Curated News:

Featured: DailyWire

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Northwestern University, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Brain

Rhythm of Breathing Affects Memory and Fear

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered for the first time that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall. These effects on behavior depend critically on whether you inhale or exhale and whether you breathe through the nose or mouth.

Science

Channels:

Atmospheric Science, Weather, Thunderstorms, Climate Modeling, Great Plains, Midwest, Rain, Precipitation

Where the Rains Come From

southerngreatplainsrain.jpg

Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.

Science

Channels:

Black Death ‘Plague Pit’ Discovered at 14th-Century Monastery Hospital

48 skeletons discovered in ‘Plague Pit’ – 27 of them children; Extremely rare discovery suggests community was overwhelmed by the Black Death

Science

Channels:

Zahavi’s handicap principle, Natural Selection, Sexual Selection, Evolution, Biology, ornamentation

Study Explains Evolution Phenomenon That Puzzled Darwin

Abrams-Taurusscarabbeetles.jpeg

Why do some animals have extravagant, showy ornaments -- think deer antlers, peacock feathers and horns on beetles -- that can be a liability to survival? Northwestern University researchers have a possible explanation for this puzzling phenomenon of evolution.

Science

Channels:

NASA, UAH, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Johnson space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, National Space Science Technology Center, Neutron detector, International Space Station (ISS), Fast Neutron Spectrometer, Radiation, Manned Space Missions, Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR)

New Design Neutron Spectrometer Being Tested for Manned Spaceflight

454A6369.JPG

The Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FNS) is now aboard the International Space Station. Neutrons contribute to crew radiation exposure and must be measured to assess exposure levels. The FNS uses a new instrument design that can significantly improve reliability.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Neuroscience, Religion, Mormons, Nucleus Accumbens, reward circuit, fMRI

This Is Your Brain on God: Spiritual Experiences Activate Brain Reward Circuits

Religious and spiritual experiences activate the brain reward circuits in much the same way as love, sex, gambling, drugs and music, report researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine. The findings will be published Nov. 29 in the journal Social Neuroscience.

Science

Channels:

Researchers Develop Soft, Microfluidic 'Lab on the Skin' for Sweat Analysis

Rogersdeviceonarm.JPG

A Northwestern University research team has developed a first-of-its-kind soft, flexible microfluidic device that easily adheres to the skin and measures the wearer’s sweat to show how his or her body is responding to exercise. A little larger than a quarter and about the same thickness, the simple, low-cost device analyzes key biomarkers to help a person decide quickly if any adjustments, such as drinking more water or replenishing electrolytes, need to be made or if something is medically awry.

Science

Channels:

Turkeys, Anthropology, Native Americans

FSU Researchers Talk Turkey: Native Americans Raised Classic Holiday Bird Long Before First Thanksgiving

Wild_turkey_eastern_us.jpg

Florida State University Associate Professor of Anthropology Tanya Peres and graduate student Kelly Ledford write in a paper published today that Native Americans were raising and managing turkeys far before the first Thanksgiving.

Science

Channels:

Chicxulub, Chicxulub crater, Asteroids, Rocks, Gulf Of Mexico, Dinosaurs, Craters, peak ring, Drilling, Science, Magnetism, Magnetic, Rutgers, Rutgers University, RU, New Jersey, NJ, Habitat, Biosphere, Organisms, Earth, Environment, Crust, Planets, Solar System, MARS, Martian, Hydrothermal, Imperial College London, LIFE, core, granite, porosity, Water, Fossils, European Co

Asteroid Impacts Could Create Habitats for Life

Sonia1eleber40ECORD_IODP_split_cores_DSC06107300.jpg

An international team of 38 scientists, including Rutgers’ Sonia Tikoo, has shown how large asteroid impacts deform rocks and possibly create habitats for early life on Earth and elsewhere.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Brain, Neuroscience, Cognition, Facial Recognition, Gender Differences

Finally, a Type of Face That Men Recognize Better Than Women

A study using Barbies and Transformers finds that men are better at recognizing Transformer faces while women are better at recognizing Barbie faces, supporting the theory that experience plays an important role in facial recognition.

Science

Channels:

Snakes, illegal trade, invasive animals, Biodiversity, Reptiles, Introduced Species

Snake Black Market Poses Risk to Humans and Wildlife

Puffadder.JPG

The illegal reptile trade, including venomous snakes, could put wildlife, the environment and human lives at risk, a new study has found.

