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University of Vienna, quantum race, Winner, loser, macroscopic world, Order, Physics, quantum operations, Superposition, Austrian Academy of Sciences, experimental quantification, Science Advances

In a Quantum Race Everyone Is Both a Winner and a Loser

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Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. However, in the quantum world orders can be ‘scrambled’. It is possible for different orders of quantum operations to coexist in a superposition. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in an upcoming issue of "Science Advances".

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Converting CO2 to Methanol, Cryo-Electron Microscopy, Space Dust in 3-D, and More in the DOE Science News Source

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Roger Penrose, Quantum Mechanics, Artificial Intelligence, consciousness; neuroscience; neural correlates; AI; evolution of life; , Schrodinger Cat Paradox, mental and cognitive disorders, quantum effects , brain functions, Oxford University

Roger Penrose Institute to Form in San Diego

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A unique institute is being formed to develop and investigate the forward-thinking ideas of eminent British physicist Sir Roger Penrose. To be based in San Diego, California, with collaborations in London and Oxford in the UK, and Tucson, Arizona, the Institute will examine the interplay between quantum mechanics and general relativity and the possible implications on our understanding of consciousness.

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Obituary, Physics, Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Nobel Prize, Particles, Ion Trap

Hans Dehmelt — Nobel Laureate and University of Washington Professor Emeritus — Has Died at Age 94

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Hans Georg Dehmelt, Nobel physics laureate and professor emeritus at the University of Washington, died in Seattle on March 7, 2017 at age 94. Dehmelt was a celebrated scientist who developed methods to isolate atoms and subatomic particles and measure their fundamental properties with high accuracy.

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Laser, Quantum Dot, Nanoscience, Nanotechnology

‘Flying Saucer’ Quantum Dots Hold Secret to Better, Brighter Lasers

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Vanderbilt University chemists collaborated in research that ‘squashes’ the shape of nanoparticles to create inexpensive lasers that continuously emit light in a customizable rainbow of colors.

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A New World for Wireless Communication, Parachute Design, Flipping Magnetic Memory Cells, and More in the Engineering News Source

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University of Vienna, Caslav Brukner, Faculty of Physics, Blurred Times, Quantum World, measuring time, modern physics, space and time, Quantum Mechanics, Einstein, general relativity, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Clocks, PNAS

"Blurred Times" in a Quantum World

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When measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. However, combining quantum mechanics and Einstein’s theory of general relativity theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measure time. The more precise a given clock is, the more it "blurs" the flow of time measured by neighbouring clocks. As a consequence, the time shown by the clocks is no longer well defined. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

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quantum critical point, quantum criticality, quantum behavior, Absolute Zero, ultrathin systems, ultralow temperatures, measuring specific heat, thermal phase transition, quantum phase transition

Scientists Create a Nano-Trampoline to Probe Quantum Behavior

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For the first time, scientists have measured quantum criticality by developing a thin membrane suspended in air by very narrow bridges, thereby forming a "nano-trampoline". This enabled specific heat measurements of thin films through a quantum phase transition from a superconducting state to an electrically insulating state close to absolute zero temperatures.

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Bose-Einstein Condensate, entangled, quantum phase transition

Looking for Entangled Atoms in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

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Using a Bose-Einstein condensate composed of millions of sodium atoms, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have observed a sharp magnetically-induced quantum phase transition where they expect to find entangled atomic pairs. The work moves scientists closer to an elusive entangled state that would have potential sensing and computing applications beyond its basic science interests.

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data, Data tansfer, Superdense coding, Quantum, Quantum Computing, Fiber Optic, Optical Fiber, Quantum communicaiton, Computing, Qubit, Quantum bit

ORNL Researchers Break Data Transfer Efficiency Record

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Researchers have set a new record in the transfer of information via superdense coding, a process by which the properties of particles like photons, protons and electrons are used to store as much information as possible.







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