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Migration Back to Africa Took Place During the Paleolithic

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A piece of international research led by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has retrieved the mitogenome of a fossil belonging to the first Homo sapiens population in Europe.

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Downed World War II Aircraft Missing for 72 Years Located in Pacific Islands by Project RECOVER

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An American aircraft missing since July 1944 was recently located off Palau by effort to combine advanced oceanographic technology with archival research to locate MIAs and military aircraft.

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Burial Sites Show How Nubians, Egyptians Integrated Communities Thousands of Years Ago

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New bioarchaeological evidence shows that Nubians and Egyptians integrated into a community, and even married, in ancient Sudan, according to new research from a Purdue University anthropologist.

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Nature vs. Nurture? Both Are Important, Anthropologist Argues

Some anthropologists try to understand how societies and histories construct our identities, and others ask about how genes and the environment do the same thing. Which is the better approach? Both are needed, argues Agustin Fuentes, University of Notre Dame biological anthropologist.

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Top Stories 5-17-2016

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Top Stories 5-16-2016

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New Evidence That Humans Settled in Southeastern US Far Earlier Than Previously Believed

The discovery of stone tools found in a Florida river show that humans settled the southeastern United States far earlier than previously believed—perhaps by as much as 1,500 years, according to a team of scientists that includes a University of Michigan paleontologist.

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Florida Archaeological Site Yields Clues to Early Civilization in Southeast U.S.

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The discovery of stone tools alongside mastodon bones in a Florida river shows that humans settled the southeastern United States as much as 1,500 years earlier than scientists previously believed, according to a research team led by a Florida State University professor. This site on the Aucilla River — about 45 minutes from Tallahassee — is now the oldest known site of human life in the southeastern United States. It dates back 14,550 years.

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Top Stories 5-13-2016

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World's Oldest Axe Fragment Found in Australia

Australian archaeologists have discovered a piece of the world's oldest axe in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia.

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New Research Suggests Climate Change May Have Contributed to Extinction of Neanderthals

A researcher at the University of Colorado Denver has found that Neanderthals in Europe showed signs of nutritional stress during periods of extreme cold, suggesting climate change may have contributed to their demise around 40,000 years ago.

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Archaeologists Uncover 13,000-Year-Old Bones of Ancient, Extinct Species of Bison at Old Vero Man Site

In what is considered one of the oldest and most important archaeological digs in North America, scientists have uncovered what they believe are the bones of a 13,000- to 14,000-year-old ancient, extinct species of bison at the Old Vero Man Site in Vero Beach, Fla.

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Top Stories 5-11-2016

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Top Stories 5-10-2016

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Humans Have Faster Metabolism than Closely Related Primates, Enabling Larger Brains, Study Finds

Loyola University Chicago researchers are among the co-authors of a groundbreaking study that found humans have a higher metabolism rate than closely related primates, which enabled humans to evolve larger brains. The findings may point toward strategies for combating obesity.

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New Interpretation of the Rök Runestone Inscription Changes View of Viking Age

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The Rök Runestone, erected in the late 800s in the Swedish province of Östergötland, is the world's most well-known runestone. Its long inscription has seemed impossible to understand, despite the fact that it is relatively easy to read. A new interpretation of the inscription has now been presented - an interpretation that breaks completely with a century-old interpretative tradition. What has previously been understood as references to heroic feats, kings and wars in fact seems to refer to the monument itself.

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New Data Improve Techniques for Determining Whether a Jaw Bone Comes From a Man or Woman

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The scientific breakthrough, carried out by researchers at UGR and the Spanish National Research Council, is of great significance to the field of biological anthropology. It also has further implications for paleoanthropology, paleodemographics, forensic science and orthodontics, among other disciplines.

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Underwater Archaeology Looks at Atomic Relic of the Cold War

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Recently declassified documents on the USS Independence freely available online in the Journal of Maritime Archaeology.

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Water Storage Made Prehistoric Settlement Expansion Possible in Amazonia

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he pre-Columbian settlements in Amazonia were not limited to the vicinities of rivers and lakes. One example of this can be found in the Santarém region in Brazilian Amazonia, where most archaeological sites are situated in an upland area and are the result of an expansion of settlements in the last few centuries before the arrival of Europeans. This is concluded by a research team consisting of archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg and Brazilian colleagues.

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The Female Pelvis Adjusts for Childbearing Years

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According to new studies, wide hips do not reduce locomotor efficiency.