Science

Channels:

Climate Change May Prevent Volcanoes From Cooling the Planet

volcano770.jpg

New UBC research shows that climate change may impede the cooling effect of volcanic eruptions.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Biochemistry, Ecology and Environment, Molecular Biology, Toxicology, Diagnostics, Behavior, Law Enforcement, Crime Scene Investigation, Mass Spectrometry

What Molecules You Leave on Your Phone Reveal About Your Lifestyle

dorrestein_phone_swab.jpg

By sampling the molecules on cell phones, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences were able to construct lifestyle sketches for each phone’s owner, including diet, preferred hygiene products, health status and locations visited. This proof-of-concept study could have a number of applications, including criminal profiling, airport screening, medication adherence monitoring, clinical trial participant stratification and environmental exposure studies.

Medicine

Channels:

interleukin 33, IL-33, Itch Gene, Antibodies, Poison Ivy Rash, Poison Ivy Treatment, Atopic Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Dermatologic Conditions, Duke Health, PNAS

Mouse Study Shows Antibody Can Soothe Raging, Nerve-Driven Poison Ivy Itch

duke-itch-neuron-poison-ivy-interleukin.jpg

Scientists at Duke Health and Zhejiang Chinese Medical University have developed a strategy to stop the uncontrollable itch caused by urushiol, the oily sap common to poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak and even mango trees. The team found that by blocking an immune system protein in the skin with an antibody, they could halt the processes that tell the brain the skin is itchy.

Science

Channels:

galaxies formation, ALMA telescope

Tsunami of Stars and Gas Produces Dazzling Eye-Shaped Feature in Galaxy

zoom.jpg

Astronomers using ALMA have discovered a tsunami of stars and gas that is crashing midway through the disk of a spiral galaxy known as IC 2163. This colossal wave of material – which was triggered when IC 2163 recently sideswiped another spiral galaxy dubbed NGC 2207 – produced dazzling arcs of intense star formation that resemble a pair of eyelids.

Science

Channels:

Climate, Hurricane, Robert Korty, Pliocene Epoch, Texas A&M University

Hurricanes From 3 Million Years Ago Give Us Clues About Present Storms

HurricaneEye_1.jpg

Studying hurricane and tropical storm development from three million years ago might give today’s forecasters a good blueprint for 21st century storms, says a team of international researchers that includes a Texas A&M University atmospheric sciences professor.

Science

Channels:

Chinese Alligators, Endangered, Recovery

World’s Most Endangered Alligator Making a Comeback – in Shanghai

WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) reports that eggs of critically endangered Chinese alligators discovered recently in a nest in a Shanghai wetland park have hatched and that baby alligators have been photographed and identified swimming in the area. The announcement signals a huge success for the species and for ongoing reintroduction efforts initiated by East China Normal University, Chongming Dongtan Wetland Park, and WCS with the help of U.S. zoos including WCS’s Bronx Zoo, and the Saint Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park.

Science

Channels:

West Antarctic Ice Sheet, Glaciers

UCI and NASA Document Accelerated Glacier Melting in West Antarctica

WestAntarcticaMap.png

Two new studies by researchers at the University of California, Irvine and NASA have found the fastest ongoing rates of glacier retreat ever observed in West Antarctica and offer an unprecedented look at ice melting on the floating undersides of glaciers. The results highlight how the interaction between ocean conditions and the bedrock beneath a glacier can influence the frozen mass, helping scientists better predict future Antarctica ice loss and global sea level rise.

Medicine

Channels:

Musculature, Orthopedic Medicine, Exercise, Spaceflight, Astronaut, International Space Station, Spine, Back Pain

For Space Station Astronauts, Spinal Muscles Shrink After Months in Space

chang_ISS_logo_2.jpg

While astronauts on long space missions do not experience a change in spinal disc height, the muscles supporting the spine weaken, find researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine. The study provides new insights into the elevated rates of back pain and disc disease associated with prolonged spaceflight.

Science

Channels:

Microbes, fracking, Frackibacter, Microbial Communities

Deep Down Fracking Wells, Microbial Communities Thrive

frackingmicrobesprint.jpg

Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells. New finding help scientists understand what is happening inside fracking wells and could offer insight into processes such as corrosion and methane production.







Chat now!