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Husbandry of Chickens Works in Tandem with Science, Says Virginia Tech Poultry Expert

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Wind-Blown Antarctic Sea Ice Helps Drive Ocean Circulation

Antarctic sea ice is constantly on the move as powerful winds blow it away from the coast and out toward the open ocean. A new study shows how that ice migration may be more important for the global ocean circulation than anyone realized.

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Breathing New Life Into Public Schoolyards Benefits Entire Communities

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An Iowa State University landscape architecture studio is part of a collaboration that's breathing new life into more than 300 neglected schoolyards in Philadelphia. They represent a burgeoning national movement to green schoolyards.

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Jun-2016 2:00 PM EDT

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From Fire Break to Fire Hazard

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The peat bogs of the world, once waterlogged repositories of dead moss, are being converted into fuel-packed fire hazards that can burn for months and generate deadly smoke, warns a McMaster researcher who documents the threat – and a possible solution ¬– in a paper published today in the journal Nature Scientific reports.

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Modeling of the Universe with Einstein; Learning About the Future From the Distant Past; Particle Zoo in a Quantum Computer and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

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@UUtah Geographer Available to Comment on Wildfire Evacuation "Trigger Points" and a Way to Let Homeowners Check on Their Property

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Hairs, Feathers and Scales Have a Lot in Common!

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The potential evolutionary link between hairs in mammals, feathers in birds and scales in reptiles has been debated for decades. Today, researchers of the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Switzerland, demonstrate that all these skin appendages are homologous: they share a common ancestry. On the basis of new analyses of embryonic development, the Swiss biologists evidenced molecular and micro-anatomical signatures that are identical between hairs, feathers and scales at their early developmental stages. These new observations, published today in Science Advances, indicate that the three structures evolved from their common reptilian ancestor.

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Beach Replenishment Helps Protect Against Storm Erosion During El Niño

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A comparison of recent and previous nourishments of San Diego beaches suggests that a larger sand grain size improved nourishment performance

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Researchers Offer New Theory About How Climate Affects Violence

Researchers have long struggled to explain why some violent crime rates are higher near the equator than other parts of the world. Now, a team of researchers have developed a model that could help explain why.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Jun-2016 12:00 AM EDT

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$10.2 Billion Environmental Fine Clears Cloud Hanging Over Volkswagen

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A New Bio-Ink for 3-D Printing with Stem Cells

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The new stem cell-containing bio ink allows 3D printing of living tissue, known as bio-printing.

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One of Africa's Most Biodiverse Regions Protected

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The Itombwe Reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), one of Africa’s most biodiverse sites, had its boundaries formally approved today by the Provincial Governor – a critical step in establishing and ensuring the effective protection of this important site.

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Do Sharks Survive After the Hook?

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Fitbit-like sensors are the best tools for monitoring whether sharks survive catch-and-release fishing — essential data for fisheries management — according to a peer-reviewed study published June 23 by scientists from Mote Marine Laboratory.

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Migratory Bears Down in the Dumps

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University of Utah biologists working in Turkey discovered two surprising facts about a group of 16 brown bears: First, six of the bears seasonally migrated between feeding and breeding sites, the first known brown bears to do so. Second, and more sobering, the other 10 bears stayed in one spot all year long: the city dump.

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Columbia Engineers Develop New, Low-Cost Way to Capture Carbon

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Xi Chen, associate professor of earth + environmental engineering at Columbia Engineering, and Klaus Lackner at Arizona State University, reports an unconventional reversible chemical reaction in a confined nanoenvironment. The discovery, a milestone in clarifying the scientific underpinnings of moisture-swing chemical reaction, is critical to understanding how to scrub CO2 from the Earth's atmosphere; the researchers have already used it to capture CO2 more efficiently and at a much lower cost than other methods.

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94 Million-Year-Old Climate Change Event Holds Clues for Future

A major climate event millions of years ago that caused substantial change to the ocean’s ecological systems may hold clues as to how the Earth will respond to future climate change, a Florida State University researcher said.

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A “Fitbit” for Plants?

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Knowing what physical traits a plant has is called phenotyping. Because it is such a labor intensive process, scientists are working to develop technology that makes phenotyping much easier. The tool is called the Phenocart, and it captures essential plant health data. The Phenocart measures plant vital signs like growth rate and color, the same way a Fitbit monitors human health signals like blood pressure and physical activity.

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Contagious Cancers Are Spreading Among Several Species of Shellfish, Study Finds

New research suggests that direct transmission of cancer among marine animals may be much more common than once thought.