidence suggesting that 300 million-year-old sharks ate their own young, as fossil poop of adult Orthacanthus sharks contained the tiny teeth of juveniles. These fearsome marine predators used protected coastal lagoons to rear their babies, but it seems they also resorted to cannibalising them when other food sources became scarce.

Science

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archealogy, History, old world

Britain's Last Hunter-Gatherers Discovered Using Breakthrough Analysis of Bone Fragments

Archaeologists from the Universities of York, Cambridge and UCL have identified rare human bones from the UK dating to the Late Mesolithic era (around 4000 BC, just prior to the arrival of farming in Britain) using an innovative new bone collagen analysis technique.

Medicine

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archealogy, old world

Sensational Grave Find in Cypriote Bronze Age City

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An archaeological expedition from the University of Gothenburg has discovered one of the richest graves from the Late Bronze Age ever found on the island of Cyprus. The grave and its offering pit, located adjacent the Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke, contained many fantastic gold objects such as a diadem, pearls, earrings and Egyptian scarabs, as well as more than 100 richly ornamented ceramic vessels. The objects, which originate from several adjacent cultures, confirm the central role of Cyprus in long-distance trade.

Science

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Stone Age, Neolithic, Tools, Anthropology

Research Reveals Effectiveness of Stones Thrown as Weapons by Stone Age Hunters

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Stone objects collected by prehistoric hunters were effective as throwing weapons to hunt animals, research at Leeds Beckett University reveals.

Science

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archealogy, old world, Paleontology

Tracking Down the First Chefs

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Archaeological sites speak about the everyday lives of people in other times. Yet knowing how to interpret this reality does not tend to be straightforward. We know that Palaeolithic societies lived on hunting and gathering, but the bones found in prehistoric settlements are not always the food leftovers of the societies that lived in them. Or they are not exclusively that. Peoples of this type were nomads and used to be constantly on the move across the territory, so other predators, such as hyenas or wolves, lurking around in search of food remains left by humans would be a common occurrence. Or even at a specific moment, carnivores could have sheltered in a cave abandoned by Prehistoric peoples and there raise their puppies and bring in the bones of the animals caught to feed them. These predators used to bite the bones leaving their teeth marks on them.

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UTSA Center for Archaeological Research Reimagines the Alamo

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Members of The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Center for Archaeological Research have teamed up with other archaeologists to study the Alamo and its grounds as part of the process to develop a master plan for the historic landmark.

Science

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthroplogy, Evolution, Language, Linguistics, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Voice Control in Orangutan Gives Clues to Early Human Speech

An adolescent orangutan called Rocky could provide the key to understanding how speech in humans evolved from the time of the ancestral great apes, according to new research.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Archaeology, 16th century, Spanish Colonial, Spanish America, Remote Sensing, Anthropology, South Carolina, Santa Elena, San Marcos

Archaeologists Find Elusive 16th-Century Spanish Fort on Parris Island

The lost Spanish fort San Marcos, founded in 1577 at the town of Santa Elena by Pedro Menedez Marquez, has been found on present-day Parris Island in South Carolina by a pair of archaeologists.

Science

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Study With Aye-Ayes and Slow Loris Finds That Prosimians Prefer Alcohol

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Study Sheds New Light on the Origins of Human Alcohol Consumption







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