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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Diabetes, Heart Disease, Atheroclerosis

Researchers Implicate Suspect in Heart Disease Linked to Diabetes

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Scientists have struggled to trace the specific biology behind diabetes-associated heart disease risk or find ways to intervene. Now, UNC researchers have hunted down a possible culprit – a protein called IRS-1, which is crucial for the smooth muscle cells that make up veins and arteries.

Medicine

Science

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Parents Grade Themselves, Signals from Fat, Getting Teens to Exercise, and More in the Obesity News Source

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

Medicine

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familial hypercholesterolemia, LDL, Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Heart Disease

UAB Developing New Peptide to Combat a Disorder That Causes Heart Attacks at Early Age

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Some people inherit a condition that elevates their cholesterol to an excessive degree, and no amount of diet or exercise can bring the numbers down. UAB researchers are developing and testing a new peptide that may lead to better treatment options.

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“Designer Cardiovascular Therapies:” New Ways on the Horizon to Fix a Broken Heart

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Unlike the self-repair abilities of our skin, bone and other tissues, which can readily heal and rebuild themselves after injury, evolution has left the mammalian heart with relatively little regenerative capacity. Finding new ways to repair and protect a broken heart is the core of labs like those of physician-scientists Jon Epstein, MD, executive vice dean and chief science officer at Penn Medicine, and Rajan Jain, MD an assistant professor of Cardiovascular Medicine.

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Testosterone Treatment Improves Bone Density and Anemia, May Lead to Cardiac Risk

It is commonly known that testosterone levels decrease as men age, but until last year, little was known about the effects of testosterone treatment in older men with low testosterone. Today, in a group of papers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers found that testosterone treatment improved bone density and anemia for men over 65 with unequivocally low testosterone. However, testosterone treatment did not improve cognitive function, and it increased the amount of plaque buildup in participants’ coronary arteries.

Medicine

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Physiology, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Cardiovascular Disease, Heart Disease, Kidney Disease, Potassium in Diet, Sodium

Raising Dietary Potassium to Sodium Ratio Helps Reduce Heart, Kidney Disease

Reducing sodium (salt) in the diet has been recommended to lower blood pressure and the risk of heart disease. However, in a new review article, University of Southern California researchers found that increasing dietary potassium is as important to improving the risk factors for cardiovascular and kidney disease as limiting dietary sodium.

Medicine

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Marban, Biological Pacemaker, Eugenio Cingolani, sinoatrial node (SAN), Pacemaker Cells, SAN cells, iSAN cells , Joshua Goldhaber, Tbx18

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute Awarded $3 Million to Develop Biological Pacemakers as Alternatives to Electronic Devices

With a new $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute investigators are moving closer to their goal of developing a biological pacemaker that can treat patients afflicted with slow heartbeats. The novel, minimally-invasive gene therapy turns patients’ normal heart cells into pacemaker cells that regulate heart function – potentially replacing electronic pacemakers one day.

Medicine

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Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular, Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Cholesterol, Exercise, Family History, Heart Attack, Heart Health, Heart Health Month, Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, Prevention, Stress, Weight Management

Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup Shows African-Americans Significantly More Concerned About Heart Health

A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent).

Medicine

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Medication Adherence, medication research, Medication, Congestive Heart Failure, cardiovascuar disease

Interventions Improve Medication Adherence, Decrease Risk of Hospitalizations

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Poor adherence to medication regimens is a common problem among patients with cardiovascular diseases like high blood pressure, heart disease, and heart failure. Poor adherence is one reason mortality rates among those patients remain high. Todd Ruppar, associate professor in the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri, has found that a variety of interventions aimed at increasing medication adherence can help people with cardiovascular disease avoid the hospital. Ruppar will address the barriers to medication adherence during the Public Health Grand Rounds offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Tuesday, Feb. 21 in Atlanta.

Medicine

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Health, Medicine, Grant Funding

Philly’s Opportunity to Address Health Disparities Through Research Funding

R01, K, R03, T32 – navigating the world of NIH grants, especially in uncertain financial funding times, can be confusing. Last month, Gary H. Gibbons, MD, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health, delivered a keynote address to explain existing opportunities, and outlined the institute’s vision for future funding of research.

Medicine

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ICU mortality, COPD exacerbations, COPD, Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Pneumonia, Health Care Costs

ICU Care for COPD, Heart Failure and Heart Attack May Not Be Better

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Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit? Unless a patient is clearly critically ill, the answer may be no, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed more than 1.5 million Medicare records. Their study, “ICU Admission and Survival among Older Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Heart Failure, or Myocardial Infarction,” is published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Healthy Hearts, Florida State University, FSU, Penny Ralston, Churches, African-Americans, Cardiovascular And Respiratory Disease, Heart Disease, Heart Disease and African Americans

Healing Generations: FSU Center Tackles Heart Health in African-American Churches

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As the nation recognizes American Heart Month this February, Florida State University’s Center on Better Health and Life for Underserved Populations has successfully helped 36 black churches in Leon and Gadsden counties set a foundation for healthier living.

Medicine

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Woman's Health, Heart Disease, UAB Hospital, Women's Heart Disease, Women's Heart Health, Cardiovascular disease (CVD), Menopause And Heart Disease

New Women’s Heart Health Clinic Provides Specialized Care

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According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, 23 percent of women will die within one year after having a heart attack, and nearly 46 percent of women become disabled with heart failure.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, Global Health

Tackling Heart Disease on a Global Scale

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More than 17.5 million people die from cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year – making it the number one cause of death worldwide and rates of CVD in low- and middle-income countries have been climbing at an alarming rate.

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UF/IFAS Helps ‘Keep the (Blood) Pressure Down’

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New UF/IFAS Extension program aims to help people around Florida maintain healthy blood pressure.

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Fragile X Syndrome, Steven Tyler's Janie's Fund Wins Big, Untreated Water Making Our Kids Sick, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Spinal Cord Injuries

Spinal Cord Injury Patients Face Many Serious Health Problems Besides Paralysis

Spinal cord injury patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; pneumonia; life-threatening blood clots; bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; constipation and other gastrointestinal problems; pressure ulcers; and chronic pain.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Heart Attack, Cardiovascular, STEMI, Clogged Arteries, heart blockage, Myocardial, defibrilator, Pacemaker, Anesthesia

Preparation, Attention to Detail Translates to Excellence in Cardiac Care

Jaromir Bobek of Harris Health System's Ben Taub Hospital prides himself on his cardiology team's preparation and attention to detail. The service line routinely receives national recognition for its expertise and quick treatment of some of the most severe heart attack cases.

Medicine

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Heart Failure, Heart Transplant, total artificial heart, LVAD, Left Ventricular Assist Device, Heart Failure Devices

The Medical Minute: Treatment Options for Heart Failure

Ask any doctor what can be done to maintain a healthy heart and the answer will most likely be eat healthy and exercise regularly. But what happens when someone's heart is not healthy and does not pump blood properly?

Medicine

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Congestive Heart Failure, Health Technology, Heart Failure, Heart Monitors, Heart Month, Nursing Home Care

Technology Helps Older Adults Living with Congestive Heart Failure

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Congestive heart failure is one of the most common reasons for hospital admissions among those 65 years old and older, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To help reduce these admissions and the strain they put on the healthcare system, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed bed sensors than can warn older adults of impending heart problems. Marjorie Skubic, a professor of electrical and computer engineering in the College of Engineering, and Marilyn Rantz, Curators’ Professor Emerita in the Sinclair School of Nursing, believe this technology can help older adults living with congestive heart failure and reduce hospitalizations.







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