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Cervical Cancer, botswana-upenn partnership, Botswana, HIV, AIDS

New Approach to Cervical Cancer Care in Botswana Cuts Lag Time Between Treatment and Diagnosis in Half

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Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for women low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, where 75 percent of cervical cancer patients suffer from advanced forms of the disease. These patients can face wait times as long as five months after diagnosis before receiving lifesaving treatment. A new, multidisciplinary model of cervical cancer care developed by a University of Pennsylvania team based in Botswana cut the delay between diagnosis and treatment by more than 50 percent, according to research published this month in the Journal of Global Oncology.

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T Cell, Vaccination

Penn Team Tracks Rare T Cells in Blood to Better Understand Annual Flu Vaccine

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A team has found a way to identify the small population of circulating helper T cells present in the blood after an annual flu vaccine to monitor their contribution to antibody strength. A technique that identifies these helper immune cells could inform future vaccine design, especially for vulnerable populations.

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Micro-RNA May Amplify Effectiveness of Sorafenib in Difficult Liver Cancer Cases

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Only 25% of patients respond to sorafenib treatment, so researchers have endeavored to understand its mechanism of action and discover a way to boost its effectiveness.

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Health, Medicine, Grant Funding

Philly’s Opportunity to Address Health Disparities Through Research Funding

R01, K, R03, T32 – navigating the world of NIH grants, especially in uncertain financial funding times, can be confusing. Last month, Gary H. Gibbons, MD, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health, delivered a keynote address to explain existing opportunities, and outlined the institute’s vision for future funding of research.

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Stem Cells Collected From Fat May Have Use in Anti-Aging Treatments

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Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat are more stable than other cells – such as fibroblasts from the skin – and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. They made the discovery after developing a new model to study chronological aging of these cells.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

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Patient Safety, Living Will, Physicians Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment, Do Not Resuscitate, Patient Video Message, Triad, Journal of Patient Safety

Video Messages Clarify Patients' Wishes for Critical Versus End-of-Life Care

Adding a patient-created video testimonial to a living will or "POLST" form can help to prevent errors of interpretation regarding the choice between life-sustaining treatment or allowing natural death in critically ill patients, according to a study in the March Journal of Patient Safety. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Heart Disease, Global Health

Tackling Heart Disease on a Global Scale

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More than 17.5 million people die from cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year – making it the number one cause of death worldwide and rates of CVD in low- and middle-income countries have been climbing at an alarming rate.

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Quality of Life (QOL), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Short Form-6D (SF-6D), Total Hip Arthroplasty, Total Hip Replacement, value-based care, patient-reported outcomes, Michael A Mont, MD

After Joint Replacement Surgery, Smokers at Increased Risk of Reoperation for Infection

For patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement, smoking is associated with an increased risk of infectious (septic) complications requiring repeat surgery, reports a study in the February 15 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Heart Failure, Heart Transplant, total artificial heart, LVAD, Left Ventricular Assist Device, Heart Failure Devices

The Medical Minute: Treatment Options for Heart Failure

Ask any doctor what can be done to maintain a healthy heart and the answer will most likely be eat healthy and exercise regularly. But what happens when someone's heart is not healthy and does not pump blood properly?

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International Team Establishes First Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Multicentric Castleman Disease

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More than six decades after Castleman disease (CD) was first described, a group of experts from Penn Medicine and other institutions around the world has established the first set of diagnostic criteria for a life-threatening subtype of the condition, idiopathic multicentric CD (iMCD), which is often misdiagnosed as other illnesses.

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Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder, MRI, Brain Imaging, Center for Autism Research, Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia, autism risk

Measurements in Baby's First Year May Point to Autism Risk

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For the first time, researchers have identified before age one which high-risk infants are likely to develop autism. The multicenter study focused on infants who have older siblings with autism spectrum disorder. If replicated, the findings, based on brain MRIs, could set the stage for earlier treatments and better long-term outcomes for these children.

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NCCN, National Comprehensive Cancer Network, nccn guidelines, Payers, Insurance, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, multigene test, Genomics, Fox Chase Cancer Center

Payers Weigh the Implications of Multigene Testing Coverage in New UCSF Study

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A recent study from the UCSF Center for Translational and Policy Research on Personalized Medicine and the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center identified opportunities to address the barriers to coverage of hereditary cancer panels, as published in JNCCN.

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TMAU, rare disease, exome sequencing, fish odor, Sensory Evaluation, FMO3, Body Odor

Potential New Causes for the Odor-Producing Disorder TMAU

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A study from the Monell Center and collaborators provides new insight into the causes of trimethylaminura (TMAU), a genetically-transmitted metabolic disorder that leads to accumulation of a chemical that smells like rotting fish. Previously attributed solely to mutations in the FMO3 gene, the study identifies additional genes that may contribute to TMAU. The findings indicate that genetic testing to identify FMO3 mutations may not be sufficient to identify all underlying causes of TMAU.

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American Journal Of Nursing, Moral Distress, Health Care, Nursing, Moral Resilence

Moral Distress in Health Care—Special Report Outlines Strategies to Increase Moral Resilience

Nurses in all roles and specialties face complex ethical situations that challenge their values, giving rise to moral distress. New approaches to overcoming the challenges of moral distress by increasing moral resilience are presented in a supplement to the February issue of the American Journal of Nursing. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Penn Orphan Disease Center Partners with Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics on Gene Therapy Research

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Penn Medicine’s Orphan Disease Center (ODC) announces a new partnership with FAST (Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics) to study gene therapy approaches to treat Angelman syndrome (AS). FAST will provide funding to establish a gene therapy research program led by ODC.

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Pediatrics, pediatric cardiology, Congenital Heart Disease, HLHS, Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia, Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Announce Collaboration on Rare Congenital Heart Defect

Mayo Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are collaborating to delay and prevent heart failure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of a child's heart is severely underdeveloped.

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Healthcare Acquiried Conditions, Preventable Mortality, HAC, Incident Reports, National Transportation Safety Board, Patient Safety, Culture of Safety, Importance of Nursing

Preventing Hospital-Related Deaths Due to Medical Errors – 'We Can and Must Do Better'

How many patients die in the hospital as a result of preventable medical errors? While debate continues over estimates based on flawed data, the US healthcare system can and must implement effective strategies to reduce adverse events and deaths, according to a special perspective article in the March Journal of Patient Safety. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Is Running Really Good for the Heart?

From the Broad Street Run here in Philadelphia to the Cherry Blossom 10-mile run in Washington, DC, and others across the country and overseas, running season is just around the corner! And for many people, from avid runners to weekend warriors, that means it’s almost time to lace up your shoes and dust off those training plans. But, recent news stories about runners suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and other heart-related complications mid-race might leave some wondering if there may actually be a risk to running.

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Journal Of Occupational And Environmental Medicine

Supportive Leadership Linked to Lower Absenteeism/Presenteeism

More supportive leadership behaviors (SLB) in the workplace are associated with lower productivity losses due to absenteeism and presenteeism, reports a study in the February Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).







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