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Caught in the Act: UW Astronomers Find a Rare Supernova ‘Impostor’ in a Nearby Galaxy

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UW astronomers Breanna Binder and Ben Williams have identified a rare type of 'supernova impostor' in a nearby galaxy, with implications for how scientists look at the short, complex lives of massive stars.

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New Study Confirms Giant Flightless Bird Wandered the Arctic 50 Million Years Ago

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A single toe bone found on Ellesmere Island in the 1970s is described for the first time.

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Rare Beluga Data Show Whales Dive to Maximize Meals

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As the Arctic continues to change due to rising temperatures, melting sea ice and human interest in developing oil and shipping routes, it’s important to understand belugas’ baseline behavior, argue the authors of a new paper.

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Queen’s Scientists on the Hunt for Source of Gravitational Waves

Yesterday saw the announcement of the discovery of gravitational waves by LIGO, in what is being described as the most important breakthrough in physics for decades. Now scientists from Queen’s University Belfast are leading the hunt for the source of these ripples in space.

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Clues About Human Migration to Imperial Rome Uncovered in 2,000-Year-Old Cemetery

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Ancient immigrants to Rome included young children, men.

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A Surprise Role for Dopamine in Social Interplay

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Scientists have shown that the chemical signal dopamine plays an unexpected role in social interactions. In mice, nerve cells in the brain that release dopamine became particularly active in animals kept on their own for a short time.

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Origins Of "Rage" Identified in Brain in Male Animal Model

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Violent, unprovoked outbursts in male mice have been linked to changes in a brain structure tied to the control of anxiety and fear, according to a report by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center to be published in the journal Current Biology online Feb. 11.

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Gravitational Waves Detected 100 Years After Einstein’s Prediction

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For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the Earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. A UAH researcher was at the center of action.

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Yale Researchers Discover Underlying Cause of Myeloma

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Yale Cancer Center researchers have identified what causes a third of all myelomas, a type of cancer affecting plasma cells. The findings, published in the Feb. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, could fundamentally change the way this cancer and others are treated.

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Couch Potatoes May Have Smaller Brains Later in Life

Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, according to a study published in the February 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Plankton Communities Key to Carbon Reaching Safe Resting Spot, Ocean Study Reveals

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The ocean’s power to rein in carbon and protect the environment is vast but not well-understood. But now, an international team of scientists has begun to illuminate how the ocean plucks carbon from the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming, and shuttles it to the bottom of the sea.

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Whooping Cranes' Predatory Behavior Key for Adaptation, Survival

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The whooping crane, with its snowy white plumage and trumpeting call, is one of the most beloved American birds, and one of the most endangered. As captive-raised cranes are re-introduced in Louisiana, they are gaining a new descriptor: natural killer. A new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, suggests Louisiana cranes are faring well thanks in part to their penchant for hunting reptiles and amphibians.

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Genetics Help Fish Thrive in Toxic Environments, Collaborative Study Finds

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A 10-year collaborative project led by biologists from Kansas State University and Washington State University has discovered how the Atlantic molly is able to live in toxic hydrogen sulfide water.

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Paper: Homeownership a 'Dream Deferred' for Millennial Generation

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For previous generations of Americans, homeownership was seen as one of the final rites of passage into adulthood and financial independence.

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Americans Recognize 'Past Presidents' Who Never Were, Study Finds

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Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, Hubert Humphrey and some guy named "Thomas Moore" are among the names that many Americans mistakenly identify as belonging to a past president of the United States, finds a news study by memory researchers at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Social Hormone Promotes Cooperation in Risky Situations

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A hormone implicated in monogamy and aggression in animals also promotes trust and cooperation in humans in risky situations, Caltech researchers say.

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‘A Word's Worth More Than a Thousand Pictures’ According to New FAU Study on Young Children

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Children play an important role in ensuring that they are cared for by adults by using physical and cognitive cues. But what’s more important in how they influence adults and elicit their nurturing spirit? Is it their physical features or what they say?

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Physics: It's What's Happening Inside Your Body Right Now

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Using a model blood vessel system built on a polymer microchip, researchers have shown that the relative softness of white blood cells determines whether they remain in a dormant state along vessel walls or enter blood circulation to fight infection.

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Fossil Discovery: Extraordinary ‘Big-Mouthed’ Fish From Cretaceous Period

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An international team of scientists have discovered two new plankton-eating fossil fish species of the genus called Rhinconichthys from the oceans of the Cretaceous Period, about 92 million years ago, when dinosaurs roamed the planet.

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Early Human Ancestor Didn’t Have the Jaws of a Nutcracker, Study Finds

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Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that a possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products. But new research by an international team of researchers now shows that Australopithecus sediba didn’t have the jaw and tooth structure necessary to exist on a steady diet of hard foods.