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An Ounce of Prevention: Research Advances on ‘Scourge’ of Transplant Wards

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The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year. It’s difficult to treat because fungi are genetically quite similar to humans, so compounds that affect fungi tend to have toxic side effects for patients. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified 18 proteins that play a role in spore formation and germination. The findings raises the possibility of preventing the disease by blocking the spores’ germination.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 31-Aug-2015 3:00 PM EDT

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Parkinson’s Disease Brain Cells at Risk of Burnout, Like an Overheating Motor

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The death of brain cells in Parkinson’s disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported today.

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Are You a Nomophobe?

Iowa State University researchers have developed a questionnaire to help you determine if you suffer from nomophobia or a fear of being without your mobile phone.

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Survivors of Childhood Cancer Have High-Risk of Recurrent Stroke

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A new study from the UC San Francisco Pediatric Brain Center shows that childhood cancer survivors suffering one stroke have double the risk of suffering a second stroke, when compared with non-cancer stroke survivors.

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Antimatter Catches a Wave at SLAC

A study led by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of California, Los Angeles has demonstrated a new, efficient way to accelerate positrons, the antimatter opposites of electrons. The method may help boost the energy and shrink the size of future linear particle colliders – powerful accelerators that could be used to unravel the properties of nature’s fundamental building blocks.

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Hypoallergenic Parks: Coming Soon?

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Grenada, Spain's climate and layout is like that of many cities in the Mediterranean area, which has the highest occurrence of pollen allergies in the world. The researchers hope their efforts will lead to fantastic urban green spaces that don’t cause allergic reactions for 30% of the city’s population.

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Fertilization Discovery: Do Sperm Wield Tiny Harpoons?

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Could the sperm harpoon the egg to facilitate fertilization? That’s the intriguing possibility raised by the University of Virginia School of Medicine’s discovery that a protein within the head of the sperm forms spiky filaments, suggesting that these tiny filaments may lash together the sperm and its target.

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Quitting Smoking After Heart Attack Gives Quick Boost to Mental Health, Quality of Life

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A new study shows that quitting smoking after a heart attack has immediate benefits, including less chest pain, better quality of daily life and improved mental health. Many of these improvements became apparent as little as one month after quitting and are more pronounced after one year, according to the research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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The Greater a Country’s Gender Equality in Employment, the Higher Its Homicide Rate

The greater a country’s gender equality when it comes to employment, the higher the overall homicide rate, according to a Baylor study of 146 countries. What is uncertain is the "why" of that, hip, although prior research suggests it may be due to threatening male status, the researcher says.